World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

High Bridge, New Jersey

High Bridge, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of High Bridge
High Bridge Reformed Church
High Bridge Reformed Church
Map of High Bridge in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of High Bridge in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of High Bridge, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of High Bridge, New Jersey
Coordinates: [1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated March 29, 1871 (as township)
Reincorporated February 19, 1898 (as borough)
Government[3][4]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor Mark Desire (R, term ends December 31, 2018)[5]
 • Administrator Doug Walker[4]
 • Clerk Diane Seals[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 2.431 sq mi (6.297 km2)
 • Land 2.389 sq mi (6.188 km2)
 • Water 0.042 sq mi (0.109 km2)  1.74%
Area rank 377th of 566 in state
15th of 26 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 295 ft (90 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 3,648
 • Estimate (2014)[10] 3,588
 • Rank 426th of 566 in state
16th of 26 in county[11]
 • Density 1,526.9/sq mi (589.5/km2)
 • Density rank 334th of 566 in state
5th of 26 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08829[12][13]
Area code(s) 908 Exchanges: 617, 638[14]
FIPS code 3401931320[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885251[1][17]
Website .org.highbridgewww

High Bridge is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,648,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 128 (-3.4%) from the 3,776 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 110 (-2.8%) from the 3,886 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • Census 2010 3.1
    • Census 2000 3.2
  • Economy 4
  • Parks and recreation 5
  • Government 6
    • Local government 6.1
    • Federal, state and county representation 6.2
    • Politics 6.3
  • Education 7
  • Transportation 8
    • Roads and highways 8.1
    • Public transportation 8.2
  • Points of interest 9
  • Notable people 10
  • References 11
  • External links 12

History

Main Street, 2012

High Bridge was originally incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 29, 1871, from portions of Clinton Township and Lebanon Township. On February 19, 1898, the borough of High Bridge was incorporated from portions of the township, with the remainder returned to Clinton and Lebanon Townships five days later.[19]

The borough is located on the South Branch of the Raritan River in the north central part of Hunterdon County. Water from the South Branch was a valuable power source for one of the first ironworks in the United States, established in the 1740s by William Allen and Joseph Turner of Philadelphia.[20] Allen was the mayor of Philadelphia, a Chief Justice of Pennsylvania, and a prominent landowner in New Jersey. In 1859, the Central Railroad of New Jersey began a five-year construction project of a 112-foot (34 m) high, 1,300-foot (400 m) long bridge across the river from which structure the locality ultimately took its name.[21][22][23]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.431 square miles (6.297 km2), including 2.389 square miles (6.188 km2) of land and 0.042 square miles (0.109 km2) of water (1.74%).[1][2] It is drained by the South Branch of the Raritan River.

High Bridge borders the Hunterdon County municipalities of Clinton Township and Lebanon Township.[24]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Jericho Hill, Pierce Heights and Silverthorn.[25]

Demographics

Census 2010

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,648 people, 1,418 households, and 1,004 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,526.9 per square mile (589.5/km2). There were 1,481 housing units at an average density of 619.9 per square mile (239.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.17% (3,399) White, 1.32% (48) Black or African American, 0.22% (8) Native American, 3.18% (116) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.74% (27) from other races, and 1.37% (50) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.00% (219) of the population.[7]

There were 1,418 households, of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.3% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.2% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.06.[7]

In the borough, 24.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 32.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.9 years. For every 100 females there were 101.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $90,037 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,054) and the median family income was $108,148 (+/- $6,913). Males had a median income of $77,500 (+/- $10,021) versus $47,936 (+/- $5,291) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,866 (+/- $4,587). About 0.0% of families and 0.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 3,776 people, 1,428 households, and 1,051 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,566.0 people per square mile (604.9/km2). There were 1,478 housing units at an average density of 613.0 per square mile (236.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.24% White, 0.79% African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.43% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.45% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.12% of the population.[32][33]

There were 1,428 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.4% were non-families. 20.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.10.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 36.4% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.7 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $68,719, and the median income for a family was $75,357. Males had a median income of $56,607 versus $35,450 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,276. About 1.9% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Economy

High Bridge has a downtown (Main Street) that is home to eateries, services and professionals. Circa Restaurant, at the center of Main Street, has received acclaim from a variety of sources including a food editor from The New York Times who proclaimed, "Circa is the kind of place I wish were in my town."[35]

The businesses are collectively marketed by the High Bridge Business Association, which assists its member businesses through co-operative advertising, press releases, goodwill and other benefits.[36]

Parks and recreation

Union Forge building
Solitude House

High Bridge serves as the southern terminus of a rail trail that was created out of the former

External links

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  4. ^ a b c d Council, High Bridge Borough. Accessed January 5, 2015.
  5. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed April 20, 2015. As of date accessed, Desire was listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of High Bridge, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for High Bridge borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d ?? Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. ???. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for High Bridge borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for High Bridge, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for High Bridge, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 155. Accessed February 14, 2013.
  20. ^ Lawlor, Julia. "If You're Thinking of Living In/High Bridge, N.J.; Steel Town Reborn as Family Community",
  21. ^ Hunterdon County webpage for High Bridge Borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed March 20, 2007.
  22. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 156. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed April 21, 2015. "Highbridge; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for its remarkable railroad bridge."
  23. ^ History of High Bridge, High Bridge Borough. Accessed September 1, 2015. "High Bridge was named for a 1,300 foot-long, 112 foot-high bridge built by the Central Railroad Company across the South Branch of the Raritan River. It was too costly to maintain and was subsequently filled in with an earthen embankment, leaving a double-arch culvert through which the River and Arch Street pass through. Construction of the embankment began in 1859 and took five years to complete."
  24. ^ Areas touching High Bridge, MapIt. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  25. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed April 20, 2015.
  26. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  28. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  31. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for High Bridge borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for High Bridge borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for High Bridge borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  35. ^ Cook, Karla. "DINING/HIGH BRIDGE; Having Fun, With Mussels and More", The New York Times, October 15, 2006. Accessed September 28, 2008. "Yet Circa is the kind of place I wish were in my town. The space is magical; only the steak breaks the $30 mark in the dinner category; and Mr. Coury, who graduated from the French Culinary Institute and worked at the Ryland Inn in Whitehouse, the Frenchtown Inn and Nodo in Princeton, is having fun."
  36. ^ Our Mission, High Bridge Business Association. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  37. ^ Columbia Trail, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Division of Parks and Recreation. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  38. ^ Brickman, Rachael S. "New trail will trace High Bridge's history", and ending as Amesbury Furnace circa 1753 in Clinton Township
  39. ^ Home page, High Bridge Hills Golf Club. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  40. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  41. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  42. ^ High Bridge Borough Government: Overview, Borough of High Bridge. Accessed March 12, 2007.
  43. ^ Staff. "Hunterdon County election results 2014", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 4, 2014. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  44. ^ Wright, Terry. "High Bridge appoints Tewksbury teacher to Council vacancy", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 26, 2014. Accessed April 21, 2015. "Stephen Strange, a third-grade teacher in Tewksbury Township Elementary School, is the newest member of Borough Council. The Council appointed him to fill the seat of Victoria Miller, who resigned effective Oct. 31. Voters will elect somebody to the post in the November 2015 election."
  45. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ 2015 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  47. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  51. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  52. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  53. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  54. ^ District 18 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  55. ^ "About the Governor". State of  
  56. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of  
  57. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  58. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  59. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  60. ^ J. Matthew Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  61. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  62. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  63. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  64. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  65. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  66. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  67. ^ 2014 Elected Officials, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  68. ^ 2014 County and Municipal Guide ... Hunterdon County Now, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  69. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  70. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  71. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  72. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  73. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  74. ^ "Governor - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  75. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  76. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  77. ^ District information for High Bridge School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  78. ^ School Data for the High Bridge School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  79. ^ High Bridge Elementary School, High Bridge School District. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  80. ^ High Bridge Middle School, High Bridge School District. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  81. ^ Schools, High Bridge School District. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  82. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the High Bridge School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  83. ^ Voorhees High School 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed April 21, 2015. "Voorhees High School has consistently ranked among the top high schools in New Jersey. With an enrollment of 1,097 students in grades 9-12, the school serves the communities of Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, and Tewksbury Township."
  84. ^ About the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed January 4, 2015. "North Hunterdon High School educates students from: Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough, Union Township; Voorhees High School educates students from: Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, Tewksbury Township"
  85. ^ Information Regarding Choice of District School, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed January 4, 2015. "In the past, parents and students of the North Hunterdon High School sending districts were able to select either North Hunterdon High School or Voorhees High School as their school of choice.... As our student population continued to grow and our two high schools reached, and exceeded, 90% capacity, the option of choosing Voorhees was eliminated in the 2005-2006 school year for the North Hunterdon sending districts (Bethlehem Township, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township – Clinton Town students still have choice as they are classmates at Clinton Public School with Glen Gardner students, who attend Voorhees)."
  86. ^ About the District North Hunterdoon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed January 4, 2015. "North Hunterdon High School educates students from: Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough, Union Township; Voorhees High School educates students from: Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, Tewksbury Township"
  87. ^ Hunterdon County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  88. ^ High Bridge station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  89. ^ Raritan Valley Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  90. ^ Hunterdon County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  91. ^ Tyrrell, Joe. "The Battle for Solitude House", NJSpotlight, July 30, 2012. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  92. ^ Taylor Steel Workers Historical Greenway, Union Forge Heritage Association Solitude House Museum. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  93. ^ TISCO Building, New Jersey Historic Trust. Accessed February 20, 2011.
  94. ^ O'Brien, Walter. "Historic Solitude House shares birthday party with nation", Home News Tribune, July 1, 2008. Accessed February 20, 2011. "Tour Lake Solitude Dam recently named to Preservation New Jersey's 2008 10 Most Endangered List and the last remaining buttress dam in the state."
  95. ^ About Us, New Jersey Astronomical Association. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  96. ^ Frank Baldwin, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  97. ^ Dey, Jim. "Naomi Jakobsson", The News-Gazette, May 11, 2014. Accessed January 4, 2015. "The Jakobssons met in the early 1960s in High Bridge, N.J., a city were Naomi grew up and where Eric was working at a cryogenics laboratory."
  98. ^ Bolton, Whitney. "New York Day by Day", Reading Eagle, May 17, 1957. Accessed February 20, 2011.
  99. ^ Dan Smith player profile, The Baseball Cube. Accessed July 29, 2007.
  100. ^ Historic Clinton,

References

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with High Bridge include:

Notable people

The Paul Robinson Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned and operated by Edwin E. Aldrin Astronomical Center.[95]

Springside Farm, was established in 1803, by Archibald S. Taylor, as the agricultural farm of the Taylor Iron and Steel Company.

Lake Solitude dam, replacing the crib dam of 1858, replaced in 1909, is the last remaining example of a buttress dam in New Jersey, built by master engineer Frank S. Tainter.[94]

The TISCO Headquarters, constructed in 1742 for the Union Iron Works, is the oldest office building in New Jersey.[93]

The Taylor Steel Workers Historical Greenway, created by the Union Forge Heritage Association, connects to the Columbia Trail.[92]

[91] Solitude House, built circa 1710-1725, became the centerpiece of the iron plantation that became Union Forge Ironworks. Later called Taylor Iron and Steel Company, it eventually became known as Taylor-Wharton.

Points of interest

Originally a vital junction for the Central Railroad of New Jersey in hauling iron ore from northern New Jersey via its High Bridge Branch which headed north toward Wharton, High Bridge[88] now serves as the westernmost station on New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line.[89][90] It is located at the southern end of the station. The parking lot for the station is located one block to the west. The station only uses the southern track for inbound and outbound trains. There is a station building that is no longer used and there are two small shelters. This station has limited weekday service and no weekend service. The station has been the western terminus of the line since 1983, the year NJT commenced operations. Between 1983 and 1989, NJT reached Phillipsburg, New Jersey on the former Central Railroad of New Jersey mainline. Since that time, the route between High Bridge and Phillipsburg has been inactive. NJT considers making plans for bringing service back to Phillipsburg again in the future.

Public transportation

Interstate 78 is accessible via Routes 513 and 31 in neighboring Clinton Township.

CR 513 is the main road that passes through and connects to Route 31 to the west.

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 21.00 miles (33.80 km) of roadways, of which 18.99 miles (30.56 km) were maintained by the municipality and 2.01 miles (3.23 km) by Hunterdon County.[87]

Roads and highways

Transportation

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Voorhees High School, which also serves students from Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, Lebanon Township and Tewksbury Township, who attend Voorhees High School in Lebanon Township.[83] The school is part of the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District, which also includes students from Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township who attend North Hunterdon High School in Annandale.[84][85][86]

The High Bridge School District serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 395 students and 42.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.29:1.[77] Schools in the districts (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[78]) are High Bridge Elementary School[79] for grades Pre-K - 5 (258 students) and High Bridge Middle School[80] for grades 6 - 8 (137 students).[81][82]

Education

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.3% of the vote (778 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 28.5% (320 votes), and other candidates with 2.1% (24 votes), among the 1,136 ballots cast by the borough's 2,469 registered voters (14 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 46.0%.[74][75] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 60.6% of the vote (819 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.1% (367 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.3% (139 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (15 votes), among the 1,352 ballots cast by the borough's 2,433 registered voters, yielding a 55.6% turnout.[76]

In the John Kerry with 43.0% (778 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (25 votes), among the 1,811 ballots cast by the borough's 2,315 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.2.[73]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,414 registered voters in High Bridge, of which 502 (20.8%) were registered as Democrats, 971 (40.2%) were registered as Republicans and 934 (38.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[69]

Politics

[68][67][66], 2018).Kingwood Township and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; [65], 2016)Alexandria Township Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; [64] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[63][62], 2017).Hampton and Robert G. Walton (R; [61], 2016)Flemington John E. Lanza (R; [60], 2015),Clinton Town; R J. Matthew Holt ([59], 2016),Holland Township Freeholder Deputy Director Suzanne Lagay (R; [58], 2015),Raritan Township As of 2015, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director John King (R; [57]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 18th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Peter J. Barnes III (D, Edison) and in the General Assembly by Patrick J. Diegnan (D, South Plainfield) and Nancy Pinkin (D, East Brunswick).[53][54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[50] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[51][52]

High Bridge is located in the 7th Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 18th state legislative district.[8][46][47] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, High Bridge had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[48]

Federal, state and county representation

In November 2014, the Borough council selected Stephen Strange to fill the vacant seat expiring in 2016 of Victoria Miller, who had resigned from office in the previous month.[44]

As of 2015, the Mayor of High Bridge Borough is Republican Mark Desire, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Members of the Borough Council are Lynn Hughes (2016), Karen Scarcia (2015), Adrienne Shipps (R, 2017), Stephen Strange (appointed on an interim basis to serve an unexpired term ending in 2016), Mike Stemple (2015) and Chris Zappa (R, 2017).[4][43]

High Bridge is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[3] The Borough form of government used by High Bridge, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[40][41][42]

Local government

Government

The High Bridge Hills golf course, located near Route 31, provides another means of recreation in the small town.[39]

[38] miles (8.4 km) around the borough, starting at Columbia Trail and connecting the borough's parks and other historic sites.41 5 Union Forge Park is High Bridge's main public park, located across the

[37]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.