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Hypotrichosis

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Hypotrichosis

Hypotrichosis
Classification and external resources
ICD-9-CM 704.09
DiseasesDB 14765
MeSH D007039

Hypotrichosis (hypo- + tricho- + -osis) is a condition of abnormal hair patterns - predominantly loss or reduction. It occurs, most frequently, by the growth of vellus hair in areas of the body that normally produce terminal hair. Typically, the individual's hair growth is normal after birth, but shortly thereafter the hair is shed and replaced with sparse, abnormal hair growth. The new hair is typically fine, short and brittle, and may lack pigmentation. Baldness may be present by the time the subject is 25 years old.[1]

Hypotrichosis is a common feature of Hallermann–Streiff syndrome as well as others. It can also be used to describe the lack of hair growth due to chemotherapy.

The opposite of hypotrichosis is hypertrichosis, where terminal hair (thick) grows in areas that would otherwise normally have vellus hair (thin), for example abnormally thick facial hair growth in women.

Genetic forms of localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis include:

Type OMIM Gene Locus
LAH1 607903 DSG4 18q12
LAH2 604379 LIPH 3q27
LAH3 611452 P2RY5 13q14.12-q14.2

See also

References

  1. ^ Dawber, Rodney P. R.; Van Neste, Dominique (2004). Hair and scalp disorders: common presenting signs, differential diagnosis and treatment (2nd ed.). Informa Health Care. pp. 53–54.  


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