World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

IBM Research

IBM Research headquarters, the Eero Saarinen-designed Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York.

IBM Research is

  • IBM Research Official Website
  • Projects
  • Research History Highlights (Top Innovations)
  • Research history by year
  • Oral history interview with Martin Schwarzschild head of Watson Scientific Computation Laboratory at Columbia University, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota
  • IBM Research's technical journals

External links

Further reading

  1. ^ http://www.research.ibm.com/labs/
  2. ^
  3. ^ a b Beatty, Jack, (editor) Colussus: how the corporation changed America, New York : Random House, 2001. ISBN 978-0-7679-0352-3. Cf. chapter "Making the 'R' Yield 'D': The IBM Labs" by Robert Buderi.
  4. ^ a b IBM, "Watson Research Center: Watson Facility History"
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^ http://www.research.ibm.com/featured/history/
  8. ^

References

  • IBM Journal of Research and Development

Publications

Historic research centers

Research

Laboratories

Other notable developments

IBM Research is home to 5 Nobel Laureates, 9 US National Medals of Technology, 5 US National Medals of Science, 6 Turing Awards, and 13 Inductees in the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

IBM Research's numerous contributions to physical and computer sciences include the Scanning Tunneling Microscope and high temperature superconductivity, both of which were awarded the Nobel Prize. IBM Research was behind the inventions of the SABRE travel reservation system, the technology of laser eye surgery, magnetic storage, the relational database, UPC barcodes and Watson, the question-answering computing system that won a match against human champions on the Jeopardy! television quiz show. The Watson technology is now being commercialized as part of a project with healthcare company WellPoint.

Major undertakings at IBM Research have included the invention of innovative materials and structures, high-performance microprocessors and computers, analytical methods and tools, algorithms, software architectures, methods for managing, searching and deriving meaning from data and in turning IBM's advanced services methodologies into reusable assets.

Applications

Advances in nanotechnology include IBM in atoms, where a scanning tunneling microscope was used to arrange 35 individual xenon atoms on a substrate of chilled crystal of nickel to spell out the three letter company acronym. It was the first time atoms had been precisely positioned on a flat surface.[8]

Notable company inventions include the automated teller machine (ATM), the floppy disk, the hard disk drive, the magnetic stripe card, the relational database, the Universal Product Code (UPC), the financial swap, the Fortran programming language, SABRE airline reservation system, DRAM, copper wiring in semiconductors, the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) semiconductor manufacturing process, Watson artificial intelligence.[7]

Advances

Contents

  • Advances 1
  • Applications 2
    • Other notable developments 2.1
  • Laboratories 3
    • Research 3.1
    • Historic research centers 3.2
  • Publications 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6
  • External links 7

As of 2013 the company held the record for most patents generated by a business for 22 consecutive years.[6]

IBM employees have garnered five Nobel Prizes, six Turing Awards, ten National Medals of Technology, and five National Medals of Science.[5]

The roots of today's IBM Research began with the 1945 opening of the Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory at Columbia University.[2] This was the first IBM laboratory devoted to pure science and later expanded into additional IBM Research locations in Westchester County, New York starting in the 1950s,[3][4] including the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 1961.[3][4]

[1]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.