World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

IBM zEnterprise System

Article Id: WHEBN0028120172
Reproduction Date:

Title: IBM zEnterprise System  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: IBM z196, IBM zEC12 (microprocessor), IBM System z10, IBM System/360, IBM OMEGAMON
Collection: Ibm System/360 Mainframe Line
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

IBM zEnterprise System

A trio of IBM zEnterprise mainframe computers. From left to right: EC12, BC12, Bladecenter Extension.
An IBM zEnterprise EC12 with the cover removed. The interior is lit to better see the various internal parts.

IBM zEnterprise System is the latest line of IBM mainframes designed to offer both mainframe and distributed server technologies in an integrated system. The zEnterprise System consists of three components.[1] First is a System z server - a choice of the newest enterprise class server, the IBM zEnterprise EC12 that was announced August 28, 2012,[2] the smaller business class server the IBM zEnterprise 114 (z114) announced July 2011,[3] or the older enterprise-class server the IBM zEnterprise 196 (z196) that was introduced July 2010. Second is the IBM zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension (zBX), the infrastructure designed to provide logical integration and host IBM WebSphere DataPower Integrated Appliance XI50 for zEnterprise (DataPower XI50z) or general purpose x86 or Power blades. Last is the management layer, IBM zEnterprise Unified Resource Manager (zManager), which provides a single management view of zEnterprise resources.

In July 2013, IBM introduced an updated version of the z114 called the zBC12 and a special version of it designed to be a Linux virtualization server, the zBC12 Enterprise Linux Server[4] running only Linux hosts on the underlying z/VM hypervisor.

Contents

  • Features 1
    • Processors and memory 1.1
      • zEnterprise EC12 1.1.1
      • zEnterprise BC12 1.1.2
      • zEnterprise 114 1.1.3
      • zEnterprise 196 1.1.4
    • Operating systems 1.2
    • BladeCenter Extension (zBX) 1.3
    • Unified Resource Manager 1.4
    • Liquid cooling 1.5
    • PU characterization 1.6
  • Models 2
    • Enterprise Class 2.1
    • Business Class 2.2
  • See also 3
  • External links 4
  • References 5

Features

Processors and memory

zEnterprise EC12

The zEnterprise EC12 (zEC12) is based on the zEC12 chip, a 5.5 GHz hexa-core out-of-order CISC-based zArchitecture processor. The zEC12 can have a maximum of 120 cores, 101 of which are customer configurable to run operating systems and applications.[5] The maximum number of cores available in a particular model of the zEC12 is denoted by the model name. For example, the H20 has up to 20 cores orderable for direct customer use, plus spare and a special I/O processor core type, the System Assist Processor. Each core can be characterized as a Central Processor (CP), Integrated Facility for Linux (IFL) processor, z Application Assist Processor (zAAP), z10 Integrated Information Processor (zIIP), Internal Coupling Facility (ICF) processor, or additional System Assist Processor (SAP). The zEnterprise EC12 allows up to 3 TB (usable) of redundant array of independent memory (RAIM).

zEnterprise BC12

The zEnterprise BC12 (zBC12) is based on an upscaled z114, running 18 zEC12 processors at 4.2 GHz and up to 489 GB RAM. It's available in two models, the H06 and the H13 with one and two processing drawers respectively. The zBC12 can connect to the zBX expansion system. IBM is offering a special version of the zBC12 called the Enterprise Linux Server running only Linux hosts on top of its z/VM hypervisor targeting large migrations from x86 based Linux installations.

zEnterprise 114

The zEnterprise 114 (z114) is powered by up to 14 microprocessors running at 3.8 GHz out-of-order CISC-based zArchitecture processor. The z114 offers 130 capacity settings across two models and is designed for to offer the hybrid capabilities of the zEnterprise System with a lower capacity, an lower energy usage, and lower price.[6] Each core can be characterized as a Central Processor (CP), Integrated Facility for Linux (IFL) processor, z Application Assist Processor (zAAP), z10 Integrated Information Processor (zIIP), Internal Coupling Facility (ICF) processor, or additional System Assist Processor (SAP). The z114 supports up to 248 GB (usable) of redundant array of independent memory (RAIM).

zEnterprise 196

The zEnterprise 196's microprocessor is the z196 chip, a 5.2 GHz quad-core out-of-order CISC-based z/Architecture processor. The z196 can have a maximum of 24 processors giving a total of 96 cores, 80 of which are directly available to run operating systems and applications.[7] The number of cores available in a particular model of the z196 is denoted by the model name. For example, the M15 has 15 cores available for direct customer use, plus spare and service processor cores. Each core can be characterized as a Central Processor (CP), Integrated Facility for Linux (IFL) processor, z Application Assist Processor (zAAP), z10 Integrated Information Processor (zIIP), Internal Coupling Facility (ICF) processor, or additional System Assist Processor (SAP). The zEnterprise also supports x86 or Power blades attached via the zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension (zBX). The zEnterprise 196 allows up to 3 TB (usable) of redundant array of independent memory (RAIM).

Operating systems

The zEC12, zBC12, z114 and z196 support the IBM operating systems: z/OS, z/VM, z/VSE, and z/TPF. Other operating systems available include Linux on System z, such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11.[8] In November, 2011, IBM introduced Microsoft Windows Server 2008 support via X86 processor-based blades that plug into IBM's zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension (zBX). The zBX also supports the IBM WebSphere DataPower Integrated Appliance XI50 for zEnterprise (DataPower XI50z).

The zBX supports up to 112 blade modules. There is a redundant, secure 10 Gigabit Ethernet connection between the zBX and the server providing a private data network. There is also a 1 Gigabit Ethernet connection for management.

BladeCenter Extension (zBX)

The zEnterprise System supports an optional zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension (zBX). This add-on infrastructure supports redundant top-of-Rack switches, redundant power supplies, extra blowers, and IBM BladeCenter chassis. This add-on chassis allows POWER7 and x86 blade servers to be integrated with and managed from the mainframe.[9] The Gameframe installation at Hoplon Infotainment is an example of a hybrid mainframe.

The zBX supports up to 112 blade modules.[10] The zBX and the System Z server are connected by a redundant, secure 10 Gigabit Ethernet connection, providing a private data network. There is also a 1 Gigabit Ethernet connection for management.

Unified Resource Manager

The zEnterprise Unified Resource Manager (zManager) allows the supported zBX platforms to be virtualized into a single system for management. It also allows for the prioritization of certain workloads in the system. The Resource Manager can monitor the various platforms for signs of bottlenecks or faults and modify the overall system to recover, maintaining a specified quality of service level.[11]

Liquid cooling

The zEC12 and z196 support external liquid cooling. Customers have the option of purchasing their mainframe with a water-cooled heat exchanger.[12]

PU characterization

Each purchased PU (processor unit) is characterized as one of a variety of types:

  • CP: Central processor; The standard processors. For use with any supported operating system and user applications.
  • IFL: Integrated Facility for Linux; Exploited by Linux and for z/VM processing in support of Linux. It is not possible to IPL operating systems other than z/VM or Linux on an IFL.
  • zAAP: Application Assist Processor; Exploited under z/OS for designated workloads, which include the IBM JVM and XML System Services functions.
  • zIIP: Integrated Information Processor; Exploited under z/OS for designated workloads, which include various XML System Services, IPSec offload, certain parts of IBM DB2 DRDA, star schema, IBM HiperSockets for large messages, and the IBM GBS Scalable Architecture for Financial Reporting.
  • ICF: Internal Coupling Facility; Used for z/OS clustering, running exclusively the Coupling Facility Control Code (CFCC).
  • SAP: System Assist Processor; Offloads and manages I/O operations.
  • IFP: Integrated Firmware Processor; reserved for managing new generation of PCIe adapters in zEC12 and zBC12.
  • Spares: exclusively reserved to provide failover in the extremely unlikely event of a processor (CP, IFL, zAAP, zIIP, ICF, SAP or IFP) failure.

Also it's possible to run a zAAP-eligible workload on zIIPs if no zAAPs are enabled. IBM does not impose any software charges on work that is dispatched on zAAP and zIIP processors.

The addition of IFLs, zAAPs, zIIPs, ICFs, SAPs or IFPs does not change the system capacity setting or its MSU rating, only CPs do.

Models

Enterprise Class

The zEC12 is available in five hardware models: H20, H43, H66, H89 and HA1.[13] The model number is based on the number of cores available for customer workloads. Additional cores are reserved as spares, SAPs and IFPs.

Model CPs IFLs zAAPs / zIIPs ICFs SAPs IFPs Spares Memory (GB)
H20 1-20 0-20 0-10 / 0-10 0-20 4-8 1 2-20 32-704
H43 1-43 0-43 0-21 / 0-21 0-43 8-16 1 2-43 32-1392
H66 1-66 0-66 0-33 / 0-33 0-66 12-24 1 2-66 32-2272
H89 1-89 0-89 0-44 / 0-44 0-89 16-32 1 2-89 32-3040
HA1 1-101 0-101 0-50 / 0-50 0-101 16-32 1 2-101 32-3040

The z196 is available in five hardware models: M15, M32, M49, M66 and M80. The model number is based on the number of cores available for customer workloads.[8] Additional cores are reserved as spares and as SAPs.

Model CPs IFLs zAAPs / zIIPs ICFs SAPs Spares zBX Memory (GB)
M15 0-15 0-15 0-7 / 0-7 0-15 3 2-15 0-1 32-752
M32 0-32 0-32 0-16 / 0-16 0-16 6 2-32 0-1 32-1520
M49 0-49 0-49 0-24 / 0-24 0-16 9 2-49 0-1 32-2288
M66 0-66 0-66 0-33 / 0-33 0-16 12 2-66 0-1 32-3056
M80 0-80 0-80 0-40 / 0-40 0-16 14 2-80 0-1 32-3056

Business Class

The zBC12 was introduced in July 2013 and is available in two hardware models, the Mo6 and the M13. It's designed to serve the mid-range business segment and can be configured to be a Linux virtualization server, in a version called the Enterprise Linux Server. It has 18 processor cores, with up to 13 configurable.

Model CPs IFLs zAAPs / zIIPs ICFs zBX Memory (GB)
H06 0-6 0-6 0-4 / 0-4 0-6 0-1 8-240
H13 0-6 0-13 0-8 / 0-8 0-13 0-1 16-496

The z114 is available in two hardware models: M05 and M10. Introduced in July, 2011, this system is designed to extend the benefits of the zEnterprise System to the mid-range business segment. Like the z196, the z114 is fully compatible with the zBX and the URM and also features the mission-critical server design elements. The z114 features up to 14 cores (up to 10 configurable) with a clock speed of 3.8 GHz. The z114 is physically approximately half the size of the z196.

Model CPs IFLs zAAPs / zIIPs ICFs SAPs Spares zBX Memory (GB)
M05 0-5 0-5 0-2 / 0-2 0-5 2-4 0 0-1 8-120
M10 0-5 0-10 0-5 / 0-5 0-10 2-4 2 0-1 16-248

See also

External links

  • IBM's System z homepage
  • IBM's zEnterprise System homepage
  • IBM zEnterprise System – Datasheet
  • Review of IBM z196 Mainframe Architecture. David Kanter. 2011

References

  1. ^ "Introducing the zEnterprise System". IBM zEnterprise System Technical Introduction. IBM. Retrieved 2 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "IBM unveils faster, smaller mainframe".  
  3. ^ "IBM heaves new System z minis at mainframe shops".  
  4. ^ IBM unveils new “mainframe for the rest of us”
  5. ^ "IBM zEnterprise EC12 Technical Guide". IBM. August 28, 2012. Retrieved August 30, 2012. 
  6. ^ "IBM zEnterprise 114 Technical Guide". IBM. February 27, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  7. ^ Morgan, Timothy Prickett (July 19, 2010). "IBM zEnterprise 196 mainframe due July 22". The Register. Retrieved September 1, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b "IBM zEnterprise 196 - Specifications". IBM. Retrieved September 1, 2010. 
  9. ^ Dignan, Larry (July 21, 2010). "IBM unveils hybrid mainframe; 'System of system' eyes data center consolidation". ZDNet. Retrieved September 1, 2010. 
  10. ^ "zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension". IBM zEnterprise System Technical Introduction. IBM. Retrieved 2 October 2012. 
  11. ^ Taft, Darryl (July 22, 2010). "IBM Unveils New zEnterprise Mainframe". eWeek.com. Retrieved September 2, 2010. 
  12. ^ Thibodeau, Patrick (September 1, 2010). "Water cooling returns to IBM mainframe". Computer World. Retrieved September 1, 2010. 
  13. ^ "IBM zEnterprise EC12 Specifications".  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.