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Iidabashi Station

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Iidabashi Station

Iidabashi
飯田橋
Iidabashi Station Ōedo Line platforms
Location Chiyoda, Tokyo
Japan
Operated by
Line(s)
Other information
Station code E-06, N-10, T-06, Y-13
History
Opened 1928

Iidabashi Station (飯田橋駅 Iidabashi-eki) is a major interchange railway station which straddles Tokyo's Chiyoda, Shinjuku and Bunkyō wards. It was originally built as Iidamachi Station (albeit in a slightly different location), terminus of the then Kobu railway, precursor to today's Chūō Line. The Ōedo Line addition to the station in 2000 was designed by architect Makoto Sei Watanabe.

Contents

  • Lines 1
    • Above ground 1.1
    • Subway lines 1.2
  • Station layout 2
    • JR East 2.1
    • Tokyo Metro 2.2
    • Toei 2.3
  • Adjacent stations 3
  • History 4
  • Future developments 5
  • Passenger statistics 6
  • Surrounding area 7
  • See also 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

Lines

Iidabashi Station is served by the following above-ground and subway lines.

Above ground

Subway lines

Station layout

JR station name sign

The JR East station has one island platform, serving the up and down local lines; there is no platform for the parallel rapid double track (for longer-distance commuter and express Chūō Line trains). The station is located on the inside of the Outer Moat. It is elevated over Mejiro-dori, a major thoroughfare from the imperial palace towards Ikebukuro.

JR East

1  Chūō-Sōbu Line for Ochanomizu, Akihabara, and Chiba
2  Chūō-Sōbu Line for Yotsuya, Shinjuku, Nakano, and Mitaka

Tokyo Metro

1  Tokyo Metro Tozai Line for Ōtemachi, Nishi-Funabashi, Tsudanuma, and Tōyō-Katsutadai
2  Tokyo Metro Tozai Line for Takadanobaba, Nakano, and Mitaka
3  Tokyo Metro Yurakucho Line for Nagatachō, Yūrakuchō, Toyosu, and Shin-Kiba
4  Tokyo Metro Yurakucho Line for Ikebukuro, Kotake-Mukaihara, Wakōshi, Shinrinkōen, and Hannō
5  Tokyo Metro Namboku Line for Komagome, Ōji, Akabane-Iwabuchi, and Urawa Misono
6  Tokyo Metro Namboku Line for Tameike-Sannō, Shirokane-Takanawa, Meguro, and Hiyoshi

Toei

1  Toei Oedo Line for Tochōmae
2  Toei Oedo Line for Ryōgoku and Daimon

Adjacent stations

« Service »
Chūō-Sōbu Line
Ichigaya Local Suidōbashi
Tokyo Metro Tozai Line (T-06)
Kagurazaka (T-05) Kudanshita (T-07)
Tokyo Metro Yurakucho Line (Y-13)
Edogawabashi (Y-12) Ichigaya(Y-14)
Tokyo Metro Namboku Line (N-10)
Ichigaya (N-09) Kōrakuen (N-11)
Toei Oedo Line (E-06)
Ushigome-kagurazaka (E-05) Kasuga (E-07)

History

The present-day JR East station opened on 15 November 1928.[1]

Future developments

The JR East platforms are scheduled to be moved and rebuilt a distance of approximately 200 m along the line toward Shinjuku to eliminate the gaps between trains and platforms on the sharply curved (300 m radius) section of track.[2][3]

Passenger statistics

In fiscal 2013, the JR East station was used by an average of 91,196 passengers daily (boarding passengers only), making it the 46th-busiest JR East station.[4] Over the same fiscal year, the Tokyo Metro station was used by an average of 173,224 passengers daily (exiting and entering passengers), making it the twelfth-busiest station operated by Tokyo Metro.[5] In fiscal 2013, the Toei station was used by an average of 14,577 passengers daily (boarding passengers only).[6] The average daily passenger figures for JR East and Tokyo Metro in previous years are as shown below.

Fiscal year JR East Tokyo Metro
2000 91,145[7]
2005 88,647[8]
2010 90,363[9]
2011 90,763[10] 166,452[11]
2012 91,359[12] 169,830[13]
2013 91,196[4] 173,224[5]
  • Note that JR East figures are for boarding passengers only.

Surrounding area

Koishikawa Kōrakuen Garden can be reached by walking from this station.

See also

References

  1. ^ 各駅情報(飯田橋駅) [Station Information (Iidabashi Station)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 27 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "JR East to move Iidabashi Station by 200 meters to reduce safety risks". The Japan Times Online. Japan: The Japan Times Ltd. 3 July 2014. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  3. ^ JR中央線飯田橋駅ホームにおける抜本的な安全対策の着手について [Start on major safety improvements on JR Chuo Line Iidabashi Station platforms] (pdf). News release (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. 2 July 2014. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  4. ^ a b 各駅の乗車人員 (2013年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2013)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  5. ^ a b 各駅の乗降人員ランキング [Station usage ranking] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  6. ^ 各駅乗降人員一覧 [Station usage figures] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  7. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2000年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2000)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  8. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2005年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2005)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  9. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2010年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2010)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  10. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2011年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2011)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  11. ^ 駅別乗降人員順位表(2011年度1日平均) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2011)] (in Japanese). Japan: Tokyo Metro. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  12. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2012年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2012)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  13. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2012年) [Station usage ranking (2012)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 

External links

  • Iidabashi Station information (JR East) (Japanese)
  • Iidabashi Station information (Tokyo Metro) (Japanese)
  • Iidabashi Station information (Toei) (Japanese)
  • Refurbishment Design concept


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