World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Interdental papilla

Article Id: WHEBN0014087016
Reproduction Date:

Title: Interdental papilla  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Periodontal pathology, Periodontal abscess, Dental implant, Tongue, Human digestive system
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Interdental papilla

Interdental papilla
Details
Latin papilla gingivalis
Anatomical terminology

The interdental papilla, also known as the interdental gingiva, is the part of the gingiva that exists coronal to the free gingival margin on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the teeth. The interdental papillae fill in the area between the teeth apical to their contact areas to prevent food impaction; they assume a conical shape for the anterior teeth and a blunted shape buccolingually for the posterior teeth.[1]

A missing papilla is often visible as a small triangular gap between adjacent teeth. The relationship of interdental bone to the interproximal contact point between adjacent teeth is a determining factor in whether or not the interdental papilla will be present. If greater than 8mm exist between the interdental bone and the interproximal contact, usually no papilla will be present. If the distance is less than 5mm, than a papilla will usually be present.

With active periodontal disease, both the marginal gingiva and attached gingiva can become enlarged, especially the interdental papillae. This enlargement results from edema occurring in the lamina propria of the tissue caused by the inflammatory response.[2]



References
  1. ^ Illustrated Dental Embryology, Histology, and Anatomy, Bath-Balogh, Elsevier, 2011, page 123
  2. ^ Illustrated Embryology, Histology, and Anatomy, Bath-Balogh, Elsevier, 2011, page 125
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.