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Internet in Chile

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Title: Internet in Chile  
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Internet in Chile

The technical regulator for the Internet in Chile is the Ministry of Transportation and Telecommunications, through the Undersecretariat of Telecommunications (Subtel).

The Internet country code is .cl.[1]

Contents

  • Internet access 1
    • Internet usage 1.1
  • Connection speeds 2
  • Broadband market 3
    • Market share 3.1
    • Plans 3.2
      • VTR 3.2.1
      • Telefónica Chile 3.2.2
      • Entel 3.2.3
      • Gtd Manquehue 3.2.4
  • Network neutrality 4
  • References 5

Internet access

In 2011 there were 1.854 million Internet hosts in Chile.[1] According to the International Telecommunication Union, 45% of the population in Chile had access to the Internet in 2010.[2] The household penetration rate for fixed Internet connections stands at 39.01%, with 1,991,277 subscribers as of September 2011.[3]

Internet usage

According to a national survey[3] on telecommunication services consumption, published by Subtel in January 2009, 40.6% of Chileans use the Internet, while 59.1% do not.

Places where Chileans get online
Place % (*)
Home 45.6
Work 39.0
Cybercafé 29.0
Friends/relatives' house 18.4
University 12.8
School 8.9
Did not use 2.6
Others 1.6
Note: Multiple responses are allowed.
(*) Out of those who use the Internet.
Visits to a cybercafé during last week
Frequency % (*)
Once 41.7
2-5 times 39.3
6-10 times 7.9
More than 10 times 4.6
Don't know/No response 6.6
(*) Out of those who've visited a cybercafé in the last week.

Connection speeds

Speed Connections
(September 2011)[3]
%
≤56 kbit/s 1,320 0.1%
56 kbit/s-128 kbit/s 1,803 0.1%
128 kbit/s-256 kbit/s 11,250 0.6%
256 kbit/s-512 kbit/s 39,790 2.0%
512 kbit/s-1 Mbit/s 119,035 6.0%
1 Mbit/s-2 Mbit/s 569,317 28.6%
2 Mbit/s-5 Mbit/s 318,720 16.0%
5 Mbit/s-10 Mbit/s 669,600 33.6%
10 Mbit/s-100 Mbit/s 244,511 12.3%
100 Mbit/s-1 Gbit/s 15,207 0.8%
>1 Gbit/s 25 0.0%
Total fixed connections 1,990,578 100.0%

Broadband market

Market share

Company Connections[3] Market share
(September 2011)
Telefónica 834,778 41.9%
VTR Banda Ancha 758,313 38.1%
Claro Comunicaciones S.A. 177,952 8.9%
Telsur 102,180 5.1%
GTD Manquehue 39,366 2.0%
Entel-Chile S.A. 20,601 1.0%
Pacífico Cable 15,161 0.8%
CMET 14,535 0.7%
CTR 7,464 0.4%
Telcoy 7,425 0.4%
Telmex 4,547 0.2%
GTD Internet 4,188 0.2%
RTC 971 0.0%
Luzlinares 640 0.0%
Luzparral 550 0.0%
Netglobalis 537 0.0%
Fullcom 505 0.0%
AT&T Chile S.A. 502 0.0%
Inalámbrica S.A. 329 0.0%
Netline 310 0.0%
Firstcom 158 0.0%
Claro Holding S.A. 109 0.0%
Will S.A. 99 0.0%
E-Money 38 0.0%
Chilesat 10 0.0%
Chile.com 6 0.0%
Infonet 2 0.0%
Telmex Chile Networks 1 0.0%
Total connections 1,991,277 100.0%

Plans

Companies offering home use broadband connections include:

VTR

VTR,[4] Chile's largest cable company, offers several "always on" plans through cable modem (as of June 2011):

  • Flat-rate plans:
    • 1 Mbit/s (downstream)/512 kbit/s (upstream), US$21/month (3 GB monthly cap)
    • 2 Mbit/s/512 kbit/s, US$28/month (unlimited)
    • 6 Mbit/s/512 kbit/s, US$43/month (unlimited)
    • 15 Mbit/s/1 Mbit/s, US$51/month (unlimited)
    • 40 Mbit/s/2 Mbit/s, US$64/month (unlimited)
    • 120 Mbit/s/4 Mbit/s, US$150/month (unlimited)

Note: Exchange rate used: 1 US dollar = 467.73 Chilean pesos (May 2011 average)

Telefónica Chile

Telefónica Chile,[5] Chile's biggest phone company, offers several ADSL plans (as of November 10, 2008):

  • Flat-rate plans (using Ethernet and USB modems):
    • 300/200 kbit/s, US$34.75/month (regions I-X), US$49.31/month (regions XI-XII)
    • 600/300 kbit/s, US$80.84/month (regions XI-XII)
    • 1 Mbit/s/550 kbit/s, US$39.60 (not available in regions XI-XII)
    • 2 Mbit/s/550 kbit/s, US$44.45 (not available in regions XI-XII)
    • 4 Mbit/s/550 kbit/s, US$49.31 (not available in regions XI-XII)
    • 6 Mbit/s/550 kbit/s, US$54.16 (regions I-X)

Most plans above will see their download speed doubled or increased by December 2008. Prices will presumably stay unchanged.[6]

  • A pre-paid plan:
    • 1 Mbit/s/550 kbit/s, US$32.34 (2 hour extension for US$0.81, 24-hour extension for US$1.62)

Note: Exchange rate used: 1 US dollar = 618.39 Chilean pesos (October 2008 average)

Entel

Entel, another major telecommunications company, offers several plans through ADSL:

  • Flat-rate plans:
    • 200/64 kbit/s, US$37.30
    • 600/128 kbit/s, US$46.30
    • 1 Mbit/s/256 kbit/s, US$57
    • 2 Mbit/s/256 kbit/s, US$69.50
  • Wireless radio-based connections:
    • 512/128 kbit/s, US$50.90

Note: Exchange rate used: 1 US dollar = 559.77 Chilean pesos (2005 average)

Gtd Manquehue

Gtd Manquehue offers (through ADSL):

  • Flat-rate plans:
    • 128 kbit/s, US$27.50
    • 200 kbit/s, US$37.50
    • 400 kbit/s, US$42.80
    • 600 kbit/s, US$46.80
    • 1.3 Mbit/s, US$57.10
    • 2 Mbit/s, US$69.60
    • 4 Mbit/s, US$80.30

Note: Exchange rate used: 1 US dollar = 559.77 Chilean pesos (2005 average)

Network neutrality

On 13 June 2010, the National Congress of Chile, amended its telecommunications law in order to preserve network neutrality, becoming the first country in the world to do so.[7][8][9] The law, published on 26 August 2010, added three articles to the General Law of Telecommunications, forbidding ISPs from arbitrarily blocking, interfering with, discriminating, hindering or restricting an Internet user's right to use, send, receive or offer any legal content, application, service or any other type of legal activity or use through the Internet. ISPs must offer Internet access in which content is not arbitrarily treated differently based on its source or ownership.[10]

References

  1. ^ a b "Chile".  
  2. ^ Definitions of World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators, March 2010, International Telecommunication Union, March 2010. Accessed on 30 September 2011.
  3. ^ a b c d [1]
  4. ^ "Lo que nos gusta de la vida". VTR. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  5. ^ "Soluciones para Hogar - Telefónica Chile". Telefónica Chile. Archived from the original on 2008-08-22. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ "Net neutrality enshrined in Dutch law". The Guardian (London). Associated Press. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 23 June 2011. 
  8. ^ "Chile publica su ley que garantiza la neutralidad de la Red | Navegante". El Mundo. Spain. Retrieved 23 June 2011. 
  9. ^ "¿Quién quiere acabar con la neutralidad en la Red?". EL PAÍS. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  10. ^ "Law 20,453". Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
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