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Jürgen Kohler

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Jürgen Kohler

Jürgen Kohler
Personal information
Full name Jürgen Kohler
Date of birth (1965-10-06) 6 October 1965
Place of birth Lambsheim, West Germany
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Defender
Club information
Current team
SC Hauenstein (manager)
Youth career
1975–1981 TB Jahn Lambsheim
1982–1983 SV Waldhof Mannheim
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983–1987 SV Waldhof Mannheim 95 (6)
1987–1989 1. FC Köln 57 (2)
1989–1991 Bayern Munich 55 (6)
1991–1995 Juventus 102 (8)
1995–2002 Borussia Dortmund 191 (14)
Total 500 (36)
National team
1983–1984 West Germany U-18 8 (1)
1985–1987 West Germany U-21 11 (0)
1986–1998 Germany 105 (2)
Teams managed
2002–2003 Germany U-21
2005–2006 MSV Duisburg
2008 VfR Aalen
2012 Bonner SC U-19
2013–2015 SpVgg EGC Wirges
2015– SC Hauenstein[1]

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

† Appearances (goals)

Jürgen Kohler (born 6 October 1965 in Lambsheim) is a World Cup-winning German centre back footballer and manager. Kohler has retired from professional sports, but still occasionally plays for Alemannia Adendorf in the Kreisliga C (the 11th tier of German club football).[2] Since October 2013, he is in charge of Rheinlandliga team SpVgg EGC Wirges.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
  • Style of play 2
  • Coaching career 3
  • Career statistics 4
    • International goals 4.1
  • Honors 5
    • Club 5.1
    • National 5.2
    • Individual 5.3
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Playing career

He enjoyed a lengthy career at the highest level with exactly 500 top flight league matches,[3] playing primarily as a centre back in the German Bundesliga, and in the Italian Serie A, achieving notable success both at domestic and international level with Bayern Munich, Borussia Dortmund and Juventus. At international level, he represented the (West) German national team, with which he also enjoyed much success: he was a member of the teams that won the 1990 FIFA World Cup and the 1996 UEFA European Championship, as well as the teams that reached the 1988 UEFA European Championship semi-final and the 1992 UEFA European Championship final; he also represented his country at the 1994 and 1998 FIFA World Cups. However, Kohler ended his professional career on a sad note by getting sent-off and directly causing Dortmund to concede a penalty in the UEFA Cup final against Feyenoord.[4]

Style of play

Regarded as one of the best defenders of his generation, Kohler was a physically strong centre-back, who was famed for his defensive perception, anticipation, quick reactions, marking, and prowess in the air, which also made him a goal threat during set-pieces; he was also known for his composure when in possession, and his ability to play the ball out of defence.[4]

Coaching career

After his playing career was over, he has managed the German under-21 side, and became sports director of Bayer Leverkusen on 31 March 2003, quitting this post on 29 June 2004. On 17 December 2005, he was appointed the coach of MSV Duisburg. On 28 August 2008, Kohler signed a three-year contract as manager of German 3rd Liga club VfR Aalen. However, on 16 November 2008, he retired due to a heart condition from the coaching job. He continued to work as director of sports for Aalen, but was sacked on 5 May 2009.

In April 2013, he started to work as director of sports for his former club SV Waldhof Mannheim.

In August 2006, he turned down the opportunity to coach the Ivory Coast national team.[5]

Career statistics

[6]
Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB Ligapokal Europe Total
1983–84 Waldhof Mannheim Bundesliga 5 0
1984–85 26 2
1985–86 32 1
1986–87 32 3
1987–88 Köln Bundesliga 30 3
1988–89 27 0
1989–90 Bayern Munich Bundesliga 26 2
1990–91 29 4
Italy League Coppa Italia League Cup Europe Total
1991–92 Juventus Serie A 27 3
1992–93 29 1
1993–94 27 3
1994–95 19 1
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB Ligapokal Europe Total
1995–96 Borussia Dortmund Bundesliga 29 5
1996–97 30 2
1997–98 23 3
1998–99 29 2
1999–00 30 2
2000–01 28 0
2001–02 22 0
Country Germany 398 28
Italy 102 8
Total 500 36

[7]

Germany national team
Year Apps Goals
1986 2 0
1987 9 0
1988 11 0
1989 2 0
1990 10 0
1991 6 0
1992 10 0
1993 10 0
1994 13 0
1995 5 0
1996 10 1
1997 7 0
1998 10 1
Total 105 2

International goals

Scores and results list Germany's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 4 June 1996 Carl-Benz-Stadion, Mannheim  Liechtenstein 6–0 9–1 Friendly
2. 18 February 1998 Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex, Muscat  Oman 2–0 2–0 Friendly

Honors

Club

National

Individual

References

  1. ^ "Kohler wird trainer bei Oberligist Hauenstein" (in German). DFB. 23 March 2015. 
  2. ^ "Irre! Weltmeister Jürgen Kohler kickt jetzt in der Kreisliga C" (in German). bild.de. 15 July 2009. Retrieved 8 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Matthias Arnhold (26 July 2012). "Jürgen Kohler – Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 2 August 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Stefano Bedeschi (7 October 2013). "Gli eroi in bianconero: Jürgen KOHLER" (in Italian). Tutto Juve. Retrieved 18 September 2015. 
  5. ^ "Kohler lehnt Angebot der Elfenbeinküste ab" (in German). Welt Online. 30 August 2006. Retrieved 8 October 2011. 
  6. ^ Jürgen Kohler at National-Football-Teams.com
  7. ^ Roberto Mamrud (9 November 2002). "Jürgen Kohler – Century of International Appearances". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 2 August 2012. 

External links

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