Kcnmb2

Potassium large conductance calcium-activated channel, subfamily M, beta member 2
PDB rendering based on 1jo6.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: RCSB
Identifiers
KCNMB2 Gene
RNA expression pattern
KCNMB2, ball and chain domain
solution structure of the cytoplasmic n-terminus of the bk beta-subunit kcnmb2
Identifiers
Symbol KcnmB2_inactiv
Pfam InterPro IPR015382

Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit beta-2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KCNMB2 gene.[1][2]

MaxiK channels are large conductance, voltage and calcium-sensitive potassium channels which are fundamental to the control of smooth muscle tone and neuronal excitability. MaxiK channels can contain two distinct subunits: a pore-forming alpha subunit and a modulatory beta subunit. Each complete MaxiK channel contains four copies of the pore-forming alpha subunit and up to four beta subunits. The protein encoded by the KCNMB2 gene is an auxiliary beta subunit which influences the calcium sensitivity of MaxiK currents and, following activation of MaxiK current, causes persistent inactivation. The subunit encoded by the KCNMB2 gene is expressed in various endocrine cells, including pancreas and adrenal chromaffin cells. It is also found in the brain, including the hippocampus. The KCNMB2 gene is homologous to three other genes found in mammalian genomes: KCNMB1 (found primarily in smooth muscle), KCNMB3, and KCNMB4 (the primary brain MaxiK auxiliary subunit).[2]

Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit beta-2 comprises two domains. An N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, the ball and chain domain, which is responsible for the fast inactivation of these channels,[3] and a C-terminal calcium-activated potassium channel beta subunit domain. The N-terminal domain only occurs in calcium-activated potassium channel subunit beta-2, while the C-terminal domain is found in related proteins.

See also

References

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

This article incorporates text from the IPR015382

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.