Laryngeal cavity

Laryngeal cavity
Sagittal section of the larynx and upper part of the trachea.
Coronal section of larynx and upper part of trachea.
Latin cavitas laryngis
Gray's subject #236 1078

The laryngeal cavity (cavity of the larynx) extends from the laryngeal entrance downwards to the lower border of the cricoid cartilage where it is continuous with that of the trachea.

It is divided into two parts by the projection of the vocal folds, between which is a narrow triangular fissure or chink, the rima glottidis.

The portion of the cavity of the larynx above the vocal folds is called the vestibule; it is wide and triangular in shape, its base or anterior wall presenting, however, about its center the backward projection of the tubercle of the epiglottis.

It contains the ventricular folds, and between these and the vocal folds are the ventricles of the larynx.

The portion below the vocal folds is called the infraglottic cavity. It is at first of an elliptical form, but lower down it widens out, assumes a circular form, and is continuous with the tube of the trachea.

External links

  • http://www.emory.edu/ANATOMY/AnatomyManual/pharynx.html

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.