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List of B-52 Units of the United States Air Force

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Title: List of B-52 Units of the United States Air Force  
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List of B-52 Units of the United States Air Force

May 2007 photo of the Boeing RB-52B-5-BO Stratofortress 52-005 with tail colour for the Yellowtails Squadron - 330th BS/93rd BW. Initially retired to Davis-Monthan AFB in February 1966, was used as a maintenance trainer at Lowry Technical Training Center until April 1982. Put on static display in 1984 and now part of the Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum, Denver, Colorado.
Strategic Air Command (1955–1992)
Air Combat Command (1992–2010)

The Boeing B-52 Stratofortress has been operational with the United States Air Force since 1955. This list is of the units it was assigned to, and the bases it was stationed.

In addition to the USAF, A single RB-52B (52-008) was flown by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) until it was retired on 17 December 2004. It now is on static display at the west gate of Edwards AFB, California. One other B-52H (61-0025) was flown for many years by the Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards, and was transferred to NASA on 30 July 2001 as a replacement for the RB-52B. On 9 May 2008, that aircraft was flown for the last time to Sheppard AFB, Texas where it became a GB-52H maintenance trainer, never to fly again.

Current USAF B-52 units

The only active operational model of the B-52 is the B-52H. It is currently stationed at two USAF bases, flown by three wings:[1]

11th Bomb Squadron (B-52H, Tail Code: LA, Gold Tail Stripe)
20th Bomb Squadron (B-52H, Tail Code: LA, Blue Tail Stripe)
96th Bomb Squadron (B-52H, Tail Code: LA, Red Tail Stripe)
23d Bomb Squadron (B-52H, Tail Code: MT, Red Tail Stripe)
69th Bomb Squadron (B-52H, Tail Code: MT, Black Tail Stripe)
93d Bomb Squadron (B-52H, Tail Code: BD, Blue/Gold Chex Tail Stripe)
343d Bomb Squadron

Historical USAF B-52 units

Historical Strategic Air Command MAJCOM B-52 units

Strategic Wings wings were established by Strategic Air Command in the late 1950s to disburse its B-52 bombers over a larger number of bases, thus making it more difficult for the Soviet Union to knock out the entire fleet with a surprise first strike. A 4-Digit MAJCOM wing, they were considered as temporary, provisional units.

Beginning in 1962, in order to retain the lineage of the Strategic Wings as combat units and to perpetuate the lineage of many currently inactive bombardment units with illustrious World War II records, Headquarters SAC received authority from Headquarters USAF to discontinue its MAJCOM strategic wings that were equipped with combat aircraft and to activate AFCON units, most of which were inactive at the time which could carry a lineage and history. Component units were also redesignated to historically-linked units of the newly established wing. Therefore the history, lineage and honors of the World War II historical units were bestowed upon the newly established wing upon activation.

Provisional B-52 units

Strategic Wing (Provisional), 72 Andersen AFB, Guam
Provisional SAC MAJCOM unit, June 1972 – November 1973
Bombardment Wing (Provisional), 4133 Andersen AFB, Guam
Provisional SAC MAJCOM unit, February 1966 – July 1970 (Replaced by 43d Strategic Wing)
4525d Strategic Wing Kadena AB, Okinawa
SAC MAJCOM unit, April 1967 – April 1970 (Replaced by 376th Strategic Wing) Note: The 376th Strategic Wing operated B-52D's until Aug 1970.
4258th Strategic Wing, U-Tapao RTNAF, Thailand
SAC MAJCOM unit, April 1967 – April 1970 (Replaced by 307th Strategic Wing)

Andersen AFB & Kadena AB started primarily with B-52F's and later B-52D's aircraft; aircrew and support personnel deployed from CONUS B-52 wings on a rotational basis / U-TAPAO AB started operation after the B-52D became the primary mission aircraft; SW(P)72 at Andersen AFB was only equipped with B-52G's

801st Provision Bombardment Wing, Moron AFB, Spain
Activated in January 1991. Inactivated March 1991.
Composed of B-52G aircraft and personnel
806th Provisional Bombardment Wing, RAF Fairford, England
Activated in January 1991. Inactivated March 1991.
Composed of B-52G aircraft and personnel from the 62d, 340th, 524th, and 668th Bombardment Squadrons
1701st Provisional Air Refueling Wing, Prince Abdulla AB, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Activated in August 1990. Inactivated March 1991.
Air refueling wing of KC-10s, KC-135s. Had 6 B-52Gs from 60th Bombardment Squadron (January-March 1991)
1703d Provisional Air Refueling Wing, King Khalid Military City, Saudi Arabia
Activated in August 1990. Inactivated March 1991.
Air refueling wing of KC-135s. Had 7 B-52Gs from 69th Bombardment Squadron (October 1990 – March 1991)
1708th Provisional Bombardment Wing, Prince Abdulla AB, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Activated in August 1990. Inactivated March 1991.
Composed of B-52G aircraft and personnel from the 69th and 524th Bombardment Squadrons (August 1990 – March 1991)
Additional B-52G aircraft and personnel from the 69th, 524th, 596th, 328th and 668th Bombardment Squadrons (December 1990 – March 1991)
4300th Provisional Bombardment Wing, Diego Garcia AB, British Indian Ocean Territories
Activated in January 1991. Inactivated March 1991
Composed of B-52G aircraft and personnel from the 69th and 328th Bombardment Squadrons
20th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron
23d Expeditionary Bomb Squadron
40th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron
96th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron

References

  1. ^ Mehuron, Tamar A., Assoc. Editor. 2009 USAF Almanac, Fact and Figures, Air Force Magazine, May 2009.
  • Strategic Air Command.com article source.
  • Donald, David, Ed. US Air Force Air Power Directory, AIRtime Publishing Inc., Westport, CT, 1992

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