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List of Major League Soccer stadiums

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List of Major League Soccer stadiums

Major League Soccer (MLS) is the premier professional soccer league in the United States and Canada. From 2012–2014, it consisted of 19 teams—16 in the United States and 3 in Canada. The league used 18 stadiums, with the Los Angeles Galaxy and Chivas USA sharing the StubHub Center. In 2015, the league will have 20 teams-17 in the United States and 3 in Canada. It will use 20 stadiums, with Chivas USA folding. From the inauguration in 1996, MLS teams used multi-purpose stadiums, often shared with National Football League (NFL) or college football teams. Because of lower attendance, these stadiums had parts tarped off to artificially reduce capacity. Starting in 1999 with the construction of Columbus Crew Stadium, the league has constructed soccer-specific stadiums which are tailor-made for soccer and which have smaller capacity.

Stadiums

The following is a list of current primary MLS stadiums.

Soccer-specific stadium
Actual capacity
(Artificially reduced capacity)
double-dagger Stadiums with a retractable roof
Image Stadium Team(s) Location First MLS Year Capacity Opened Surface Field Dimensions Ref(s)
Avaya Stadium San Jose Earthquakes San Jose, California 2015 18,000 2015 Grass Unknown [1]
BBVA Compass Stadium Houston Dynamo Houston, Texas 2012 22,039 2012 Grass 8,050 square yards (6,730 m2) 115 by 70 yards (105 m × 64 m) [2][3]
BC Place double-dagger Vancouver Whitecaps FC Vancouver, British Columbia 2011 54,320
(21,000)
1983 Polytan 8,775 square yards (7,337 m2) 117 by 75 yards (107 m × 69 m) [4][5]
BMO Field Toronto FC Toronto, Ontario 2007 21,859 2007 Grass 8,510 square yards (7,120 m2) 115 by 74 yards (105 m × 68 m) [6]
CenturyLink Field Seattle Sounders FC Seattle, Washington 2009 67,000
(38,300)
2002 FieldTurf 8,436 square yards (7,054 m2) 114 by 74 yards (104 m × 68 m) [7][8]
Citrus Bowl Orlando City SC Orlando, Florida 2015 65,438
(TBD)
1936 Grass 114 by 74 yards (104 m × 68 m) [9]
Columbus Crew Stadium Columbus Crew SC Columbus, Ohio 1999 20,145 1999 Grass 8,625 square yards (7,212 m2) 115 by 75 yards (105 m × 69 m) [10]
Dick's Sporting Goods Park Colorado Rapids Commerce City, Colorado 2007 17,424 2007 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [11]
Gillette Stadium New England Revolution Foxborough, Massachusetts 2002 68,756
(20,000)
2002 FieldTurf 8,625 square yards (7,212 m2) 115 by 75 yards (105 m × 69 m) [12]
PPL Park Philadelphia Union Chester, Pennsylvania 2010 18,500 2010 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [13]
Providence Park Portland Timbers Portland, Oregon 2011 20,674 1926 FieldTurf 8,250 square yards (6,900 m2) 110 by 75 yards (101 m × 69 m) [14]
RFK Stadium D.C. United Washington, D.C. 1996 47,359
(19,647)
1961 Grass 8,250 square yards (6,900 m2) 110 by 75 yards (101 m × 69 m) [15]
Red Bull Arena New York Red Bulls Harrison, New Jersey 2010 25,000 2010 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [16]
Rio Tinto Stadium Rio Tinto Stadium Real Salt Lake Sandy, Utah 2008 20,213 2008 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [17]
Saputo Stadium Montreal Impact Montreal, Quebec 2012 20,801 2008 Grass 9,240 square yards (7,730 m2) 120 by 77 yards (110 m × 70 m) [18]
Sporting Park Sporting Kansas City Kansas City, Kansas 2011 18,467 2011 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [19]
StubHub Center Los Angeles Galaxy Carson, California 2003 27,000 2003 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [20]
Toyota Park Chicago Fire Bridgeview, Illinois 2006 20,000 2006 Grass 9,000 square yards (7,500 m2) 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [21]
Toyota Stadium FC Dallas Frisco, Texas 2005 20,295 2005 Grass 8,658 square yards (7,239 m2) 117 by 74 yards (107 m × 68 m) [22][23]
Yankee Stadium New York City FC New York, NY 2015 49,642
(27,000)
2009 Grass 110 by 70 yards (101 m × 64 m) [24]

Other stadiums used

The following is a list of other current stadiums used by MLS teams for the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup, CONCACAF Champions League, premiere, special, or international friendly matches.

Soccer-specific stadium
Artificially reduced capacity
dagger Domed Stadiums
double-dagger Stadiums with a retractable roof
Image Stadium Team(s) Location Year Since Use Capacity Opened Surface Ref(s)
Kezar Stadium San Jose Earthquakes San Francisco, California 2012- 3,888 1990 Grass
Lincoln Financial Field Philadelphia Union Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2010- 37,500 2003 Grass [25]
Maryland SoccerPlex Stadium D.C. United Boyds, Maryland unknown 3,200 2000 Bluegrass
Rogers Centre double-dagger Toronto FC Toronto, Ontario 2012- 47,568 1989 AstroTurf GameDay Grass 3D
Olympic Stadium dagger Montreal Impact Montreal, Quebec 2012- 66,308 1976 Team Pro EF RD
Stanford Stadium San Jose Earthquakes Stanford, California 2011– 50,000 2006 Grass
Levi's Stadium San Jose Earthquakes Santa Clara, California 2014–2019 48,765 2014 Bermuda Bandera/Ryegrass mixture [26]
Starfire Sports Complex Stadium Seattle Sounders FC Tukwila, Washington 2009– 4,500 2005 FieldTurf

Future stadiums

The following is a table of future MLS stadiums that are undergoing construction or renovation, or have been approved for construction or renovation.

Other existing MLS teams (DC United and New England Revolution) as well as MLS expansion teams (New York City FC, Miami, and Los Angeles) have announced their desire to build a new soccer-specific stadium, but none of those teams have finalized construction plans.

Stadium Team Location Capacity Construction
begin
Likely
MLS Opening
Surface Field Dimensions Ref
Orlando City Stadium Orlando City SC Orlando, FL 19,500[27] 2014 2016 Grass Unknown [28]
New Atlanta Stadium Atlanta MLS team Atlanta, GA 29,322 2014 2017 Turf Unknown [29]

Former stadiums

The following is a list of former MLS stadiums.

Artificially reduced capacity
Image Stadium Team(s) Location Used for MLS Capacity Opened Surface Field Dimensions Ref(s)
Arrowhead Stadium Kansas City Wizards Kansas City, Missouri 1996–2007 79,451
(20,269)[note 1]
1972 Grass 110 by 69 yards (101 m × 63 m)
Buck Shaw Stadium San Jose Earthquakes Santa Clara, California 2008–2014 10,525 1962 Grass 8,510 square yards (7,120 m2) 115 by 74 yards (105 m × 68 m) [30]
Cardinal Stadium Chicago Fire Naperville, Illinois 2002–2003 15,000 1999 FieldTurf unknown [31]
CommunityAmerica Ballpark Kansas City Wizards Kansas City, Kansas 2008–2010 10,385 2003 Grass unknown
Cotton Bowl Dallas Burn Dallas, Texas 1996–2002, 2004 92,100
(25,425)
1932 Grass 116 by 71 yards (106 m × 65 m)
Dragon Stadium Dallas Burn Southlake, Texas 2003 11,000 2001 unknown
Empire Field Vancouver Whitecaps FC Vancouver, British Columbia 2011 20,500 2010 FieldTurf unknown [32]
Foxboro Stadium New England Revolution Foxborough, Massachusetts 1996–2001 60,292
(24,871)
1971 Grass unknown
Giants Stadium New York Red Bulls
NY/NJ MetroStars
East Rutherford, New Jersey 1996–2009 78,148
(25,576)
1976 Grass; FieldTurf unknown
Invesco Field at Mile High Colorado Rapids Denver, Colorado 2002–2006 76,125
(17,500)
2001 Grass 116 by 74 yards (106 m × 68 m)
Mile High Stadium Colorado Rapids Denver, Colorado 1996–2001 76,273
(17,500)
1948 Grass unknown
Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum San Jose Earthquakes Oakland, California 2008–2009 63,132
(47,416)
1966 Grass unknown [30]
Ohio Stadium Columbus Crew Columbus, Ohio 1996–1998 89,841
(25,243)[note 2]
1922 Grass unknown [33][34][35]
Rice-Eccles Stadium Real Salt Lake Salt Lake City, Utah 2005–2008 45,634
(24,521)
1927 FieldTurf 120 by 70 yards (110 m × 64 m)
Robertson Stadium Houston Dynamo Houston, Texas 2005–2011 32,000
(25,462)
1941 Grass unknown
Rose Bowl Los Angeles Galaxy Pasadena, California 1996–2002 104,091
(26,000)
1922 Grass 120 by 70 yards (110 m × 64 m)
Soldier Field Chicago Fire Chicago, Illinois 1998–2002, 2004–2005 61,500
(24,955)
1924 Grass 116 by 70 yards (106 m × 64 m)
Spartan Stadium San Jose Earthquakes San Jose, California 1996–2005 31,218
(19,166)
1933 Grass 110 by 70 yards (101 m × 64 m) [30]

Defunct teams

Artificially reduced capacity
Image Stadium Team(s) Location Used for MLS Capacity Opened Surface Field Dimensions Ref(s)
Lockhart Stadium Miami Fusion F.C. Fort Lauderdale, Florida 1998–2002 20,450 1959 FieldTurf 116 by 75 yards (106 m × 69 m)
Houlihan's Stadium Tampa Bay Mutiny Tampa, Florida 1996–1998 16,000[note 3] 1967 Grass unknown
Raymond James Stadium Tampa Bay Mutiny Tampa, Florida 1999–2002 32,000[note 4] 1998 Grass 115 by 72 yards (105 m × 66 m)
StubHub Center Chivas USA Carson, California 2005–2014 (Chivas USA) 18,800 CHV 2003 Grass 120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [36]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ For most of the Wizards' history at Arrowhead, the team did not sell tickets in most of the stadium. At different times, either one side of the stadium or the upper seating bowl was tarped off.
  2. ^ Ohio Stadium has a capacity for 102,329, but this was artificially reduced to 25,243 for regular games. The Crew's attendance record is however 31,000
  3. ^ Portion used by MLS, full NFL capacity: 65,857
  4. ^ Portion used by MLS, full NFL capacity: 65,857

References

  1. ^ "San Jose Earthquakes: Team makes inroads with fans, plans to 'strive to be best' on field".  
  2. ^ "Dynamo Stadium 2012".  
  3. ^ "BBVA Compass Stadium's pitch size draws ire".  
  4. ^ "BC Place".  
  5. ^ Constantineau, Bruce (September 24, 2011). "Empire falls, Whitecaps hope BC Place provides kick-start". The Province. Retrieved September 24, 2011. 
  6. ^ "BMO Field".  
  7. ^ Romero, José Miguel (January 23, 2010). "Success in the second season won't be easy for Sounders FC".  
  8. ^ Smith, Rob (July 19, 2002). "Close to the action: Fans come first in Seahawks Stadium".  
  9. ^ "MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER AWARDS EXPANSION TEAM TO ORLANDO". Orlandocitysoccer.com. Orlando City SC. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Crew Stadium".  
  11. ^ "An A-Z Directory of Facility Services for our Guests". Dick's Sporting Goods Park. Retrieved May 24, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Gillette Stadium Overview". revolutionsoccer.net. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  13. ^ "PPL Park".  
  14. ^ Orr, Michael A. (December 31, 2013). "Timbers Expanding Width of Field to 75 Yards". Retrieved January 1, 2014. 
  15. ^ "U.S. vs. Germany: RFK or FedEx?". The Washington Post. January 9, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Stadium Facts". Red Bull Arena. Retrieved January 24, 2014. 
  17. ^ "2010 MLS Fact Sheet". Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  18. ^ Passionate" Montreal named as 19th MLS city""".  
  19. ^ "Sporting Park Fact Sheet". Retrieved January 23, 2013. 
  20. ^ "The Home Depot Center".  
  21. ^ "toyotapark.com - A-Z/FAQ's". Archived from the original on April 27, 2007. Retrieved May 4, 2007. 
  22. ^ "About Toyota Stadium". FC Dallas. 
  23. ^ "FC Dallas Training Report: 3/23". March 23, 2011. 
  24. ^ "New York City FC outline plans for Yankee Stadium's baseball-to-soccer conversion". MLSsoccer.com. Major League Socce. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  25. ^ "Philadelphia Union to face DC in home opener".  
  26. ^ "Earthquakes have 5-year deal with 49ers to play at Levi's". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved August 3, 2014. 
  27. ^ Schlueb, Mark. "Here's what Orlando's new MLS soccer stadium will look like". OrlandoSentinel.com. Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  28. ^ Wiebe, Andrew. """Orlando City president expects new stadium to have "most intense atmosphere in the whole of MLS. mlssoccer.com. Retrieved November 20, 2013. 
  29. ^ Carlisle, Jeff. "Atlanta introduced as MLS' 22nd team". espnfc.com. ESPN FC. Retrieved April 17, 2014. 
  30. ^ a b c "History".  
  31. ^ "North Central College Facilities Info". Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved May 4, 2007. 
  32. ^ "Empire Field".  
  33. ^ Merz, Craig (April 17, 1996). "Crew Won't Increase 'Shoe Size; for Now, Capacity Will Remain as Is".  
  34. ^ "Crew Wins 8th Straight; More than 31,000 Fans See Columbus' 2–0 Win Over the MetroStars".  
  35. ^ "Ohio Stadium".  
  36. ^ "The Home Depot Center".  
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