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Make My Video

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Make My Video

Make My Video is a series of three video games by Digital Pictures in 1992 for the Sega Mega-CD and personal computers. The games featured three songs from the respective musical groups, and the player edited pre-made clips to make a new music video. The games were universally panned and were financial disasters.

In each game players are given instructions of what they should include in the video, and then the song is played while the video is edited live. Players can change between video clips available by pressing the buttons on the controller, and choose from clips of videos of the group, stock footage, movie clips, and special effects.

Games

INXS

INXS: Make My Video


Developer(s) Digital Pictures
Publisher(s) Sony Imagesoft
Platform(s) Sega Mega-CD
Release date(s) October 15, 1992
Mode(s) Single-player
Distribution 1 Compact disc

INXS: Make My Video was created as a video game by Digital Pictures in 1992.[1] The game puts the player in control of editing the music videos for the band INXS on the songs: Heaven Sent, Baby Don’t Cry, and Not Enough Time.[1] All three songs are from the 1992 album Welcome to Wherever You Are, and the box art for the game is taken from the album.[2]

Kris Kross

Kris Kross: Make My Video


Developer(s) Digital Pictures
Publisher(s) Sony Imagesoft
Platform(s) Sega Mega-CD
Release date(s) 1992
Genre(s) Music Video Editor

Kris Kross: Make My Video was created as a video game by Digital Pictures in 1992,[1] due to the popularity of the rap group Kris Kross.

The game puts the player in control of editing the music videos for the group on the songs: Jump, I Missed the Bus, and Warm It Up.[1][3]

Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch

Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch: Make My Video


Developer(s) Digital Pictures
Publisher(s) Sega
Platform(s) Sega Mega-CD
Release date(s) October 15, 1992
Genre(s) Music Video Editor
Mode(s) U-Direct, Edit Challenge

Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch: Make My Video was created as a video game by Digital Pictures in 1992.

The game puts the player in control of editing the music videos for hip-hop artist Mark Wahlberg and his group Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch on the songs: "Good Vibrations", "I Need Money", and "You Gotta Believe".

Reception

All three games turned out to be huge failures, both financially and critically.[4] Kris Kross is on Seanbaby's Crapstravaganza list of the 20 worst games of all time at #18.[5]

Game Informer gave Marky Mark 0 out of 10, the lowest score a game ever received from the magazine.[6] A 2006 PC World article rated the game as number 8 on their list of the 10 worst games of all time.[7] In 2011 Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch was named by WatchMojo.com as the worst launch title of all time.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Make My Video: INXS for Sega CD.". 
  2. ^  
  3. ^  
  4. ^ "Kris Kross – Listen free at". Last.fm. 2008-11-21. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  5. ^ "#18 on the worst games of all time". Seanbaby.com. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  6. ^ "Marky Mark: Make My Video Reviews". Gamerankings.com. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  7. ^ The 10 Worst Games of All Time, pcworld.ca, Emru Townsend, October 23, 2006

External links

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