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Mary Lambert

Mary Lambert
Born (1951-10-13) October 13, 1951
Helena, Arkansas, U.S.
Occupation Film director
Spouse(s) Jerome Gary[1]

Mary Lambert (born October 13, 1951) is an American film director. She has directed music videos, television episodes, and feature films, mainly in the horror genre.

Contents

  • Life and career 1
  • Filmography 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Life and career

Lambert was born in Helena, Arkansas, the daughter of Martha Kelly and Jordan Bennett Lambert III, a rice and cotton farmer.[2] Her younger sister is former U.S. Senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas.[1] Lambert graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a B.F.A.

Lambert directed Chris Isaak's first music video "Dancin'" and Janet Jackson's "Nasty" and "Control" music videos. She also directed videos for Annie Lennox, Mick Jagger, The Go-Go's, Whitney Houston, Alison Krauss, Live, Mötley Crüe, Queensrÿche, Sting, Debbie Harry, Tom Tom Club and others. She directed many of Madonna's early videos including "Borderline", "Like a Virgin", "Material Girl", "La Isla Bonita", and "Like a Prayer".

In 1987 she released her debut feature, the stylish and controversial Siesta, starring Ellen Barkin and Jodie Foster. It was nominated for the IFP Spirit Award for best first feature. She is known to horror fans for directing the 1989 adaptation of Stephen King's novel Pet Sematary and its sequel, Pet Sematary Two.[3] More recently, Lambert directed 2005 Urban Legends: Bloody Mary and the 2011 Syfy horror film Mega Python vs. Gatoroid.[4]

She directed the 1993 Digital Pictures FMV video game Double Switch.

Filmography

Director
As herself

References

  1. ^ a b Ross, Andy. "Sundance features Clarksdale visit". 
  2. ^ "Arkansas Congressional Directory". Govnotes.com. Retrieved February 5, 2012. 
  3. ^ Mary Lambert directed the film’s sequel, Pet Sematary 2, followed by Urban Legends: Bloody Mary.
  4. ^ "Mega Python vs. Gatoroid Adds a Monkee". 

External links

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