Native Building Workers Act, 1951

Native Building Workers Act, 1951
Act to provide for the training and registration of native building workers, for the regulation of their employment and conditions of employment, and for other incidental matters.
Citation Act No. 27 of 1951
Enacted by Parliament of South Africa
Date of Royal Assent 26 April 1951
Date commenced 10 October 1951
Date repealed 1 August 1980
Administered by Minister of Labour
Repealing legislation
Industrial Conciliation Amendment Act, 1980
Status: Repealed

The Native Building Workers Act, 1951 (Act No. 27 of 1951; subsequently renamed the Bantu Building Workers Act, 1951 and the Black Building Workers Act, 1951) formed part of the apartheid system of racial segregation in South Africa. It legalized the training of blacks in skilled labor in the construction industry, but limited the places in which they were permitted to work. Sections 15 and 19 made it an offense for blacks to work in the employ of whites performing skilled labor in their homes.It was repealed by section 11 of the Industrial Conciliation Amendment Act, Act No 95 of 1980.[1]

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