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New Albany, Indiana

City of New Albany, Indiana
City
Flag of City of New Albany, Indiana
Flag
Official seal of City of New Albany, Indiana
Seal
Nickname(s): Sunny Side of Louisville, River City, Gateway to the South and North West, Kentuckiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Indiana
County Floyd
Government
 • Mayor Jeff Gahan (D)
Area[1]
 • Total 15.11 sq mi (39.13 km2)
 • Land 14.94 sq mi (38.69 km2)
 • Water 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
Elevation 449 ft (137 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 36,372
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 36,462
 • Density 2,434.5/sq mi (940.0/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 47150-47151
Area code(s) 812 & 930
FIPS code 18-52326[4]
GNIS feature ID 0440013[5]
Website www.cityofnewalbany.com

New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, United States, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Kentucky. The population was 36,372 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Floyd County.[6] It is bounded by I-265 to the north and the Ohio River to the south, and is considered part of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Statistical Area. The mayor of New Albany is Jeff Gahan, a Democrat; he was elected in 2011.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Early history 1.1
    • Boom town 1.2
    • 20th century 1.3
      • Education innovation 1.3.1
      • Ohio River flood 1.3.2
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Attractions 4
  • Education 5
  • Notable people 6
  • See also 7
  • Footnotes 8
  • Further reading 9
  • External links 10

History

The land of New Albany was officially granted to the United States after the George Rogers Clark in 1779. For his services Clark was awarded large tracts of land in Southern Indiana including most of Floyd County. After the war Clark sold and distributed some of his land to his fellow soldiers. The area of New Albany ended up in the possession of Col. John Paul.

The Cedar Bough Place Historic District, Culbertson Mansion, DePauw Avenue Historic District, Division Street School, East Spring Street Historic District, Hedden's Grove Historic District, Mansion Row Historic District, New Albany Downtown Historic District, New Albany National Cemetery, Old Pike Inn, Scribner House, Shelby Place Historic District, Woodbine, and William Young House are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[8][9][10] The New Albany and Salem Railroad Station and Sweet Gum Stable were formerly listed, but both have been demolished.

Early history

New Albany was founded in July 1813 when three brothers from the East Coast—Joel, Abner, and Nathaniel Scribner—arrived at the Falls of the Ohio and named the site after the city of Albany, New York.[11] They purchased the land from Col. John Paul. New Albany was platted by John Graham on the land owned by the Scribner brothers. In 1814 Joel and Mary Scribner built their home in New Albany, the Scribner House[12] still stands today.

New Albany was incorporated as a town in 1817 as part of Clark County. In 1819, three years after Indiana was admitted as a state, New Albany became the seat of government for newly established Floyd County.[13] A courthouse was finally built in 1824. New Albany was incorporated as a city in 1839. It would remain one of the largest cities in the mid-west for the next 50 years.

Boom town

A Carnegie library in New Albany

The steamboat industry was the engine of the city's economy during the mid-19th century. At least a half-dozen shipbuilders were in operation and turned out a multitude of steamboats and packet boats, including the Robert E. Lee, Eliza Battle, the Eclipse, and the A.A. Shotwell. Shipbuilding was accompanied by a wide range of ancillary business including machine shops, foundries, cabinet and furniture factories, and silversmith shops. Its second largest business was the American Plate Glass Works. By 1850, New Albany was the largest city in Indiana due to its river contacts with the South. New Albany's size and economic influence overshadowed all of its neighboring cities, including Louisville.

In 1853 the New Albany High School opened, the first public high school in the state. The original school was built at the corner of West First Street and Spring Street. New Albany would also be the first in the state to create a consolidated school district several years later.

Before the Civil War, over half of Hoosiers worth over $100,000 lived in New Albany,[14] making it by far the wealthiest part of the state.

Ashbel P. Willard, governor of the state of Indiana and a native of New Albany, dedicated the Floyd County Fairgrounds in 1859. That year, the Indiana State Fair was held in New Albany. During the Civil War, the fairgrounds were converted to become Camp Noble and used as a muster point for the area's regiments.

In 1862, Abraham Lincoln established one of the first seven national cemeteries in New Albany for burying the many war dead.

A new larger courthouse was built in 1865 which was used until the 1960s when the current City-County courthouse was constructed, also the first in Indiana.

Town Clock Church

The Town Clock Church, now the Second Baptist Church, was used as the New Albany stop in the Underground Railroad.[15]

During the American Civil War the trade with the South dwindled, and after the War much of Indiana saw New Albany as too friendly to the South. The city never regained its stature, remaining a city of 40,000 with only its early Victorian Antebellum "Mansion-Row" buildings to remind itself of its boom period. New Albany's robust steamboat industry ended by 1870, with the last steamboat built in New Albany named, appropriately, the Robert E. Lee.

During the second half of the 19th century New Albany experienced an industrial boom despite the collapse of the steamboat industry. The advent of the railroad created economic opportunity for the city as a pork packing and locomotive repair center. A bridge was built across the Ohio River in 1886 providing a rail and road connection with Kentucky. American Plate Glass Works opened in 1865 which employed as many as 2,000 workers. When the factory relocated in 1893 New Albany lost a large part of its population and went into economic decline.

The Culbertson Mansion in New Albany

20th century

In the early 20th century, New Albany became a center of plywood and veneer, and its largest employer was the New Albany Veneering Company. By 1920, New Albany was the largest producer of plywood and veneer in the world with other producers including Indiana Veneer Panel Company and Hoosier Panel Company.

On March 23, 1917, a tornado struck the north side of New Albany, killing 45 persons.[16]

American Institute of Steel Construction.

Education innovation

Charles A. Prosser lived in New Albany for much of his life. Charles Allen Prosser School of Technology was named in honor of his accomplishments as the "father of vocational education." In the mid and late 20th century, New Albany became an innovator in using electronic media in education. New Albany High School, a public school, started WNAS-FM in 1949, which is the nation's oldest continuously operating high school radio station. In the late 1960s, Slate Run Elementary School started WSRS, a non-licensed student-produced closed circuit television service for its classrooms, one of the nation's first in an elementary school.

Ohio River flood

In January 1937, a major flood struck the region. New Albany, like the other river towns, had no flood walls and no methods of regulating the river. The Ohio River rose to 60.8 feet at New Albany, leaving most of the town under 10 or more feet of water for nearly three weeks. The flood would be the worst disaster to ever befall the city.

After the flood, New Albany was the first city in the region to begin construction on massive flood walls around the city. New Albany's flood walls would serve as examples for those that would later be constructed around Louisville and Clark County.

Geography

New Albany is located at (38.301935, -85.821442).[17]

According to the 2010 census, New Albany has a total area of 15.111 square miles (39.14 km2), of which 14.94 square miles (38.69 km2) (or 98.87%) is land and 0.171 square miles (0.44 km2) (or 1.13%) is water.[1]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 36,372 people, 15,575 households, and 9,175 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,434.5 inhabitants per square mile (940.0/km2). There were 17,315 housing units at an average density of 1,159.0 per square mile (447.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 85.8% White, 8.7% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 1.7% from other races, and 2.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.7% of the population.

There were 15,575 households of which 29.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.4% were married couples living together, 18.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.1% were non-families. 33.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.89.

The median age in the city was 37.1 years. 22.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.9% were from 25 to 44; 26.4% were from 45 to 64; and 13.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 37,603 people, 15,959 households, and 10,054 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,571.1 people per square mile (992.4/km2). There were 17,098 housing units at an average density of 1,169.1 per square mile (451.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 84.00% White, 12.93% African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.67% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. 1.36% of the population is Hispanic (Hispanics can be of any race).

There were 15,959 households out of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.0% were non-families. 30.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 88.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,923, and the median income for a family was $41,993. Males had a median income of $31,778 versus $24,002 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,365. About 11.4% of families and 13.7% of the population were below the Poverty threshold, including 21.6% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.

Attractions

New Albany's Main Street features a large collection of late 19th century mansions from the city's heyday as a shipbuilding center. The centerpiece is the Culbertson Mansion, a three-story French Second Empire Style structure, which is today an Indiana state memorial.[18]

Every October, the downtown area of New Albany hosts the Harvest Homecoming festival, one of the largest annual events in the state. Festivities begin on the first weekend of October, but the main part, consisting of midway rides, shows, and booths lining the downtown streets, lasts from Thursday-Sunday of the second weekend in October.

Education

Indiana University Southeast is located in the city.

New Albany Floyd County Consolidated School Corporation operates public schools. The Children's Academy of New Albany is the public preschool program.[19]

Elementary schools in the city limits include:

  • Fairmont Elementary School
  • Green Valley Elementary School
  • Mt. Tabor Elementary School
  • S. Ellen Jones Elementary School
  • Slate Run Elementary School

Grant Line Elementary School is in an unincorporated area near New Albany.[20]

The middle schools in New Albany are Hazelwood Middle School and Nathaniel Scribner Middle School.[21][22] New Albany High School is the city's senior high school with the city being in its attendance boundary.[23]

The Greater Louisville Regional Japanese Saturday School (グレータールイビル日本語補習校 Gurētā Ruibiru Nihongo Hoshūkō), a Japanese weekend supplementary school, is affiliated with IUS's Japan Center.[24] It was established in January 1988 and holds its classes at Hillside Hall; its office is elsewhere in New Albany.[25]

Notable people

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b "G001 - Geographic Identifiers - 2010 Census Summary File 1".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places.  
  9. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 12/27/10 through 12/30/10. National Park Service. 2011-01-07. 
  10. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 12/27/10 through 12/30/10. National Park Service. 2011-01-07. 
  11. ^ Kleber, John E. (2001). The Encyclopedia of Louisville. University Press of Kentucky. p. 651.  
  12. ^ Today the house is owned by the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution
  13. ^ "The History of New Albany". Wayback.archive.org. 2009-07-25. Retrieved 2013-11-19. 
  14. ^ Miller, Harold, "Industrial Development of New Albany, Indiana", Economic Geography, January, 1938, p.48
  15. ^ "Historic New Albany". Historic New Albany. Retrieved 2013-11-19. 
  16. ^ "NEW ALBANY TORNADO, 1917". IN.gov. Retrieved 19 April 2015. 
  17. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  18. ^ Kleber, John E. (2001). The Encyclopedia of Louisville. University Press of Kentucky. p. 234.  
  19. ^ Home page. The Children's Academy of New Albany. Retrieved on April 9, 2015. "1111 Pearl Street New Albany, IN 47150"
  20. ^ Home page. Grant Line Elementary School. Retrieved on April 9, 2015. "4811 Grant Line Road New Albany, IN 47150"
  21. ^ Home page. Hazelwood Middle School. Retrieved on April 9, 2015.
  22. ^ Home page. Scribner Middle School. Retrieved on April 9, 2015.
  23. ^ New Albany High School District (Archive). New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corporation. Retrieved on April 9, 2015.
  24. ^ "Japan Center." Indiana University Southeast. Retrieved on April 1, 2015.
  25. ^ "グレータールイビル日本語補習校概要." Greater Louisville Regional Japanese Saturday School. Retrieved on March 31, 2015. "所在地 4201 Grant Line Road, KV-225 New Albany, Indiana 47150 U.S.A." and "グレータールイビル日本語補習校は、校舎として、インディアナ大学サウスイースト校の「ヒルサイド・ホール」を借りています。事務所とは別棟になっています。学校への道順については、この地図を御覧下さい。"
  26. ^ "The European Homepage For The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope - The man behind the name". Spacetelescope.org. Retrieved 2013-11-19. 

Further reading

  • Lawrence M. Lipin, Producers, Proletarians, and Politicians: Workers and Party Politics in Evansville and New Albany, Indiana, 1850-87. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

External links

  • City of New Albany, Indiana website
  •  "New Albany".  
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