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Nouveau roman

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Title: Nouveau roman  
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Subject: French literature, Avant-garde, 20th-century French literature, Antinovel, WikiProject Novels/Novel categorization
Collection: French Literature, Literary Genres
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Nouveau roman

The Nouveau Roman (French pronunciation: ​, new novel) is a type of 1950s French novel that diverged from classical literary genres. Émile Henriot coined the title in an article in the popular French newspaper Le Monde on May 22, 1957[1] to describe certain writers who experimented with style in each novel, creating an essentially new style each time. Most of the founding authors were published by Les Éditions de Minuit with the strong support of Jérôme Lindon.

Alain Robbe-Grillet, an influential theorist as well as writer of the Nouveau Roman, published a series of essays on the nature and future of the novel which were later collected in Pour un Nouveau Roman. Rejecting many of the established features of the novel to date, Robbe-Grillet regarded many earlier novelists as old-fashioned in their focus on plot, action, narrative, ideas, and character. Instead, he put forward a theory of the novel as focused on objects: the ideal nouveau roman would be an individual version and vision of things, subordinating plot and character to the details of the world rather than enlisting the world in their service.

Despite the assertions of nouveauté, this vision of the novel can be construed as developing from earlier writers' suggestions and practice. Joris-Karl Huysmans, ninety years before, had suggested how the novel might be depersonalised; more recently, Franz Kafka had shown that conventional methods of depicting character were not essential; James Joyce had done the same for plot; and absurdist writers had engaged with some of the themes which preoccupied writers of the nouveau roman.

Seminar with Jean Ricardou and Claude Simon, Cerisy (France)

Alain Robbe-Grillet is elected a member of the Académie française on 25 March 2004, succeeding Maurice Rheims at seat No. 32. Claude Simon is often identified with the nouveau roman movement, he is the 1985 Nobel Laureate in Literature. Jean Ricardou is the theorist of the nouveau roman literary movement.[2]

Contents

  • Authors in the style of the Nouveau Roman 1
  • The Nouveau Roman and the Left Bank 2
  • Bibliography 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Authors in the style of the Nouveau Roman

The Nouveau Roman and the Left Bank

The Nouveau Roman style also left its mark on screen as writers Marguerite Duras and Alain Robbe-Grillet became involved with the Left Bank film movement (often labelled as part of the French new wave). Their collaboration with director Alain Resnais resulted in critical successes such as Hiroshima mon amour (1958) and Last Year in Marienbad (1961). They would later go on to direct their own films.[3]

Bibliography

  • Bernard Luscans, La représentation dans le nouveau nouveau roman, Chapel Hill, Université de Caroline du Nord, 2008.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ EMILE HENRIOT (May 1957). "LA JALOUSIE, d'Alain Robbe-Grillet TROPISMES, de Nathalie Sarraute". Le Monde. 
  2. ^ Sirvent, Michel (2001). Jean Ricardou. De Tel Quel au Nouveau Roman textuel.  
  3. ^ Clouzot, Claire, Le cinéma français depuis la nouvelle vague, Fernand Nathan/Alliance Française, 1972
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