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Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district

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Title: Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district  
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Subject: United States congressional delegations from Pennsylvania, Tom Marino, Chris Carney, John R. Farr, United States House of Representatives elections, 2010
Collection: Congressional Districts of Pennsylvania, Government of Bradford County, Pennsylvania, Government of Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, Government of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, Government of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, Government of Montour County, Pennsylvania, Government of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, Government of Pike County, Pennsylvania, Government of Snyder County, Pennsylvania, Government of Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, Government of Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, Government of Tioga County, Pennsylvania, Government of Union County, Pennsylvania, Government of Wayne County, Pennsylvania, Government of Wyoming County, Pennsylvania
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Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district

Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district
 Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Tom Marino (RWilliamsport)
Area 6,557.85[1] mi2 (16,984.75 km2)
Distribution 44.65% urban, 55.35% rural
Population (2000) 646,534[2]
Median income $35,996
Ethnicity 96.3% White, 1.9% Black, 0.5% Asian, 1.4% Hispanic, 0.0% Native American, 0.1% other
Cook PVI R+12[3]

Pennsylvania's 10th Congressional District is located in the central and northeast regions of the state. The district was one of the 12 original districts created prior to the John McCain beat Senator Barack Obama here by a margin of 54 percent to 45 percent. Nonetheless, Carney easily won reelection as a Democrat the same year McCain won the district. However, in the 2010 midterm elections, Marino unseated Carney by a 55%–45% margin.

Contents

  • District boundaries 2003-2013 1
  • Recent elections 2
    • 2006 election 2.1
    • 2008 election 2.2
    • 2010 election 2.3
  • Better Know A District 3
  • List of representatives 4
    • 1795–1813: One seat 4.1
    • 1813–1823: Two seats 4.2
    • 1823–present: One seat 4.3
  • Historical district boundaries 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • Notes 8
  • External links 9

District boundaries 2003-2013

The Pennsylvania 10th was the third-largest congressional district in the state. The district encompassed the following counties and areas:[5][6]

Recent elections

2006 election

United States House of Representatives elections, 2006: Pennsylvania District 10[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Christopher Carney 110,115 52.90
Republican Don Sherwood 97,862 47.01

2008 election

United States House of Representatives elections, 2008: Pennsylvania District 10[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Christopher Carney 160,837 56.33
Republican Chris Hackett 124,681 43.67

2010 election

United States House of Representatives elections, 2010: Pennsylvania District 10[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Tom Marino 109,603 55
Democratic Christopher Carney 89,170 45

Better Know A District

List of representatives

District created in 1795 from Pennsylvania's At-large congressional district

1795–1813: One seat

Cong
ress
Years Representative Party Electoral history
4 March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1799
David Bard Democratic-
Republican
5
6 March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Henry Woods Federalist
7
8 March 4, 1803 –
October 15, 1804
William Hoge Democratic-
Republican
Resigned
March 4, 1803 –
October 15, 1804
Vacant
November 2, 1804 –
March 3, 1805
John Hoge Democratic-
Republican
Elected to finish his brother's term
9 March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1807
John Hamilton Democratic-
Republican
10 March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1809
William Hoge Democratic-
Republican
11 March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1813
Aaron Lyle Democratic-
Republican
Redistricted to 12th district
12

1813–1823: Two seats

Cong
ress
Years   Seat A   Seat B
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
13 March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
Isaac Smith Democratic-Republican Jared Irwin Democratic-Republican
14 March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
William Wilson Democratic-Republican
15 March 4, 1817 –
?, 1817
David Scott Democratic-Republican Resigned before Congress assembled
?, 1817 –
October 14, 1817
Vacant
October 14, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
John Murray Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Scott's term
16 March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
George Denison Democratic-Republican
17 March 4, 1821 –
?, 1821
William Cox Ellis Democratic-Republican Resigned before Congress assembled
?, 1821 –
October 9, 1821
Vacant
October 9, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Thomas Murray, Jr. Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Ellis's term

1823–present: One seat

Cong
ress
Years Representative Party Electoral history
18 March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
James S. Mitchell Jacksonian
Democratic-Republican
Redistricted from the 4th district
19 March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Jacksonian
20 March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1833
Adam King Jacksonian Lost re-election
21
22
23 March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
William Clark Anti-Masonic
24
25 March 4, 1837 –
March 4, 1839
Luther Reily Democratic
26 March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
William Simonton Whig
27
28 March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1849
Richard Brodhead Democratic Retired
29
30
31 March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
Milo M. Dimmick Democratic Retired
32
33 March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Ner Middleswarth Whig
34 March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
John C. Kunkel Opposition
35 March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Republican Retired
36 March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
John W. Killinger Republican Retired
37
38 March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
Myer Strouse Democratic Retired
39
40 March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1871
Henry L. Cake Republican Lost renomination
41
42 March 4, 1871 –
March 4, 1875
John W. Killinger Republican Retired
43
44 March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
William Mutchler Democratic Retired
45 March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
Samuel A. Bridges Democratic Retired
46 March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
Reuben K. Bachman Democratic Retired
47 March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1885
William Mutchler Democratic Retired
48
49 March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
William H. Sowden Democratic Retired
50
51 March 4, 1889 –
March 16, 1901
Marriott Brosius Republican Elected in 1888
Re-elected in 1890
Re-elected in 1892
Re-elected in 1894
Re-elected in 1896
Re-elected in 1898
Re-elected in 1900
Died
52
53
54
55
56
57
57 November 5, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
Henry B. Cassel Republican Elected to finish Brosius's term
Redistricted to the 9th district
58 March 4, 1903 –
February 10, 1904
George Howell Democratic Lost election contest
February 10, 1904 –
March 3, 1905
William Connell Republican Contested Howell's election
59 March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
Thomas H. Dale Republican Lost re-election
60 March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1911
Thomas D. Nicholls Independent
Democratic
Retired
61
62 March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1919
John R. Farr Republican Lost re-election
63
64
65
66 March 4, 1919 –
February 25, 1921
Patrick McLane Democratic Lost election contest
February 25, 1921 –
March 3, 1921
John R. Farr Republican Contested McLane's election
Lost renomination
67 March 4, 1921 –
September 26, 1922
Charles R. Connell Republican Elected in 1920
Died
September 26, 1922 –
March 4, 1923
Vacant
68 March 4, 1923 –
December 5, 1929
William W. Griest Republican Redistricted from the 9th district
Died
68
69
70
71
71 December 5, 1929 –
January 28, 1930
Vacant
January 28, 1930 –
January 3, 1945
J. Roland Kinzer Republican Redistricted to the 9th district
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79 January 3, 1945 –
July 17, 1946
John W. Murphy Democratic Redistricted from the 11th district
Resigned to become U.S. District Judge
80 November 5, 1946 –
January 3, 1949
James P. Scoblick Republican Lost renomination
81 January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
Harry P. O'Neill Democratic Lost renomination
82
83 January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1959
Joseph L. Carrigg Republican Redistricted from the 14th district
Lost renomination
84
85
86 January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1961
Stanley A. Prokop Democratic Lost renomination
87 January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1963
William Scranton Republican Elected Governor of Pennsylvania
88 January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1999
Joseph M. McDade Republican
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106 January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2007
Don Sherwood Republican Lost re-election
107
108
109
110 January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2011
Christopher Carney Democratic Lost re-election
111
112 January 3, 2011 –
present
Tom Marino Republican Incumbent
113

Historical district boundaries

2005 - 2013

See also

References

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

Notes

  1. ^ "Congressional Districts by Urban/Rural Population & Land Area (109th Congress)" (PDF). 2000 United States Census. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 January 2007. 
  2. ^ "Census Data: Pennsylvania, District 10". 2000 United States Census (Washington Post). Retrieved 11 January 2007. 
  3. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-10. 
  4. ^ "2006 Election Results: U.S. House". New York Times. November 8, 2006. Retrieved 9 November 2006. 
  5. ^ "109th Congressional District Wall Maps". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 January 2007. 
  6. ^ "Pennsylvania 109th Congressional Districts and Counties". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 January 2007. 
  7. ^ a b c "State Races: Pennsylvania". Pennsylvania 2006 Midterm Election. The Green Papers. Retrieved 16 March 2010. 

External links

  • Congressional redistricting in Pennsylvania

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