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Pick-up line

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Title: Pick-up line  
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Subject: Seduction, Flattery, The Big Bang Theory (season 4), Seduction community, Femme Fatale (Britney Spears album)
Collection: Clichés, Interpersonal Relationships, Seduction
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Pick-up line

A pick-up line or chat-up line is a conversation opener with the intent of engaging an unfamiliar person for romance or dating. Overt and sometimes humorous displays of romantic interest, pick-up lines advertise the wit of their speakers to their target listeners. They are most commonly used by men who pick up women.

Pick-up lines range from straightforward conversation openers such as introducing oneself, providing information about oneself, or asking someone about their likes[1] and common interests,[2] to more elaborate attempts including flattery[3] or humour.[4]

Novices are advised to avoid standardised and hackneyed lines (particularly those resembling country songs[5]) and to put their opening in an interrogative form, if possible.[6]

Pick-up lines are evolving due to new technologies and media, which can involve smartphone apps or even TV programs and movies. In fact, new digital generation pick-up lines are constantly being created.

Most commonly however, pick-up lines are a way for people (typically men) to try charming women into having sexual intercourse with them. They are often sexual or suggestive, and it is apparent what the intentions of the author are just by listening to the content of the pick-up line.

Contents

  • See also 1
  • References 2
  • Further reading 3
  • External links 4

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ Eric Berne, Games People Play (1964) p. 155-6
  3. ^ Eric Berne, Sex in Human Loving (1970) p. 238
  4. ^
  5. ^ J. Browne, Dating for Dummies (2011) p. 86
  6. ^ J. Sidnell, Conversation Analysis (2011) p. 14

Further reading

External links

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