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RAF Scorton

RAF Scorton
Aerial photograph of RAF Scorton looking north, 26 June 1941.
ICAO: none
Summary
Airport type Military
Operator Royal Air Force
United States Army Air Forces
Location Scorton
Coordinates
Map
RAF Scorton is located in North Yorkshire
RAF Scorton
RAF Scorton
Location in North Yorkshire
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
00/00 0 0 Concrete
00/00 0 0 Concrete
00/00 0 0 Concrete

RAF Scorton was a satellite station of RAF Catterick during the Second World War. It was located near the village of Scorton in North Yorkshire, England. It was used by the Royal Air Force, the Royal Canadian Air Force, and the United States Army Air Forces Ninth Air Force during the war.

Overview

The location was chosen for its flat terrain and its situation close to the now disbanded Eryholme-Richmond branch line that had a sub branch line to Catterick Garrison and RAF Catterick.

The famous No. 56 Squadron RAF flew Spitfires from Scorton during the Second World War. Also the USAAF 422d and 425th Night Fighter Squadrons were stationed at Scorton flying the Northrup P-61 "Black Widow" fighter

Operational Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force units and aircraft

USAAF use

Northrop P-61A-10-NO Black Widow Serial 42-5565 "Double Trouble" of the 422d Night Fighter Squadron.
Northrop P-61A-10-NO Black Widow Serial 42-5570 of the 425th Night Fighter Squadron.

Scorton was known as USAAF Station AAF-425 for security reasons by the USAAF during the war, and by which it was referred to instead of location.

422d and 425th Night Fighter Squadrons

The USAAF Ninth Air Force transferred two P-61 Black Widow night interceptor squadrons to Scorton from RAF Charmy Down near Bath in Somerset to train and fly with the RAF night fighter Operational Training Unit assigned there. Initially flying de Havilland Mosquitoes, their first P-61 arrived at Scorton on 23 May 1944 and their first assignment was to chase night-flying V-1 "buzz bombs".

The Black Widows would be vectored to intercept approaching V-1s by ground control. Since the V-1 was a little faster than the P-61, the Black Widow had to approach the V-1 from behind and go into a slight dive in order to catch up with it.

The first Black Widow V-1 "kill" took place on 16 July 1944, credited to pilot Herman Ernst and radar operator Edward Kopsel of the 422nd Night Fighter Squadron. One of the greatest dangers involved in killing V-1s was the possibility of getting too close to the flying bomb when one fired at it, running the risk of damage to their own plane if the bomb exploded when hit.

After D-Day, the USAAF Black Widows moved to Advanced Landing Grounds at Maupertus (A-15) (422d NFS) near Cherbourg and Vannes (A-33N) (425th NFS) in Brittany France to intercept German night fighters and bombers attacking Allied positions. Although several interceptions

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