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Retrofit

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Retrofit

For other uses, see Retrofit Films and Retrofit Section 25 album.

Retrofitting refers to the addition of new technology or features to older systems.

  • power plant retrofit, improving power plant efficiency / increasing output / reducing emissions
  • home energy retrofit, the improving of existing buildings with energy efficiency equipment
  • seismic retrofit, the process of strengthening older buildings in order to make them earthquake resistant

Benefits of a retrofit

  • Saving on capex while benefiting from new technologies
  • Optimization of existing plant components
  • Adaptation of the plant for new or changed products
  • Increase in piece number and cycle time
  • Guaranteed spare parts availability[1]

Manufacturing

Principally retrofitting describes the measures taken in the manufacturing industry to allow new or updated parts to be fitted to old or outdated assemblies (like blades to wind turbines).

The production of retrofit parts is necessary in manufacture when the design of a large assembly is changed or revised. If, after the changes have been implemented, a customer (with an old version of the product) wishes to purchase a replacement part then retrofit parts and assembling techniques will have to be used so that the revised parts will fit suitably onto the older assembly.

Another example of this is car customizing, where older vehicles are fitted with new technologies: power windows, cruise control, remote keyless systems, electric fuel pumps, etc.

Environmental management

The term is also used in the field of environmental engineering, particularly to describe construction or renovation projects on previously built sites, to improve water quality in nearby streams, rivers or lakes. The concept has also been applied to changing the output mix of energy from power plants to cogeneration in urban areas with a potential for district heating.

Sites with extensive impervious surfaces (such as parking lots and rooftops) can generate high levels of stormwater runoff during rainstorms, and this can damage nearby water bodies. These problems can often be addressed by installing new stormwater management features on the site, a process that practitioners refer to as stormwater retrofitting. Stormwater management practices used in retrofit projects include rain gardens, permeable paving and green roofs.[2] (See also stream restoration.)

See also

References

External links

  • Diesel Retrofit in Europe.
  • Diesel retrofit glossary.
  • Diesel Retrofits Help Clean Regions' Air - Maryland Department of Environment
  • Diesel Emission Control Strategies Verification - California Air Resources Board
  • GRINNELL Grooved Products
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