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Right lobe of liver

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Title: Right lobe of liver  
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Right lobe of liver

Right lobe of liver
Posterior and inferior surfaces of the liver. (Right lobe labeled at upper right.)
Details
Latin lobus hepatis dexter
Anatomical terminology

The right lobe is much larger than the left; the proportion between them being as six to one.

It occupies the right hypochondrium, and is separated from the left lobe on its ventral surface by the falciform ligament; on its posterior surface by the ligamentum venosum for the cranial (upper) half, and by the ligamentum teres hepatis (aka Round ligament of liver) for the caudal (under) half. The ligamentum teres hepatis turns around the inferior marging of the liver to come out ventral in the falciform ligament.

The right lobe is of a somewhat quadrilateral form. Its under and posterior surfaces being marked by three fossæ: the fossa for the portal vein, the fossa for the gall-bladder and the fossae for the inferior vena cava. These separate the right lobe in two smaller lobes on its left posterior part: the quadrate lobe and the caudate lobe.

See also

References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

External links

  • Anatomy diagram: 12581.000-1 at Roche Lexicon - illustrated navigator, Elsevier
  • Anatomy photo:37:02-0201 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Abdominal Cavity: Inspection of the Abdominal Viscera in situ"
  • Anatomy photo:38:12-0204 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "The Visceral Surface of the Liver"
  • Cross section image: pembody/body8a - Plastination Laboratory at the Medical University of Vienna



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