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Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vrhbosna

 

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vrhbosna

Archdiocese of Vrhbosna
Archidioecesis Vrhbosnensis o Seraiensis
Vrhbosanska nadbiskupija
Location
Country Bosnia and Herzegovina
Ecclesiastical province Sarajevo
Metropolitan Sarajevo
Statistics
Area 22,401 km2 (8,649 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2010)
1,960,000[1]
198,012[1] (10.1%)
Parishes 153[1]
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Roman Rite
Established July 5, 1881
Cathedral Sacred Heart Cathedral
Patron saint Sacred Heart
Secular priests 165[1]
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Vinko Puljić
Suffragans Franjo Komarica, Pero Sudar
Auxiliary Bishops Pero Sudar
Vicar General Luka Tunjić
Archdeacons The Very Rev. Ilija Miškić
The Very Rev. Mato Zovkić
Msgr. Bosiljko Rajić
Msgr. Ante Meštrović
Map
Archdiocese of Vrhbosna (blue)
Archdiocese of Vrhbosna (blue)
Website
http://vrhbosanska-nadbiskupija.org

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vrhbosna is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina. Its episcopal see is the city of Sarajevo, capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Skopje is a suffragan of the Archdiocese.

Vrhbosna's cathedral is the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Sarajevo. Cardinal Vinko Puljić currently serves as the archbishop of the archdiocese. Bishop Pero Sudar serves as the auxiliary bishop.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Ordinaries 2
    • Archbishops of Vrhbosna 2.1
    • Auxiliary Bishops of Vrhbosna 2.2
  • Administrative division 3
  • Saints, Blesseds & Venerables of Vrhbosna 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

History

The Diocese of Bosnia, a Roman Catholic Diocese erected in the 11th century, existed in the territory of Bosnia before the Ottoman conquest of Bosnia, but then moved north, to Đakovo. The Franciscan Province of Bosna Srebrena instead became the main agency of Catholicism in Bosnia during the Ottoman period. This lasted until the Austro-Hungarian occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1878. On July 5, 1881, Pope Leo XIII established the archdiocese again, with see in Sarajevo and subordinate dioceses in Banja Luka and Mostar.

The Bosnian War, which resulted in the Siege of Sarajevo on the archdiocese's home, gravely impacted the archdiocese. In the war's aftermath, repairs had to be completed to many damaged churches and chapels. The biggest struggle has been the exodus of Croatian Catholics from the region, causing the Catholic population in the diocese to drop to less than half of what it was before the conflict.

Ordinaries

Archbishops of Vrhbosna

Archbishop of Vrhbosna
From Until Incumbent Notes
1881 1918 Josip Stadler Elected in September and confirmed in November 1881, consecrated on 20 November 1881. Died in office on 8 December 1918.
1922 1960 Ivan Šarić Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 8 April 1908 and consecrated on 28 May 1908. Appointed Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 2 May 1922. Died in office on 16 July 1960.
1960 1970 Marko Alaupović Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 21 May 1950 and consecrated on 24 September 1950. Appointed Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 7 September 1960. Resigned on 13 January 1970 and died on 8 April 1979.
1970 1976 Smiljan Franjo Čekada Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 6 June 1939 and consecrated on 6 August 1939. Translated to Skopje on 18 August 1940. Appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 12 June 1967. Succeeded Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 13 January 1970. Died in office on 16 July 1976.
July 1976 June 1977 Sede vacante
1977 1990 Marko Jozinović Appointed Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 27 June 1977 and consecrated on 23 October 1977. Resigned on 19 April 1990 and died on 11 August 1994.
1990 present Vinko Cardinal Puljić Formerly Priest of Banja Luka. Appointed Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 19 November 1990 and consecrated on 6 January 1991. Elevated to Cardinal on 26 November 1994. Participated on Conclave 2005 and Conclave 2013.
Sources:[2][3][4][5][6][7]

Auxiliary Bishops of Vrhbosna

Auxiliary Bishops of Vrhbosna
From Until Incumbent Notes
1897 1898 Anton Bonaventura Jeglič Appointed in August 1897, consecrated on 12 Sep 1897. Translated to Ljubljana in March 1898.
1908 1922 Ivan Šarić Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 8 April 1908 and consecrated on 28 May 1908. Appointed Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 2 May 1922.
1939 1940 Smiljan Franjo Čekada Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 6 June 1939 and consecrated on 6 August 1939. Translated to Skopje on 18 August 1940.
1950 1960 Marko Alaupović Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 21 May 1950 and consecrated on 24 September 1950. Appointed Archbishop of Vrhbosna on 7 September 1960.
1970 1986 Tomislav Jablanović Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 16 November 1970 and consecrated on 8 April 1971. Died in office on 10 September 1986.
1993 present Pero Sudar Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Vrhbosna on 28 May 1993 and consecrated on 7 January 1994.
Sources:[3][4][5][6][8][9][10]

Administrative division

Archdeaconry Deaneries
Fojnica
Kreševo
Rama
Sarajevo
Sutjeska
Guča Gora
Bugojno
Travnik
Žepče
Plehan
Derventa
Tuzla
Usora
Tolisa
Brčko
Dobor
Šamac

Saints, Blesseds & Venerables of Vrhbosna

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Archdiocese of Vrhbosna {Sarajevo}".  
  2. ^ "Archbishop Josef Stadler".  
  3. ^ a b "Archbishop Ivan Šarić".  
  4. ^ a b "Archbishop Marko Jozinović".  
  5. ^ a b "Archbishop Smiljan Franjo Cekada".  
  6. ^ a b "Archbishop Marko Alaupovic".  
  7. ^ "Vinko Cardinal Puljic".  
  8. ^ "Bishop Pero Sudar".  
  9. ^ "Archbishop Antonio Bonaventura Jeglič".  
  10. ^ "Bishop Tomislav Jablanovic".  

External links

  •  "Archdiocese of Serajevo".  

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