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Route 310 (MTA Maryland)

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Route 310 (MTA Maryland)

Route 310 is a commuter bus route operated by the Maryland Transit Administration and contracted to Dillon's Bus Service, operating between Columbia and Baltimore, Maryland. The line operates between Columbia and Downtown Baltimore, using the I-95 corridor as its primary route.

History

Route 310 was conjoined with a second service, Route 311. Though each line had a distinct route in the Columbia area, both shared I-95 as the express portion of their route, and both routes had their schedules printed in a joint timetable. The two lines provided a combined 34 trips each weekday, mostly during peak hours.[1] Though MTA does not provide full-time bus service between Columbia and Baltimore, It is possible to travel between these points regularly on Howard Transit's Silver line and the Baltimore Light Rail, a trip that takes a few hours in one direction.

Original proposal to combine Routes 310 and 311 into a single line to be identified as Route 310 was in 2005 as part of the Greater Baltimore Bus Initiative. Under the new plan, only 12 trips would be provided each weekday, plus one midday trip on Friday, and service would not be provided to certain points in the Columbia area.[2] The plan was opposed by the Howard County government, and no changes have been made to the line ever since.

In late 2008, MTA proposed to eliminate both Routes 310 and 311, which were used by a combined 435 riders,[3] and encouraged riders to use MARC Train service in lieu of buses. In 2009, Route 311 was discontinued and the number of trips on Route 310 was reduced. This came after an initial plan to completely eliminate both lines.[4] Route 150 absorbed some of this service.

References

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