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Samarium(III) oxide

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Title: Samarium(III) oxide  
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Subject: Oxides, Samarium compounds, Samarium(II) chloride, Sesquioxides, Carbon trioxide
Collection: Oxides, Samarium Compounds, Sesquioxides
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Samarium(III) oxide

Samarium(III) oxide
Samarium(III) oxide
Names
Other names
samarium sesquioxide
Identifiers
 Y
ChemSpider  Y
EC number 235-043-6
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem
Properties
Sm2O3
Molar mass 348.72 g/mol
Appearance yellow-white crystals
Density 8.347 g/cm3
Melting point 2,335 °C (4,235 °F; 2,608 K)
insoluble
Structure
cubic
Hazards
not listed
Related compounds
Other anions
Samarium(III) chloride
Other cations
Promethium(III) oxide, Europium(III) oxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 Y  (: Y/N?)

Samarium(III) oxide (Sm2O3) is a chemical compound.

Contents

  • Uses 1
  • Preparations 2
  • Reactions 3
  • References 4

Uses

Samarium(III) oxide is used in optical and infrared absorbing glass to absorb infrared radiation. Also, it is used as a neutron absorber in control rods for nuclear power reactors. The oxide catalyzes dehydration of acyclic primary alcohols to aldehydes and ketones. Another use involves preparation of other samarium salts. [1]

Preparations

Samarium(III) oxide may be prepared by two methods:

1. thermal decomposition of samarium(III) carbonate, hydroxide, nitrate, oxalate or sulfate:

Sm2(CO3)3 → Sm2O3 + 3 CO2

2. by burning the metal in air or oxygen at a temperature above 150 °C:

4 Sm + 3 O2 → 2 Sm2O3

Reactions

Samarium(III) oxide dissolves in mineral acids, forming salts upon evaporation and crystallization:

Sm2O3 + 6 HCl → 2 SmCl3 + 3 H2O

The oxide can be reduced to metallic samarium by heating with a reducing agent, such as hydrogen or carbon monoxide, at elevated temperatures.

References

  1. ^ Pradyot Patnaik. Handbook of Inorganic Chemicals. McGraw-Hill, 2002, ISBN 0-07-049439-8


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