World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Simulation video game

 

Simulation video game

Part of a series on:
Simulation video games

A simulation video game describes a diverse super-category of video games, generally designed to closely simulate aspects of a real or fictional reality.

A simulation game attempts to copy various activities from real life in the form of a game for various purposes such as training, analysis, or prediction. Usually there are no strictly defined goals in the game, with players instead allowed to freely control a character.[1] Well-known examples are war games, business games, and role play simulation.

From three basic types of strategic, planning, and learning exercises: games, simulations, and case studies, a number of hybrids may be considered, including simulation games that are used as case studies.[2]

Comparisons of the merits of simulation games versus other teaching techniques have been carried out by many researchers and a number of comprehensive reviews have been published.[3]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Subgenres 2
    • Construction and management simulation 2.1
    • Life simulation 2.2
    • Sports 2.3
    • Other types 2.4
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

History

While many credit simulation games beginning with Will Wright and SimCity in 1989, the true progenitor of the genre was "Fortune Builder", released in 1984 on Colecovision.[4] Certain games such as SimLife and SimEarth were subsequently created and are capable of teaching players the basics of genetics and global ecosystems.

In a study where adolescents played SimCity 2000, the study found that those participants who played the game had a greater appreciation and expectation of their government officials after playing.[5]

Subgenres

A screenshot from Lincity-NG, a city simulation game.

Construction and management simulation

Construction and management simulation (CMS)[6] is a type of simulation game in which players build, expand or manage fictional communities or projects with limited resources.[7] Strategy games sometimes incorporate CMS aspects into their game economy, as players must manage resources while expanding their project. But pure CMS games differ from strategy games in that "the player's goal is not to defeat an enemy, but to build something within the context of an ongoing process."[6] Games in this category are sometimes also called "management games".[8][9][10]

Life simulation

Life simulation games (or artificial life games)[11] is a subgenre of simulation video games in which the player lives or controls one or more artificial lifeforms. A life simulation game can revolve around "individuals and relationships, or it could be a simulation of an ecosystem".[11]

Sports

A sports game is a video game that simulates the playing of Championship Manager). Some, such as Arch Rivals, satirize the sport for comic effect. This genre has been popular throughout the history of video games and is competitive, just like real-world sports. A number of game series feature the names and characteristics of real teams and players, and are updated annually to reflect real-world changes.

Other types

FlightGear, a flight simulator video game.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Simulations: A Handbook for Teachers and Trainers", by Ken Jones, 1995, ISBN 0-7494-1666-1, p. 21
  2. ^ Danny Saunders, Jacqui Severn, "Simulation and Games for Strategy and Policy Planning", p. 20
  3. ^ "Games and Simulations to Enhance Quality Learning", 1996, ISBN 0-7494-1866-4, p. 50
  4. ^ http://www.colecovisionzone.com/page/game/coleco/fortune_builder.html
  5. ^
  6. ^ a b
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^ a b
  12. ^

Further reading

  • ALDRICH, Clark (2009): The Complete Guide to Simulations & Serious Games, John Wiley & Sons
  • BANKS, Jerry (ed.) (1998): Handbook of Simulation, John Wiley & Sons
  • BAUDRILLARD, Jean (1995): Simulacra and Simulation, University of Michigan Press; 17th Printing edition (February 15, 1995)
  • BOX, George E. P.; DRAPER, Norman R. (1987). Empirical Model-Building and Response Surfaces, p. 424, Wiley. ISBN 0-471-81033-9.
  • FERNÁNDEZ-IZQUIERDO, María Ángeles, MUÑOZ-TORRES, María Jesús, LEÓN, Raúl (Eds.)(2013): Modeling and Simulation in Engineering, Economics and Management, in: Proceedings of the International Conference, MS 2013, Castellón de la Plana, Spain, June 6–7, 2013, Springer Heidelberg Dordrecht London NewYork.
  • HÖHL, Wolfgang (2009): Interactive Environments with Open-Source Software, 3D-Walk-Throughs and Augmented Reality for Architects using Blender, DART and ARToolKit, SpringerWienNewYork
  • MORALES, Peter and ANDERSON, Dennis (2013): Process Simulation and Parametric Modeling for Strategic Project Management, Springer New York
  • ZEIGLER, Bernhard P. (2000): Theory of Modeling and Simulation, Elsevier Academic Press

External links

  • - An Interdisciplinary Journal of Theory, Practice and Research, SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320Simulation & Gaming
  • - Scientific Vizualisation, Simulation and CG Animation for Universities, Architects and Engineersscienceviz.com
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.