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Speed garage

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Title: Speed garage  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: UK garage, Bassline (music genre), Armand Van Helden, Rave music, 2-step garage
Collection: English Styles of Music, Uk Garage
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Speed garage

Speed garage (occasionally known as Plus-8[1]) is a genre of electronic music, associated with the UK garage scene.[2]

Characteristics

Speed garage features sped-up NY garage 4-to-the-floor rhythms that are combined with breakbeats.[3] Snares are placed as over the 2nd and the 4th kickdrums, so in other places of the drum pattern.[4] Speed garage tunes have warped, heavy basslines, influenced by jungle[5] and reggae.[6] Sweeping bass is typical for speed garage.[7] It is also typical for speed garage tunes to have a breakdown.[8] Speed garage tunes sometimes featured timestretched vocals.[9] As being heavily influenced by jungle, speed garage is full of jungle and dub sound effects, such as gunshots and sirens.[10][11]

A widely regarded pioneer of the speed garage sound is record producer, DJ and remixer Armand Van Helden, whose Dark Garage remix of the Sneaker Pimps' "Spin Spin Sugar" in 1996 is viewed by many to have brought the style of speed garage into the mainstream arena.

References

  1. ^ DJ magazine, 1996-1997, "Raggage": "...earning the scene the slightly mocked nick-names of 'plus-8' or 'speed garage'."
  2. ^ History of Speed garage: "There are many different forms of garage music, most of these were of little interest to UK hard dance fans until the latest mutation came along, speed garage."
  3. ^ History of Speed garage: "Speed garage can be broadly defined as a mixture of slightly sped up garage beats..."
  4. ^ 2Step: "In the original 1997 speed garage, the snares are fussy and clattering over the stomping 4-to-the-floor kickdrum."
  5. ^ History of Speed garage: "Speed garage can be broadly defined as a mixture of slightly sped up garage beats with a heavy almost junglistic bassline"
  6. ^ (2004) "Popular Music Genres: An Introduction", ISBN 0-7486-1745-0, ISBN 978-0-7486-1745-6, p.216: "Speed garage basslines were drawn from Jamaican reggae..."
  7. ^ (2004) "The Dance Music Manual", ISBN 0-240-51915-9, ISBN 978-0-240-51915-9, p.157: "The sweeping bass is typical of UK garage and speed garage tracks and consists of a tight yet deep bass that sweeps in pitch and/or frequencies"
  8. ^ History of Speed garage: "Speed garage can be broadly defined as a mixture of slightly sped up garage beats [...], and usually with a break in the middle where the beat is stripped down and then builds up for a long period of time."
  9. ^ History of Speed garage: "Speed garage can be broadly defined as a mixture of slightly sped up garage beats [...], sometimes with timestretched vocals"
  10. ^ (2004) "Popular Music Genres: An Introduction", ISBN 0-7486-1745-0, ISBN 978-0-7486-1745-6, p.216: "Jungle and ragga-style sound effects, such as the rash of gun shot volleys heard on popular speed garage tracks,..."
  11. ^ (2004) "Popular Music Genres: An Introduction", ISBN 0-7486-1745-0, ISBN 978-0-7486-1745-6, p.216: "Overall, two-step [..], less relied on the dub sound effects [...] of speed garage"

External links

  • Discogs listing for Spin Spin Sugar
  • Speed Garage fans community
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