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Stu Barnes

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Title: Stu Barnes  
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Subject: 1996–97 Pittsburgh Penguins season, 2000–01 Pittsburgh Penguins season, Buffalo Sabres, 2006–07 Dallas Stars season, 2006 Stanley Cup playoffs
Collection: 1970 Births, Buffalo Sabres Captains, Buffalo Sabres Players, Canadian Ice Hockey Centres, Dallas Stars Coaches, Dallas Stars Personnel, Dallas Stars Players, Florida Panthers Players, Ice Hockey People from Alberta, Living People, National Hockey League First Round Draft Picks, New Westminster Bruins Players, People from Spruce Grove, Pittsburgh Penguins Players, St. Albert Saints Players, Tri-City Americans Players, Winnipeg Jets (1979–96) Draft Picks, Winnipeg Jets (1979–96) Players
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Stu Barnes

Stu Barnes
Born (1970-12-25) December 25, 1970
Spruce Grove, AB, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 174 lb (79 kg; 12 st 6 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Right
Played for NHL
Winnipeg Jets
Florida Panthers
Pittsburgh Penguins
Buffalo Sabres
Dallas Stars
AHL
Moncton Hawks
Moncton Alpines
National team  Canada
NHL Draft 4th overall, 1989
Winnipeg Jets
Playing career 1991–2008

Stuart D. Barnes (born December 25, 1970) is a hockey operations consultant with the Dallas Stars of the National Hockey League (NHL).[1] He played 16 seasons at Centre (ice hockey) in the NHL with the Winnipeg Jets, Florida Panthers, Pittsburgh Penguins, Buffalo Sabres, and Dallas Stars. He currently has an arena named after him in the City of Spruce Grove where Barnes was born[2]

Contents

  • Playing career 1
  • Awards and achievements 2
  • Career statistics 3
  • Transactions 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Playing career

Barnes was drafted fourth overall by the Winnipeg Jets in the 1989 NHL Entry Draft. On November 25, 1993, the Jets traded him along with a sixth round selection (previously acquired from the St. Louis Blues; Chris Kibermanis) in 1994 to the Florida Panthers for Randy Gilhen. In Florida, he went to the Stanley Cup Finals, only to lose to the Colorado Avalanche. Then on November 19, 1996, the Pittsburgh Penguins traded Chris Wells to the Panthers for Barnes and Jason Woolley. The trade to the Penguins has been considered the worst in Panthers history. In 1999, Barnes was traded to the Buffalo Sabres for Matthew Barnaby. In Buffalo, he went to the Finals again, this time against Dallas, only to lose on a triple-overtime goal by Brett Hull. He served as the captain for the Sabres before being traded to the Stars in 2003 for Michael Ryan and a second round draft pick in the 2003 NHL Entry Draft. When Mike Modano was injured during the 2006–07 season, Barnes served as an alternate captain of the Stars. He also served as an alternate captain for most of the 2007–08 season due to Sergei Zubov's absence from the line-up. Barnes announced his retirement as a player on August 28, 2008 and joined the Stars as an assistant coach for three seasons before becoming a hockey operations consultant.[2][3]

Awards and achievements

Career statistics

    Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1987–88 New Westminster Bruins WHL 71 37 64 101 88 5 2 3 5 6
1988–89 Tri-City Americans WHL 70 59 82 141 117 7 6 5 11 10
1989–90 Tri-City Americans WHL 63 52 92 144 165 7 1 5 6 26
1990–91 Canadian National Team Intl 52 22 27 49 68
1991–92 Moncton Alpines AHL 30 13 20 33 10 11 3 9 12 6
1991–92 Winnipeg Jets NHL 46 8 9 17 26
1992–93 Moncton Hawks AHL 42 23 31 54 58
1992–93 Winnipeg Jets NHL 38 12 10 22 10 6 1 3 4 2
1993–94 Winnipeg Jets NHL 18 5 4 9 8
1993–94 Florida Panthers NHL 59 18 20 38 30
1994–95 Florida Panthers NHL 41 10 19 29 8
1995–96 Florida Panthers NHL 72 19 25 44 46 22 6 10 16 4
1996–97 Florida Panthers NHL 19 2 8 10 10
1996–97 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 62 17 22 39 16 5 0 1 1 0
1997–98 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 78 30 35 65 30 6 3 3 6 2
1998–99 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 64 20 12 32 20
1998–99 Buffalo Sabres NHL 17 0 4 4 10 21 7 3 10 6
1999–00 Buffalo Sabres NHL 82 20 25 45 16 5 3 0 3 2
2000–01 Buffalo Sabres NHL 75 19 24 43 26 13 4 4 8 2
2001–02 Buffalo Sabres NHL 68 17 31 48 26
2002–03 Buffalo Sabres NHL 68 11 21 32 20
2002–03 Dallas Stars NHL 13 2 5 7 8 12 2 3 5 0
2003–04 Dallas Stars NHL 77 11 18 29 18 5 0 0 0 0
2005–06 Dallas Stars NHL 78 15 21 36 44 5 1 1 2 0
2006–07 Dallas Stars NHL 82 13 12 25 40 7 1 3 4 4
2007–08 Dallas Stars NHL 79 12 11 23 26 9 2 1 3 2
NHL Totals (16 Seasons) 1136 261 336 597 438 116 30 32 62 24
WHL Totals (3 Seasons) 204 148 238 386 370 19 9 13 22 42
AHL Totals (2 Seasons) 72 36 51 87 68 11 3 9 12 6

Transactions

  • On July 19, 1994 the Florida Panthers re-signed Stu Barnes to a multi-year contract.
  • On July 16, 1996 the Florida Panthers signed Stu Barnes to a multi-year contract.
  • On June 20, 1998 the Pittsburgh Penguins re-signed Stu Barnes.
  • On September 23, 1999 the Buffalo Sabres re-signed restricted free agent Stu Barnes to a multi-year contract.
  • On August 3, 2004 the Dallas Stars re-signed Stu Barnes to a 2-year contract extension.
  • On June 7, 2007 the Dallas Stars re-signed Stu Barnes to a 1-year contract.
  • On August 28, 2008 Stu Barnes announced his retirement and was hired as assistant coach of the Dallas Stars for a 2-year contract.
  • On July 13, 2010 Stu Barnes was re-signed as assistant coach of the Dallas Stars for a 2-year contract.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://stars.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=39227
  2. ^ a b "Barnes Joins Coaching Staff" (Press release).  
  3. ^ http://stars.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=39227

External links

  • Stu Barnes's career statistics at EliteProspects.com
  • Stu Barnes's career statistics at The Internet Hockey Database
Preceded by
Teemu Selänne
Winnipeg Jets first round draft pick
1989
Succeeded by
Keith Tkachuk
Preceded by
Michael Peca
Buffalo Sabres captain
200103
Succeeded by
Miroslav Satan
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