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Stuart Immonen

Stuart Immonen
Immonen in June 2011
Nationality Canadian
Area(s) Writer, Penciller, Inker, Colourist
Notable works
Action Comics
The Adventures of Superman
Nextwave
Ultimate X-Men
Ultimate Spider-Man
Fear Itself
Spouse(s) Kathryn Immonen
http://www.immonen.ca

Stuart Immonen is a Canadian comic book artist. He is best known for his work on Nextwave, Ultimate X-Men, The New Avengers, and Ultimate Spider-Man. His pencils are usually inked by Wade Von Grawbadger.[1]

Contents

  • Career 1
  • Reception 2
  • Bibliography 3
    • DC 3.1
    • Marvel 3.2
    • Other publishers 3.3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Career

In 1988, he self-published a series titled Playground; it was his first published work. He worked at several smaller comic book companies before being hired by DC Comics in 1993.[2] Since then, Immonen has drawn such high-profile characters as Superman, the Hulk, and the X-Men. His work since 2004 includes stints on the titles Ultimate Fantastic Four and Ultimate X-Men with writers Warren Ellis and Brian K. Vaughan, as well as a 12-issue run pencilling Nextwave, which again paired him with Warren Ellis.[3]

Stuart Immonen has also done work for Top Cow and Image Comics.[2]

In 1993 and 1994, Immonen drew the Legion of Super-Heroes and with writers Mark Waid and Tom McGraw created a new Legion continuity, beginning with a retelling of the team's origin story starting in Legion of Super-Heroes vol. 4 #0 (Oct. 1994).[4] In 1996, writer Karl Kesel and Immonen produced The Final Night limited series.[5] That same year, Immonen was one of the many creators who contributed to the Superman: The Wedding Album one-shot wherein the title character married Lois Lane.[6] Immonen wrote and drew part of the Superman Red/Superman Blue one-shot which launched the storyline of the same name which ran through the various Superman titles.[7] Immonen ended his ongoing involvement with the Superman franchise with the Superman: End of the Century graphic novel in 2000[8] but returned to the character for the Superman: Secret Identity in 2004.[3]

In 2000, Immonen was one of the founders of Gorilla Comics, a company formed with Mark Waid, Kurt Busiek and several others. Immonen and Busiek collaborated on the Shockrockets limited series and the Superstar: As Seen on TV one-shot but the company folded after a short time.[9]

In 2005, Immonen published 50 Reasons to Stop Sketching at Conventions, a series of fifty comics that detail why he no longer does sketches for fans. Besides self-publishing, Immonen also maintains a webcomic called Never as Bad as You Think which is co-authored by his wife, Kathryn.[10] Moving Pictures - a webcomic co-authored by the Immonens - was published as a graphic novel by Top Shelf Productions in 2010.

Immonen illustrated Marvel Comics' Ultimate Spider-Man from issue #111.[11] to issue #133.[12] He subsequently worked on The New Avengers, from issue #55 to issue #64. He continued to be the series artist when The New Avengers relaunched during the "Heroic Age" storyline, and was the regular artist for the first seven issues, and later drew issue #11 as well.[13]

In 2011 Immonen illustrated Marvel's Fear Itself miniseries, which formed the core of a company-wide crossover storyline of the same name.[14][15][16]

In November 2012 he and writer Brian Michael Bendis started the series All-New X-Men.[17]

Reception

In 2010, Immonen won the Joe Shuster Award for Outstanding Artist.[18]

Doug Zawisza, reviewing the 2011

Preceded by
Jason Pearson
Legion of Super-Heroes vol. 4 artist
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Lee Moder
Preceded by
Barry Kitson
The Adventures of Superman artist
1995–1997
Succeeded by
Tom Grummett
Preceded by
Tom Grummett
Action Comics artist
1997–1999
Succeeded by
Ron Frenz
Preceded by
Randall Frenz
The Adventures of Superman writer
(with Mark Millar)

1999–2000
Succeeded by
J. M. DeMatteis
Preceded by
Mark Bagley
Ultimate Spider-Man artist
2007–2009
Succeeded by
David Lafuente
  • Official website
  • Stuart Immonen at the Comic Book DB
  • Stuart Immonen at Marvel.com
  • Stuart Immonen at Mike's Amazing World of Comics
  • Stuart Immonen at the Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators

External links

  1. ^ Marston, George (May 4, 2011). #1, More"Moon Knight #2, Fear Itself"Best Shots Extra: .  
  2. ^ a b "Stuart Immonen".  
  3. ^ a b Stuart Immonen at the Grand Comics Database
  4. ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1990s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle.  
  5. ^ Manning "1990s" in Dolan, p. 274: "In this four-issue miniseries by writer Karl Kesel and artist Stuart Immonnen, the heroes of the present united with the Legion of Super-Heroes and the New Gods in an attempt to stop a 'sun-eater'."
  6. ^ Manning "1990s" in Dolan, p. 275: " The behind-the-scenes talent on the monumental issue appropriately spanned several generations of the Man of Tomorrow's career. Written by Dan Jurgens, Karl Kesel, David Michelinie, Louise Simonson, and Roger Stern, the one-shot featured the pencils of John Byrne, Gil Kane, Stuart Immonen, Paul Ryan, Jon Bogdanove, Kieron Dwyer, Tom Grummett, Dick Giordano, Jim Mooney, Curt Swan, Nick Cardy, Al Plastino, Barry Kitson, Ron Frenz, and Dan Jurgens."
  7. ^ Manning "1990s" in Dolan, p. 283: "The special written by Dan Jurgens, Stuart Immonen, Karl Kesel, and Louise Simonson, with pencils by Stuart Immonen, Ron Frenz, Tom Grummett, Paul Ryan, and Jon Bogdanove."
  8. ^ Immonen, Stuart (2000). Superman: End of the Century. DC Comics. p. 96.  
  9. ^ Dean, Michael (June 8, 2001). "The Case of the Disappearing Gorilla: The Banana Trust Explains How Not to Start a Comics Line".  
  10. ^ Draper Carlson, Johanna (August 31, 2006). "50 Reasons to Stop Sketching at Conventions". Comics Worth Reading. Archived from the original on August 8, 2013. 
  11. ^ Begins A New Era"Ultimate Spider-Man".  
  12. ^ George, Richard; Schedeen, Jesse (February 8, 2009). "A New Beginning for Ultimate Spider-Man".  
  13. ^  
  14. ^ Manning, Shaun (December 21, 2010). "Fear Itself"Marvel Announces . Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. 
  15. ^ Truitt, Brian (December 21, 2010). "Fear Itself"Be afraid: Marvel's heroes gear up for .  
  16. ^ Cowsill, Alan; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "2000s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging.  
  17. ^ Arrant, Chris (November 8, 2013). "Inside Stuart Immonen’s All-New ALL-NEW X-MEN Costumes". Newsarama.
  18. ^ Boyd, Kevin A. (June 22, 2010). "2010 Outstanding Artist – Stuart Immonen".  
  19. ^ Zawisza, Doug (April 4, 2011). #1"Fear Itself". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on November 2, 2013. 
  20. ^ Zawisza, Doug (May 4, 2011). #2"Fear Itself". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 15, 2012. 
  21. ^ Zawisza, Doug (June 1, 2011). #3"Fear Itself". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 15, 2012. 
  22. ^ Zawisza, Doug (July 6, 2011). #4"Fear Itself". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on November 9, 2013. 
  23. ^ Smith, Jennifer Margret (April 7, 2011). , More"Brightest Day, Fear Itself"Best Shots Rapid Reviews: . Newsarama. Archived from the original on December 22, 2013. 
  24. ^ Young, Thom (April 10, 2011). #1"Fear Itself"Sunday Slugfest: .  
  25. ^ Djeljosevic, Danny (May 6, 2011). #2"Fear Itself". Comics Bulletin. Archived from the original on December 22, 2013. 
  26. ^ Hill, Shawn; Salama Cohén, Sam (June 5, 2011). #3"Fear Itself"Sunday Slugfest: . Comics Bulletin. Archived from the original on August 17, 2011. 
  27. ^ Djeljosevic, Danny (July 8, 2011). #4"Fear Itself". Comics Bulletin. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. 
  28. ^ Evans, Alex (April 6, 2011). #1 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. 
  29. ^ Evans, Alex (May 4, 2011). #2 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. 
  30. ^ Evans, Alex (June 2, 2013). #3 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 26, 2013. 
  31. ^ Evans, Alex (July 6, 2011). #4 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 26, 2013. 
  32. ^ Evans, Alex (August 12, 2011). #5 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. 
  33. ^ Evans, Alex (September 14, 2011). #6 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 20, 2013. 
  34. ^ Stell, Dean (October 19, 2011). #7 – Review"Fear Itself". Weekly Comic Book Review. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. 

References

Other publishers

Marvel

DC

Bibliography

[34][33][32][31][30][29][28] thought the art and colors were vibrant and detailed, and Immonen the perfect choice for the series, though Stell thought it looked a bit rushed in issue #6, and not up to Immonen's usual standards in issue #7.Weekly Comic Book Review Alex Evans and Dean Stell of [27] with Danny Djeljosevic echoing Zawisza's comments regarding Immonen's ability to effectively render different subjects, such as sleepy seaside Canadian towns from superhero battles, saying, "Immonen is easily the most versatile artist in comics, who will surely go down as one of the greats with his striking layouts and dynamic, varied panel to panel storytelling. Immonen reminds me of the old-school Marvel Comics artists, who were capable of delivering strong, consistent work every month with little need for fill-ins."[26][25][24],Comics Bulletin Similar reactions was garnered among reviewers at [23], while praising the entire creative team, commented, "but it's Immonen who really shines", in reference to Immonen's storytelling and skill at crowd scenes.Newsarama Jennifer Margret Smith, reviewing the first issue for [22], which he called "chilling".British Columbia in issue #1, as well as numerous scenes in issue #4, such as the scenes of global chaos, the Odin-Serpent framing sequence and the shots of Yggdrasil's depiction of Laura Martin he praised specific visuals, including Immonen and [21] Though Zawisza was not reluctant to note the occasional error,[20]

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