World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Suture (joint)

Article Id: WHEBN0004286422
Reproduction Date:

Title: Suture (joint)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Calvaria (skull), Craniofacial surgery, Symphysis, Index of civil engineering articles, Anatomical terms of motion
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Suture (joint)

Suture (joint)
Side view of the skull.
Human skull side suturas right
Details
Latin Sutura
Identifiers
Gray's p.284
Dorlands
/Elsevier
s_30/12773924
Anatomical terminology

A suture is a type of fibrous joint which only occurs in the skull (or "cranium"). They are bound together by Sharpey's fibres. A tiny amount of movement is permitted at sutures, which contributes to the compliance and elasticity of the skull.

These joints are synarthroses.[1] It is normal for many of the bones of the skull to remain unfused at birth. The fusion of the skull's bones at birth is known as craniosynostosis. The term "fontanelle" is used to describe the resulting "soft spots". The relative positions of the bones continue to change during the life of the adult (though less rapidly), which can provide useful information in forensics and archaeology. In old age, cranial sutures may ossify (turn to bone) completely.

The joints between the teeth and the joint between the mandible and the cranium, the temporomandibular joint, form the only non-sutured joints in the skull.

List of sutures

Most sutures are named for the bones they articulate, but some have special names of their own.

Primarily visible from the side (norma lateralis)

Primarily visible from front (norma frontalis) or above (norma verticalis)

Primarily visible from below (norma basalis) or inside

Gallery

References

  1. ^ "Module - Introduction to Joints". Archived from the original on 2007-12-17. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 

External links

  • MedlinePlus Encyclopedia 002320
  • Age at Death Estimation from Cranial Suture Closures
  • http://commons.bcit.ca/biology/articulations/fibrous.html


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.