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This Week (ITV TV series)

This Week was a weekly current affairs series first produced for ITV in January 1956 by Associated-Rediffusion (later Thames Television), running until 1978, when it was replaced by TV Eye for eight years.[1] In 1986, the earlier name was revived and This Week continued until Thames lost its franchise at the end of 1992.

In September 1958, This Week, filmed George Harrison Marks and Pamela Green at their photography studio in Gerrard Street. David Kentick directed and Nick Barker interviewed Marks and Green. They were filmed working with a nude model, who was strategically covered by a very long wig. The film sequence ended with a montage of their photographs, mostly of nudes. However, the night it was to be broadcast Pope Pius XII died and the programme was cut, and the interview never shown. In 1964, This Week returned to their studio. This time round they showed a clip of the infamous striptease comedy film The Window Dresser.

However, its most influential episode was an expose on the Martin Webster two weeks later as a result of the revelations on the show from former NF Chairman John O'Brien of their neo-Nazi paramilitary pasts and continued links.

The most controversial edition was "Death on the Rock", a 1988 documentary which questioned the official account of the Gibraltar shootings. It is commonly believed this programme was responsible for Thames losing their broadcast franchise.

During its run, the series' presenters included Yvonne Roberts and John Edwards. The programme used the Intermezzo from Sibelius's Karelia Suite as a signature tune.

See also

References

  1. ^ Bernard, Marcus. "ITV London - Thames Television (TV ARK ON LINE MUSEUM)".  

External links

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