World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Toilet seat cover

Article Id: WHEBN0024941996
Reproduction Date:

Title: Toilet seat cover  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Accessible toilet, Board toilet, Female urination device, Sanitation, Hygiene
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Toilet seat cover

A box of toilet seat covers
A toilet-seat cover or toilet sheet is a disposable piece of paper shaped like the germs that may be resting on the seat by creating a protective barrier.

Use

Toilet seat covers are generally held in a dispenser, allowing the users to access one cover at a time, without making unnecessary contact with additional toilet seat covers.

A toilet seat cover dispenser with instructions on a bus in North America.

While toilet-seat covers give public toilet users a sense of security, studies have shown they do not necessarily protect a toilet user from disease. For example, if a toilet user is negligent enough to place a toilet-seat cover while the seat is still wet with liquid waste the fluids can soak through the cover and make contact with the user.[1]

Most toilet seat covers also have two sides, a shiny side that is impregnated with wax and a mild germicide and a dull side. If used properly, the shiny side should face the seat.[2]

Proper Usage

There has been much debate amongst those who use toilet covers regarding the orientation of said toilet seat cover. The proper way to place a cover on a toilet seat is to place the side with the flap toward the front of the toilet seat and dropping the flap into the toilet water.

Future Developments

In 2007, businesswoman Jacquie Edwards of Newtonmore developed a biodegradeable toilet seat cover.[3]

Laws

In 2009, legislators in Maine rejected legislation that would have required toilet-seat covers be placed in all restrooms. The bill was referred to the Committee on Health and Human Services, but eventually filed without further action being taken to enact the law.[4]

References

  1. ^ Roach, Mary (2000-05-19). "Ladies who spray". Salon.com. Retrieved 2012-08-20. 
  2. ^ Lee, Robert (2010). Standing on the Edge of Your Tomorrow Take Charge and Win!. Xlibris Corporation. p. 188.  
  3. ^ "UK | Scotland | Highlands and Islands | Wins for loo seat cover developer". BBC News. 2007-06-28. Retrieved 2012-08-20. 
  4. ^ "Summary". Mainelegislature.org. Retrieved 2012-08-20. 

External links

  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.