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Triptorelin

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Triptorelin

Triptorelin
Systematic (IUPAC) name
5-oxo-D-prolyl-L-histidyl-Ltryptophyl-L-seryl-Ltyrosyl-3-(1H-indol-2-yl)-L-alanylleucyl-L-arginyl-L-prolylglycinamide
Clinical data
Trade names Trelstar
AHFS/Drugs.com
MedlinePlus
Pregnancy
category
  • D
Legal status
  • (Prescription only)
Routes of
administration
Implant
Pharmacokinetic data
Excretion Renal
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  N
ATC code L02
IUPHAR/BPS
ChemSpider  YesY
UNII  YesY
ChEBI  YesY
ChEMBL  N
Chemical data
Formula C64H82N18O13
Molecular mass
Documentation

 N   

Triptorelin, a decapeptide (pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-D-Trp-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2), is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH agonist) used as the acetate or pamoate salts. By causing constant stimulation of the pituitary, it decreases pituitary secretion of gonadotropins luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Like other GnRH agonists, triptorelin may be used in the treatment of hormone-responsive cancers such as prostate cancer or breast cancer, precocious puberty, estrogen-dependent conditions (such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids), and in assisted reproduction. It is also used as therapy in cases of gender dysphoria. Triptorelin is marketed under the brand names Decapeptyl (Ipsen) and Diphereline and Gonapeptyl (Ferring Pharmaceuticals). In the United States, it is sold by Watson Pharmaceuticals as Trelstar. In Iran Triptorelin is marketed under the brand name Variopeptyl (Varian Darou Pajooh).

During the treatment of prostate cancer it does cause a surge of testosterone (an initial uplevel of testosterone levels), known as a flare effect. In men a reduction of serum testosterone levels into the range normally seen after surgical castration occurs approximately two to four weeks after initiation of therapy. In contrast, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists do not cause a surge, but a sudden reduction of testosterone levels.
Systematic IUPAC Name: [d-Trp6]GnRH

References



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