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Trotwood, Ohio

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Trotwood, Ohio

Trotwood, Ohio
City
Trotwood Railroad Station
Location of Trotwood, Ohio
Location of Trotwood, Ohio
Location within Montgomery County, Ohio
Location within Montgomery County, Ohio
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Ohio
County Montgomery
Government
 • City manager Michael J. Lucking
Area[1]
 • Total 30.50 sq mi (78.99 km2)
 • Land 30.49 sq mi (78.97 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation[2] 840 ft (256 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 24,431
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 24,326
 • Density 801.3/sq mi (309.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 937
FIPS code 39-77504[5]
GNIS feature ID 1061709[2]
Website http://www.trotwood.org/

Trotwood is a city in Montgomery County, Ohio, United States. The population was 24,431 at the 2010 census.[6] It is part of the Dayton Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is served by the Trotwood-Madison City School District. It is named for Betsy Trotwood, the Charles Dickens character.

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • Demographics 2
    • 2010 census 2.1
    • 2000 census 2.2
  • Tourism and attractions 3
  • In popular culture 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Geography

Trotwood is located at (39.794807, -84.289892).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 30.50 square miles (78.99 km2), of which 30.49 square miles (78.97 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

The Village of Trotwood was incorporated in 1901 from portions of Madison Township (the township itself was established in 1809); in 1996 the village and township merged into a single political entity.[8] This merger resulted in the creation of a Trotwood neighborhood (Townview) that is completely surrounded by the City of Dayton. Several smaller sections are attached to Trotwood by only a roadway or a small strip of land. The merger also added a large rural area to this suburban community consisting of farms, golf courses, and large rural estates.

Wolf Creek, a tributary of the Miami River, runs through Trotwood providing fishing and many scenic areas. Also along Wolf Creek is the only state park in Montgomery County. The 3,000-acre (12 km2) Sycamore Woods State Park offers horseback riding, hiking, hunting, and Group camping.

The city is adjacent to the cities of Dayton, Clayton (since Clayton merged with its surrounding Randolph Township in 1998[9][10]) and Englewood.

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 24,431 people, 10,404 households, and 6,408 families residing in the city. The population density was 801.3 inhabitants per square mile (309.4/km2). There were 12,152 housing units at an average density of 398.6 per square mile (153.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 28.1% White, 68.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population.

There were 10,404 households of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.5% were married couples living together, 24.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.4% were non-families. 33.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the city was 41.8 years. 23.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.8% were from 25 to 44; 28.6% were from 45 to 64; and 17.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 44.4% male and 55.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 27,420 people, 11,110 households, and 7,343 families residing in the city. The population density was 898.1 people per square mile (346.8/km²). There were 12,020 housing units at an average density of 393.7 per square mile (152.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 38.66% White, 58.34% African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.98% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.82% of the population.

There were 11,110 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.3% were married couples living together, 21.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 83.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 76.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,931, and the median income for a family was $40,426. Males had a median income of $33,771 versus $26,324 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,329. About 13.6% of families and 15.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.0% of those under age 18 and 11.3% of those age 65 or over.

Tourism and attractions

Trotwood is the home of Hara Arena, where the annual Dayton Hamvention is held.[16] Every year, thousands of Amateur Radio Operators from around the world attend this convention. The Hara Arena is home to the Dayton Demolition team in the Federal Hockey League, as well as the Dayton Sharks indoor football team of the Continental Indoor Football League.

Trotwood is also home to United Theological Seminary, one of thirteen seminaries of the United Methodist Church.

Trotwood has two golf courses: Moss Creek, and Hara Greens. Larch Tree Golf Course was sold in 2012 and is no longer a golf course.

In popular culture

Roscoe Filburn, defendant in the 1942 Supreme Court case of Wickard v. Filburn, which permitted the Federal Government to regulate intrastate commerce under the Interstate Commerce Clause, farmed near 5150 Denlinger Road in what is now urban Trotwood.[17]

Trotwood is the alleged childhood home of John Dorian on the television show 'Scrubs'."

Trotwood is the confirmed childhood home of legendary detective Thomas J. Cope.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  4. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder".  
  6. ^ "American FactFinder2". Retrieved 2010-03-20. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  8. ^ http://www.trotwood.org/pdf/city_history.pdf
  9. ^ http://www.mergerstudy.com/Clayton-RandolphMergerReport.pdf
  10. ^ http://www.rths.org/
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  16. ^ 2008 Dayton Hamvention - The Greatest Amateur Radio Convention in the World!
  17. ^ http://www.thefilburnfoundation.com/filburnsfarm.html

External links

  • City website
  • Dayton Metro Library, Trotwood Branch
  • Totally Trotwood - Weekly News
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