USS Cummings (DD-44)

USS Cummings (DD-44)
USS Cummings (DD-44) at anchor, circa 1916.
History
United States
Name: Cummings
Namesake: Lieutenant commander Andrew Boyd Cummings
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Cost: $776,910.48[1]
Laid down: 21 May 1912
Launched: 6 August 1913
Sponsored by: Mrs. H. Beates, Jr., niece of Lieutenant Commander Cummings
Commissioned: 19 September 1913
Decommissioned: 23 June 1922
Struck: 5 July 1934
Identification:
Fate: transferred to the United States Coast Guard, 7 June 1924
Status: sold for scrapping, 22 August 1934
Notes: Cummings lost her name to new construction 1 July 1933
USCG Cummings (CG-3) on Coast Guard service during the Prohibition Era.
USCG Cummings (CG-3) on Coast Guard service during the Prohibition Era.
United States
Name: Cummings
Acquired: 6 June 1924[2]
Commissioned: 15 May 1925[2]
Decommissioned: 30 April 1932[2]
Identification: Hull symbol:CG-3
Fate: transferred back to the United States Navy, 23 May 1932
General characteristics [3]
Class & type: Cassin-class destroyer
Displacement: 1,020 long tons (1,040 t)
Length: 305 ft 3 in (93.04 m)
Beam: 31 ft 2 in (9.50 m)
Draft: 9 ft 3 in (2.82 m) (mean)[4]
Installed power:
  • oil fired boilers
  • 16,000 ihp (12,000 kW)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 29.5 kn (33.9 mph; 54.6 km/h)
  • 30.57 kn (35.18 mph; 56.62 km/h) (Speed on Trial)[4]
Complement:
  • 5 officers 96 enlisted (USN)[5]
  • 6 officers, 82 enlisted (USCG)[6]
Armament:

The first USS Cummings (DD-44) was a Cassin-class destroyer used by the United States Navy during World War I. She was later transferred to the United States Coast Guard, where she was designated CG-3. She was named for Lieutenant Commander Andrew Boyd Cummings.

Cummings was launched on 6 August 1913 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine; sponsored by Mrs. H. Beates, Jr., niece of Lieutenant Commander Cummings; and commissioned on 19 September 1913, Lieutenant Commander A. Crenshaw in command.

Contents

  • Pre-World War I 1
  • World War I 2
  • Inter-war period 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Pre-World War I

Departing Boston in November 1913, Cummings cruised along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean until the following June, when she joined the Neutrality Patrol and cruised off the coast until the United States entered into World War I.

World War I

Arriving at Woodrow Wilson to Brest, France.

Inter-war period

Cummings departed French waters on 16 December 1918, and from 6–9 April 1919 she joined in destroyer maneuvers and gunnery exercises at Guantanamo Bay. In July and August, she operated off Newport, and then was in reserve at Philadelphia from August 1919-March 1921. She returned to operations off the east coast with the Fleet until placed out of commission in Philadelphia on 23 June 1922.

Transferred to the Treasury Department for the Coast Guard on 6 June 1924, Cummings served as part of the Rum Patrol.[6] She was based in New London, Connecticut until transferred to Stapleton, New York in 1931.

Cummings was returned to the Navy on 23 May 1932 and sold on 22 August 1934 for scrapping in accordance with the London Naval Treaty.

References

  1. ^ "Table 21 - Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919". Congressional Serial Set (U.S. Government Printing Office): 762. 1921. 
  2. ^ a b c Record of Movements Vessels of the United States Coast Guard 1790 -December 31, 1933 (PDF). Washington: TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 1989. p. 445. 
  3. ^ "USS Cummings (DD-44)". Navsource.org. Retrieved June 26, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "Table 10 - Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919". Congressional Serial Set (U.S. Government Printing Office): 714. 1921. 
  5. ^ "Table 16 - Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919". Congressional Serial Set (U.S. Government Printing Office): 749. 1921. 
  6. ^ a b c "Cummings (CG-3)" (PDF). U.S. Coast Guard Webcuttes. U. S. Coast Guard Historian's Office. Retrieved 26 June 2015. 

External links

  • Photo gallery of USS Cummings at NavSource Naval History
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.