United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime

United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime
Type international criminal law
Drafted 15 November 2000
Signed 12 December 2000
Location New York City, United States
Effective 29 September 2003
Condition 40 ratifications
Signatories 147
Parties 185
Depositary Secretary-General of the United Nations
Languages Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish

The United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC) is a 2000 United Nations-sponsored resolution of the United Nations General Assembly on 15 November 2000. It is also called the Palermo Convention, and its three protocols (the Palermo Protocols) are:[1]

All four of these instruments contain elements of the current international law on human trafficking, arms trafficking and money laundering. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) acts as custodian of the UNTOC and its protocols.

The Convention came into force on 29 September 2003. As of January 2015, it has 185 parties,[2] which includes 180 United Nations member states, the Cook Islands, the Holy See, Niue, the State of Palestine, and the European Union. The 13 UN member states that are not party to the Convention are (* indicates that the state has signed but not ratified the Convention):

See also

References

  1. ^ "UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION AGAINST TRANSNATIONAL ORGANIZED CRIME AND THE PROTOCOLS THERETO" (PDF). UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME. 2004. p. V. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 
  2. ^ UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime: Treaty status

External links

  • UNODC site.
  • Text of convention and protocols.
  • Signatures and ratifications.
  • Procedural history, related documents, photos and videos on the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crimes (with protocols) in the Historic Archives of the United Nations Audiovisual Library of International Law
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