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United States Senate election in Nevada, 2006

 

United States Senate election in Nevada, 2006

United States Senate election in Nevada, 2006

November 7, 2006

 
Nominee John Ensign Jack Carter
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 322,501 238,796
Percentage 55.4% 41.0%

County results

U.S. Senator before election

John Ensign
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John Ensign
Republican

The 2006 United States Senate election in Nevada was held on November 7, 2006. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator John Ensign won re-election to a second term.

Contents

  • Democratic primary 1
    • Candidates 1.1
    • Results 1.2
  • Republican primary 2
    • Candidates 2.1
    • Results 2.2
  • General election 3
    • Candidates 3.1
    • Campaign 3.2
    • Polling 3.3
    • Results 3.4
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary vote[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jack Carter 92,270 78.30%
Democratic None of these candidates 14,425 12.24%
Democratic Ruby Jee Tun 11,147 9.46%
Totals 117,842 100.00%

Republican primary

Candidates

  • John Ensign, incumbent U.S. Senator
  • Ed Hamilton, businessman

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ensign (inc.) 127,023 90.47%
Republican None of these candidates 6,754 4.81%
Republican Ed Hamilton 6,629 4.72%
Totals 140,406 100.00%

General election

Candidates

  • Jack Carter (D), Navy veteran and son of President Jimmy Carter
  • John Ensign (R), incumbent U.S. Senator
  • David Schumann (I), retired financial analyst, 2004 nominee, and 2002 state senator nominee
  • Brendan Trainor (L), state party chair, airline quality manager, and frequent candidate

Campaign

Popular Las Vegas mayor Oscar Goodman had said in January that he would probably run,[3] but in late April, he decisively ruled that out.[4] Goodman did not file by the May 12, 2006 deadline. Carter's advantages included his formidable speaking abilities and kinship with a former U.S. President. On the other hand, Ensign was also considered to be an effective speaker and as of the first quarter of 2006, held an approximately 5-1 advantage over Carter in cash-on-hand.

Polling

Source Date Ensign (R) Carter (D)
/Research 2000Reno Gazette-Journal October 29, 2006 55% 41%
Zogby/WSJ October 19, 2006 52% 43%
Rasmussen October 17, 2006 50% 42%
Zogby/WSJ September 28, 2006 49% 42%
/Mason-DixonLas Vegas Review-Journal September 26, 2006 58% 35%
Rasmussen September 22, 2006 50% 41%
/Research 2000Reno Gazette-Journal September 15, 2006 56% 35%
Zogby/WSJ September 11, 2006 52% 40%
Zogby/WSJ August 28, 2006 48% 45%
/Mason-DixonLas Vegas Review-Journal August 12, 2006 54% 33%
Rasmussen July 31, 2006 46% 39%
Zogby/WSJ July 24, 2006 50% 35%
Zogby/WSJ June 21, 2006 51% 36%
/News 4Reno Gazette-Journal May 12–15, 2006 52% 32%
/Mason-DixonLas Vegas Review-Journal April 3–5, 2006 60% 27%
Zogby/WSJ March 31, 2006 52% 38%

Results

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican John Ensign (inc.) 322,501 55.36% +0.27%
Democratic Jack Carter 238,796 40.99% +1.30%
None of These Candidates 8,232 1.41% -0.50%
Independent American David K. Schumann 7,774 1.33% +0.91%
Libertarian Brendan Trainor 5,269 0.90% +0.01%
Majority 83,705 14.37% -1.03%
Turnout 582,572
Republican hold Swing

Ensign won a majority of the votes in every county in the state, with his lowest percentage at 53%.

References

  1. ^ http://www.nvsos.gov/SOSelectionPages/results/2006StateWidePrimary/ElectionSummary.aspx
  2. ^ http://www.nvsos.gov/SOSelectionPages/results/2006StateWidePrimary/ElectionSummary.aspx
  3. ^ http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nevada/2006/jan/03/010310016.html
  4. ^ http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2006/Apr-20-Thu-2006/news/6951515.html
  5. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2006/2006Stat.htm#28

External links

  • Ensign campaign site
  • Carter campaign site(inactive)
  • Trainor campaign site
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