Vaginal portion

Vaginal portion of cervix
1. Round ligament
2. Uterus
3. Uterine cavity
4. Intestinal surface of Uterus
5. Versical surface(toward bladder)
6. Fundus of uterus
7. Body of uterus
8. Palmate folds of cervical canal
9. Cervical canal
10. Posterior lip
11. Cervical os (external)
12. Isthmus of uterus
13. Supravaginal portion of cervix
14. Vaginal portion of cervix
15. Anterior lip
16. Cervix
Posterior half of uterus and upper part of vagina. (Vaginal portion of cervix visible but not labeled.)
Latin portio vaginalis cervicis
Gray's subject #268 1260

The vaginal portion of the cervix projects free into the anterior wall of the vagina between the anterior and posterior fornices vaginae.

On its rounded extremity is a small, depressed, somewhat circular aperture, the external orifice of the uterus, through which the cavity of the cervix communicates with that of the vagina.

The external orifice is bounded by two lips, an anterior and a posterior, of which the anterior is the shorter and thicker, although, on account of the slope of the cervix, it projects lower than the posterior.

Normally, both lips are in contact with the posterior vaginal wall.

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.

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