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Vinton County, Ohio

 

Vinton County, Ohio

Vinton County, Ohio
Seal of Vinton County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Vinton County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 23, 1850[1]
Named for Samuel Finley Vinton
Seat McArthur
Largest village McArthur
Area
 • Total 415 sq mi (1,075 km2)
 • Land 412 sq mi (1,067 km2)
 • Water 2.6 sq mi (7 km2), 0.6%
Population
 • (2010) 13,435
 • Density 33/sq mi (13/km²)
Congressional district 15th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4

Vinton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,435,[2] making it the least populous county in the state. Its county seat is McArthur.[3] The county is named for Samuel Finley Vinton, a 19th-century United States Congressman from Ohio.[4]

Contents

  • Geography 1
    • Waterways 1.1
    • Adjacent counties 1.2
  • Demographics 2
  • Government and infrastructure 3
    • Emergency services 3.1
    • Post Offices 3.2
    • Utilities 3.3
      • Phone, Internet and cable 3.3.1
      • Gas and electricity 3.3.2
      • Water and garbage disposal 3.3.3
  • Education 4
  • Transportation 5
    • Highways 5.1
    • Airports 5.2
  • Media 6
  • Tourism 7
    • Covered bridges 7.1
    • State Parks and Recreation Areas 7.2
    • Lake Hope Bike Trails 7.3
    • Zaleski Backpack Trails 7.4
    • Quilt barns 7.5
    • Events 7.6
      • Wild Turkey Festival 7.6.1
      • Ridgetop Music Festival 7.6.2
      • Vinton County Air Show 7.6.3
  • Communities 8
    • Villages 8.1
    • Townships 8.2
    • Unincorporated communities 8.3
    • Ghost towns 8.4
  • See also 9
  • References 10
  • External links 11

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 415 square miles (1,070 km2), of which 412 square miles (1,070 km2) is land and 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2) (0.6%) is water.[5]

Waterways

Most of Vinton County is in the Raccoon Creek watershed. Most of the rest of the county, to the west, is in the Salt Creek watershed.[6]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 12,806 people, 4,892 households, and 3,551 families residing in the county. The population density was 31 people per square mile (12/km²). There were 5,653 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.08% White, 0.35% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. 0.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,892 households out of which 34.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.20% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.40% were non-families. 23.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.90% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 23.10% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,465, and the median income for a family was $34,371. Males had a median income of $30,936 versus $21,257 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,731. About 15.10% of families and 20.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.60% of those under age 18 and 13.50% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure

Vinton County has a three-member Board of County Commissioners that administers and oversees the various county departments, similar to all but two of the 88 Ohio counties. The elected commissioners serve four-year terms. The elected commissioners are Michael Bledsoe, Tim Eberts, and Jerry Zinn.[13]

Emergency services

The following emergency services, with their locations, serve the county:[14]

Post Offices

There are post offices in the following Vinton County communities:[15]

Utilities

The following utilities serve Vinton County:[16]

Phone, Internet and cable

Gas and electricity

Water and garbage disposal

Education

The entire county is served by the Vinton County Local School District which operates the following schools:[17]

Transportation

Highways

Airports

Vinton County has one public airport, the Vinton County Airport (K22I/22I). The runway is a 3725' x 75' asphalt, east-west (09/27) runway with a single intersecting taxiway. Navigation and radio equipment includes a two-light PAPI for runway 27, Pilot Controlled Lighting and UNICOM.[18]

The airport is leased to the Vinton County Pilots & Booster Association by the County, who raise funds to maintain and update the airport. As of 2015, the boosters are raising funds to finance a 2000 foot runway extension and resurfacing project. The airport is equipped to provide basic service to piston-engined general aviation aircraft. Flight instruction services are also available.[19]

Media

Vinton County is served by one local newspaper outlet, the Vinton County Courier, a print newspaper and website.[20]

Tourism

Covered bridges

Mt. Olive Covered Bridge
Ponn Covered Bridge prior to arson

There are four covered bridges located around Vinton County. The most famous bridge was the Ponn Bridge, also known as the Humpback Bridge. It was built in 1874 and was the longest one in the county. The bridge's name came from the shape of the bridge and there are only a few 'humpback' bridges left around the world. This bridge was burned down in June, 2013 by arsonists.[21] In 1875, the Mt. Olive Bridge was built by a Civil War veteran named George Washington Pilcher. This bridge is open to foot traffic and goes over the Middle Fork Salt Creek. The Bay Bridge is located on the Vinton County Fairgrounds. It was moved to the fairgrounds in 1967 and is still open to pedestrians. The Cox Bridge was built in 1884. The bridge is open to foot traffic and has a picnic area near it. The Arbaugh Bridge was built in 1871, making it the oldest covered bridge in the county. The bridge is the only one open to vehicles thanks to a grant that allowed for renovations.

State Parks and Recreation Areas

Lake Hope State Park

There are eight recreation areas in Vinton County. The state parks consist of Lake Alma State Park located in Wellston, Ohio and Lake Hope State Park located in McArthur, Ohio. There are also three state forests consisting of Richland Furnace State Forest, Tar Hollow State Forest, and Zaleski State Forest. Along with these, there is the Wayne National Forest, which covers many other counties in Ohio besides Vinton County, Raccoon Ecological Management Area located on State Route 160, and the Wellston Wildlife Area and Lake Rupert located on State Route 683. There are also many more public areas within a short distance of Vinton County.[22]

Lake Hope Bike Trails

Lake Hope State Park is located in Vinton and Athens Counties. There are five loop trails in the park ranging from 4.5 miles to 16 miles. The Hope Furnace Trail loop is the shortest of the trails at 4.5 miles. The Sidewinder Loop is 5.5 miles, the Copperhead Loop is 10 miles, and the New Big Loop is 15 miles. The longest of the trails in the Old Big Loop at 16 miles.[23]

Zaleski Backpack Trails

There are two trails in Zaleski State Forest, a trail of 23.5 miles and a day trail of 10 miles.[24]

Quilt barns

Throughout Vinton County, 27 quilt barns are scattered by the roadways. They are located on Vinton County's Quilt Trail.[25]

  • Liberty Star Basket
  • Basket Weave
  • A Pig's Tail
  • Christmas Star
  • Country Farm
  • On Wings of Eagles
  • Corn and Beans
  • Turkey Tracks
  • Maple Leaf
  • Mountains
  • Ohio Star
  • The Fan
  • Follow the Drinking Gourd
  • Summer Winds
  • There's No Place Like Home
  • Pine Tree
  • Mosaic
  • Autumn Sojourn
  • Whirlygig
  • Airplane
  • Cross and Crowns
  • Schoolhouse
  • Farm Friendliness
  • Anvil
  • Shortcut to School
  • Horse Squares
  • V-Block

Events

Wild Turkey Festival

The Wild Turkey Festival is a music festival held in McArthur, Ohio, on the first weekend of May, beginning on the Thursday evening and concluding on the Sunday afternoon. A parade runs through the town on the Saturday night.[26]

Ridgetop Music Festival

Every August, the Ridgetop Music Festival is held at the Vinton County Airport which offers music and airplane rides throughout the festival.[27]

Vinton County Air Show

The air show is held on the third Sunday in September. The show is the biggest free air show in Ohio and includes food and aerial acts.[28]

Communities

Map of Vinton County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Villages

Townships

Unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Vinton County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Retrieved April 28, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Vinton County data".  
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  6. ^ "State of Ohio GIS Databases". Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 11, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  13. ^ "County Commissioners". Vinton County Ohio Homepage. Retrieved May 4, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Vinton County: Emergency Services". Retrieved July 23, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Vinton County: Postal Offices- Zip Codes". Retrieved July 23, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Vinton County: Utilities". Retrieved July 23, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Vinton County: Local Schools and Higher Education". Retrieved July 23, 2014. 
  18. ^ "AirNav: 22I - Vinton County Airport". AirNav, LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2015. 
  19. ^ "About Us: Vinton County Airport". Vintoncountyairport.com. Retrieved May 12, 2015. 
  20. ^ http://www.vintondaily.com
  21. ^ "Covered Bridges". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2014. 
  22. ^ "Ohio State Parks and Public Recreation Areas in Vinton County, Ohio". Vinton County: Conventrion & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2014. 
  23. ^ "Lake Hope Mountain Bike Trail". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Zaleski Backpack Trail". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Quilt Barns". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2014. 
  26. ^ "Vinton County Wild Turkey Festival". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2014. 
  27. ^ "Ridgetop Music Festival". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2014. 
  28. ^ "Vinton County Air Show". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2014. 

External links

  • Vinton County Government website
  • Vinton County Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • Herbert Wescoat Memorial Library serving Vinton County
  • Public Lands Map of Vinton County

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