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Vitesse

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Vitesse

Vitesse Arnhem
Vitesse logo
Full name Stichting Betaald Voetbal Vitesse
Nickname(s) Vitas
FC Hollywood aan de Rijn (FC Hollywood on the Rhine)
Founded 14 May 1892 (1892-05-14)
Ground GelreDome
Arnhem
Ground Capacity 25,500
Owner Aleksandr Chigirinski
Chairman Bert Roetert
Manager Peter Bosz
League Eredivisie
2013–14 Eredivisie, 6th
Website Club home page

Stichting Betaald Voetbal Vitesse, commonly referred to simply as Vitesse (internationally known as Vitesse Arnhem) is a Dutch football club based in Arnhem, which was founded on 14 May 1892. Vitesse has enjoyed some success in the Eredivisie and featured in the UEFA Cup competition. The owner is a Russian businessman, which makes Vitesse the first and only Dutch football club owned by a foreigner.[1]

History

The idea of conceiving a football team stemmed from the club's early roots as a cricket club.

Vitesse once attracted big name signings into its ranks including Roy Makaay, Nikos Machlas, Sander Westerveld, Danko Lazovic, Pierre van Hooijdonk, Mahamadou Diarra and Philip Cocu. In the 1980s, the club was threatened with bankruptcy, the solution to which was to form a new administrative board to govern both the professionals and the amateur sides. This is because up until the 1980s, the club had incorporated both its professional and its amateur players into its club structure. In 1990, the club reached its most recent KNVB Cup final when it was defeated by PSV Eindhoven on a penalty-kick in the 75' minute from Stan Valckx at De Kuip on 25 April 1990.[2][3] It was restructured again in 2003 when it could have gone bankrupt, when the timely intervention of the Arnhem city council helped to create a financial rescue package to salvage the club.[4]

In 2010 the club was bought by Georgian businessman Merab Jordania, who is a good friend with Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich.[5] Shortly thereafter, the two clubs agreed to a partnership and in the years following, many young Chelsea players have the move to Vitesse on loan,[6] including Nemanja Matić,[7] Gaël Kakuta[8] and both Tomáš Kalas and Patrick van Aanholt twice.[9][10] The club competed in European competition for the first time in a decade when it qualified for the 2012–13 UEFA Europa League[11] as they were winners of the European playoff at the end of the 2011-12 Eredivisie campaign, defeating RKC Waalwijk 5-2 in the two-legged final.[12][13]

Vitesse finished the 2012-13 Eredivisie campaign in fourth place and thus qualified for the Third Qualifying Round of the Europa League for the following season.[14] After leading the club to their impressive fourth place finish, manager Fred Rutten stepped down from his post after only one season in charge and was replaced by former Vitesse and Feyenoord midfielder Peter Bosz.[15] In July 2013, two of Vitesse's most important first-team players, Marco van Ginkel and Wilfried Bony, were sold for club record fees at the time to Chelsea and Swansea City of the Premier League respectively.[16] Van Ginkel had been named the Dutch Talent of the Year for the previous season and Bony was the Eredivisie top scorer with 31 goals and was named the Dutch Footballer of the Year.[17][18]

Stadium

GelreDome with closed roof and pitch outside
Training accommodation at the National Sports Centre Papendal
Its home is the unique GelreDome stadium opened in 1998, featuring a retractable roof and a convertible pitch that can be retracted when unused during concerts or other events held at the stadium.

The stadium was finished in time to host three group stage matches during the Euro 2000 tournament held in the Netherlands and Belgium.[19] Its current capacity for football is 25,000, the maximum capacity for shows is around 34,000, and the average league attendance in recent years was just below 20,000.[20] Their previous home was the Nieuw Monnikenhuize.

Training accommodation

The clubs training ground and youth development system are based at the National Sports Centre Papendal. As of 2012 the clubs pitches have been renewed, where under-soil heating was introduced; one pitch has artificial turf. The new accommodation was completed and opened in the first half of 2013.

Ownership

On 16 August 2010, the former Merab Jordania became the owner of Vitesse. Jordania expressed his ambition for Vitesse to become champion of the Eredivisie league within three years. His first action as owner involved attracting 8 new young players, though no established stars. However, the takeover resulted in some controversy. Some commentators arguing that this takeover was the Dutch equivalent of what had happened in English football, financial globalization and possibly longer-term destabilization, as expressed in the opinions in the local papers. On 22 October 2013 it was announced that Russian billionaire Aleksandr Tsjigirinski was the new owner of Vitesse, while Merab Jordania would remain as chairman of the club.[21]

Current squad

As of 14 August 2014[22]

For recent transfers, see List of Dutch football transfers summer 2014

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.
No. Position Player
1 GK Eloy Room
2 DF Wallace (on loan from Chelsea)
3 DF Dan Mori
5 DF Kelvin Leerdam
6 MF Josh McEachran (on loan from Chelsea)
7 MF Marko Vejinović
8 MF Valeri Kazaishvili
9 FW Uroš Đurđević
10 MF Davy Pröpper
11 MF Denys Oliynyk
14 FW Abiola Dauda
15 DF Arnold Kruiswijk
No. Position Player
18 MF Marvelous Nakamba
20 MF Zakaria Labyad (on loan from Sporting CP)
22 GK Piet Velthuizen
23 DF Jan-Arie van der Heijden (vice-captain)
25 MF Gino Bosz
27 MF Bertrand Traoré (on loan from Chelsea)
30 MF Renato Ibarra
35 DF Rochdi Achenteh
37 DF Guram Kashia (captain)
40 DF Kevin Diks
48 GK Jeroen Houwen

On loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.
No. Position Player
MF Robin Gosens (at FC Dordrecht until 30 June 2015)
FW Mo Hamdaoui (at FC Dordrecht until 30 June 2015)

Retired numbers

04 Theo Bos, defender (1983–98) — posthumous honour.
12reserved for the club supporters

Vitesse-managers since 1914

Leo Beenhakker
Henk ten Cate
Aad de Mos
Hans Westerhof

Club officials

Position Name Since
Club owner Alexander Chigirinsky 22 October 2013
Chairman Bert Roetert 10 December 2013
Managing Director Joost de Wit 16 May 2013
Technical Director Mohammed Allach 1 October 2013
Manager Peter Bosz 19 June 2013
Assistant manager Hendrie Krüzen 19 June 2013
Assistant manager Rob Maas 12 June 2014
Assistant manager John Lammers 1 July 2014
Assistant manager (goalkeeper coach) Raimond van der Gouw 1 July 2009

Honours

League

Runners-up (5): 1897–98, 1902–03, 1912–13, 1913–14, 1914–15
Third Place (1): 1997–98
Winners (2): 1976–77, 1988–89
Runners-up (2): 1959–60, 1973–74
Winners (1): 1965–66

Cup

Runners-up (3): 1912, 1927, 1990

Individual Achievements

Vitesse in Europe

  • Group = group game
  • Q = qualifying round
  • 1R = first round
  • 2R = second round
  • 3R = third round
  • 1/8 = 1/8 final
Season Competition Round Country Club Score Goalscorers Vitesse
1978/79 Intertoto Cup Group Verona 2–1, 0–2 Bursac, Hofs / (-)
Group RWDM 0–5, 0–2 (-) / (-)
Group Troyes AC 5–3, 2–1 Bleijenberg (2), Heezen, Mulderij, Bosveld / Bleijenberg, Beukhof
1990/91 UEFA Cup 1R Derry City FC 1–0, 0–0 Loeffen / (-)
2R Dundee United 1–0, 4–0 Eijer / Latuheru (2), Van den Brom, Eijer
1/8 Sporting CP 0–2, 1–2 (-) / Van Arum
1992/93 UEFA Cup 1R Derry City FC 3–0, 2–1 Van den Brom (2), Van Arum / Straal, Laamers
2R KV Mechelen 1–0, 1–0 Van den Brom / Cocu
1/8 Real Madrid 0–1, 0–1 (-) / (-)
1993/94 UEFA Cup 1R Norwich City 0–3, 0–0 (-) / (-)
1994/95 UEFA Cup 1R AC Parma 1–0, 0–2 Gillhaus / (-)
1997/98 UEFA Cup 1R SC Braga 2–1, 0–2 Curovic, Trustfull / (-)
1998/99 UEFA Cup 1R AEK Athens 3–0, 3–3 Laros, Perovic, Machlas / Machlas (2), Reuser
2R Girondins de Bordeaux 0–1, 1–2 (-) / Jochemsen
1999/00 UEFA Cup 1R SC Beira-Mar 2–1, 0–0 Van Hooijdonk, Grozdic / (-)
2R RC Lens 1–4, 1–1 Van Hooijdonk / Kreek
2000/01 UEFA Cup 1R Maccabi Haifa FC 3–0, 1–2 Martel, Peeters, Amoah / Amoah
2R Internazionale 0–0, 1–1 (-) / Peeters
2002/03 UEFA Cup 1R FC Rapid Bucureşti 1–1, 1–0 Peeters / Peeters
2R Werder Bremen 2–1, 3–3 Amoah, Verlaat (o.g.) / Levchenko, Claessens, Mbamba
3R Liverpool F.C. 0–1, 0–1 (-) / (-)
2012/13 Europa League Q2 Lokomotiv Plovdiv 4–4, 3–1 Van Ginkel (2), Reis, Bony / Van Ginkel, Van Aanholt, Bony
Q3 Anzhi Makhachkala 0–2, 0–2 (-) / (-)
2013/14 Europa League Q3 Petrolul Ploiești 1–1, 1–2 Reis / Van der Heijden

Club records

Domestic results

Below is a table with Vitesse's domestic results since the introduction of the Eredivisie in 1956.

Statistics

Eredivisie

Matches played 986
Matches won 375
Matches drawn 282
Matches lost 329
Points (two points-system) 1032
Goals for 1452
Goal against 1386
Seasons 30
Best ranking 3 (1997/1998)
Worst ranking 18 (1971/1972)
As of 1 August 2014
 

Eerste Divisie

Matches played 852
Matches won 379
Matches drawn 215
Matches lost 258
Points (two points-system) 973
Goals for 1450
Goals against 1192
Seasons 25
Best ranking 1 (1976/77, 1988/89)
Worst ranking 17 (1984/85)
 

Tweede Divisie

Matches played 120
Matches won 57
Matches drawn 34
Matches lost 29
Points (two points-system) 148
Goals for 221
Goals against 165
Seasons 4
Best ranking 1 (1965/1966)
Worst ranking 9 (1963/1964)

Club topscorers by season

     

Affiliated teams

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Vitesse first Dutch club sold to foreign investor". RNW. 16 August 2010. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Vitesse driemaal bekerfinalist" (in Dutch). Vitesse. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Netherlands Cup Full Results 1970-1994". RSSSF. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Mysterious motivation at Vitesse Arnhem". ESPNFC. 22 September 2010. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Vitesse first Dutch club sold to foreign investor". Expatica. 16 August 2010. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Players admit Vitesse Arnhem attractive thanks to Chelsea partnership". Yahoo Sport. 16 February 2012. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Vitesse huurt drietal van Chelsea". nos.nl. 2010-08-23. 
  8. ^ "Gael Kakuta says Chelsea's squad is too big and he is happy at Vitesse Arnhem". Sky Sports. 22 March 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Presentatie nieuwe nummer 2: Tomáš Kalas". Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  10. ^ VITESSE LOANS FOR YOUNG PAIR
  11. ^ "2012/13 UEFA Europa League: Vitesse/Matches". UEFA. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  12. ^ "Europa League Play-offs - Semi-finals - Netherlands". Soccerway. Retrieved 25 May 2012. 
  13. ^ "Europa League Play-offs - Finals - Netherlands". Soccerway. Retrieved 25 May 2012. 
  14. ^ "Bosz accepts task of succeeding Rutten at Vitesse". UEFA. 20 June 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Voetbal" (in Dutch). Vitesse lijkt met Peter Bosz de opvolger van Fred Rutten binnen te hebben. 16 June 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  16. ^ "Transfer latest: Swansea confirm capture of record signing Wilfried Bony from Vitesse Arnhem". The Independent. 11 July 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "What can Chelsea fans expect from Marco van Ginkel?". Metro. 9 July 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Wilfried Bony: Swansea complete club-record £12m signing". BBC Sport. 11 July 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "Venues prepare for summer drama". UEFA.com (Union of European Football Associations). Archived from the original on 10 August 2001. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  20. ^ "OVER GELREDOME FEITEN EN CIJFERS" (in Dutch). GelreDome. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  21. ^ Alexander Chigirinskiy (50) neemt aandelen Vitesse over, Vitesse.nl, 22 oktober 2013
  22. ^ "Vitesse". Vitesse. Retrieved 14 August 2014. 

External links

  • Official website (Dutch)
  • Official supporters site (Dutch)
  • Official GelreDome site (Dutch)
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