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Wake Forest University School of Law

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Wake Forest University School of Law

Wake Forest University School of Law
Motto Pro Humanitate (Latin)
Motto in English For Humanity
Established 1894
Type Private
Interim Dean Suzanne Reynolds
Academic staff 92
Students 463
Location Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
Colors Old Gold and Black
         
Website http://www.law.wfu.edu

The Wake Forest University School of Law is one of the professional graduate schools of Wake Forest University. Located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Wake Forest University School of Law is a private American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). The school was established in 1894. U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks the school among the Top Tier Law Schools in the nation. The current dean is Blake Morant.

Wake Forest University School of Law has a faculty of 52 Resident Faculty Members and 40 Extended Faculty Members.[1]

The school is known for emphasizing small classes, usually limiting the first year class size to about 150 students. The Class of 2012 had a 25/75% GPA range of 3.26 to 3.71 and LSAT range of 160 to 164.[2] According to Wake Forest's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 56.6% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[3]

Degrees

The school offers the Juris Doctor, LLM, and S.J.D. degrees, as well as four joint degrees (JD/MBA, JD/MA in Religion, JD/Master of Divinity, and JD/MA in Bioethics). The school also offers a one-year Master of Studies in Law (MSL) degree.

Publications

The school has three student-run law journals. The school's flagship journal is the Wake Forest Law Review.[4] The school also publishes two specialized journals, the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy[5] and the Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law.[6]

Rankings

The Wake Forest University School of Law was ranked 31st in the 2015 U.S. News & World Report Best Law Schools rankings.[7]


Student organizations

Student opportunities

Clinics

The Law School offers six legal clinics, or programs that allow students to attain practical legal experience through providing legal services to real clients.[10]

  • Appellate Advocacy Clinic - Students represent clients in a variety of appellate courts, including the Fourth Circuit and the Seventh Circuit. Students handle an actual appeal from start to finish, with advice and assistance from their professor, who is counsel of record. Students also travel to Washington, D.C., to observe arguments at the United States Supreme Court.[11]
  • Child Advocacy Clinic - Students represent children in custody disputes, domestic violence situations, and in issues involving the public school system.[12]
  • Community Law and Business Clinic - A new program, this clinic provides law and graduate business students with an opportunity to develop skills needed to practice in the increasingly complex legal and regulatory environment they will encounter as professionals.[13]
  • Elder Law Clinic - Students provides free legal assistance to moderate income seniors in a variety of legal matters.[14]
  • Innocence and Justice Clinic - This clinic has its origins in the Innocence Project in which Wake Forest students review and investigate claims of innocence to determine whether DNA evidence existed that could exonerate inmates.[15]
  • Civil & Criminal Externship Clinic - Formerly referred to as the Litigation Clinic, students have the opportunity to receive real world practice experience by working with local attorneys. During the semester, all students receive civil placements with local firms, in-house counsel offices, and the Office of the United States Attorney for the Middle District of North Carolina. Students also spend half of their semester working in a criminal placement. These placements have included private firms as well as prosecutors' and public defenders' offices.[16]

Employment

According to Wake Forest's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 58.5% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[17] Wake Forest's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 33.3%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[18]

ABA Employment Summary for 2013 Graduates[19]
Employment Status Percentage
Employed - Bar Passage Required (Full-Time, Long-Term)
  
58.49%
Employed - Bar Passage Required (Part-Time and/or Short-Term)
  
12.58%
Employed - J.D. Advantage
  
3.77%
Employed - Professional Position
  
3.14%
Employed - Non-Professional Position
  
0.0%
Employed - Undeterminable
  
0.0%
Pursuing Graduate Degree Full Time
  
0.63%
Unemployed - Start Date Deferred
  
0.63%
Unemployed - Not Seeking
  
0.0%
Unemployed - Seeking
  
17.61%
Employment Status Unknown
  
3.14%
Total of 159 Graduates

Costs

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at Wake Forest University School of Law for the 2013-2014 academic year is $63,518.[20] The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years is $234,471.[21]

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ "Faculty Profiles | Faculty | Wake Forest School of Law". Law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  2. ^ "Fast Facts | Admissions & Financial Aid | Wake Forest School of Law". Law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  3. ^ "Employment Statistics". 
  4. ^ "Wake Forest Law Review - Home". wakeforestlawreview.com. Retrieved 2013-03-24. 
  5. ^ "Journal of Law & Policy | Wake Forest School of Law". Lawpolicyjournal.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  6. ^ "Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law | Wake Forest School of Law". Ipjournal.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  7. ^ U.S. News & World Report Best Law Schools, 2015
  8. ^ "Wake Forest School of Law Program in Washington | Wake Forest School of Law". Dc-externship.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  9. ^ "Study Abroad | Wake Forest School of Law". Studyabroad.law.wfu.edu. 2012-10-30. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  10. ^ "Clinics & Field Work | Academics | Wake Forest School of Law". Academics.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  11. ^ "Appellate Advocacy Clinic | Wake Forest School of Law". Appellate-clinic.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  12. ^ "Child Advocacy Clinic | Wake Forest School of Law". Child-clinic.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  13. ^ "Community Law & Business Clinic | Wake Forest School of Law". Community-clinic.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  14. ^ "Elder Law Clinic | Wake Forest School of Law". Elder-clinic.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  15. ^ "Innocence and Justice Clinic | Wake Forest School of Law". Innocence-clinic.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  16. ^ "Litigation Clinic | Wake Forest School of Law". Litigation-clinic.law.wfu.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  17. ^ "Employment Statistics". 
  18. ^ "Wake Forest University Profile". 
  19. ^ "Employment Summary for 2013 Graduates". 
  20. ^ "Tuition and Expenses". 
  21. ^ "Wake Forest University Profile". 

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