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.mil

mil
Defense Information Systems Agency
Introduced 1985
TLD type Sponsored top-level domain
Status Active
Registry Defense Information Systems Agency
Sponsor DoD Network Information Center
Intended use Military entities
Actual use Agencies, services and divisions of the United States Department of Defense
Registration restrictions Tightly restricted to eligible agencies
Structure Divisions of particular services usually have third and higher level subdomains, such as within army.mil for United States Army sites.
Documents RFC 920; RFC 1591
Dispute policies None
DNSSEC Yes

The domain name mil is the military. It was one of the first top-level domains, created in January 1985.[1]

The United States is the only country that has a top-level domain for its military, a legacy of the United States' military role in the creation of the Internet. Other countries often use second-level domains for this purpose, e.g., mod.uk for the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defence. Canada uses norad.mil with the United States as they jointly operate the North American Aerospace Defense Command.

Despite having a dedicated top-level domain, the US military also uses edu domains for its service academies: the United States Military Academy, United States Coast Guard Academy, United States Naval Academy, and the United States Air Force Academy can all be reached using either an edu or a mil domain name. The official athletic program sites of the three academies that are members of NCAA Division I (Army, Navy, Air Force) use com domains. The Department of Defense itself uses gov for its home page, with at least three second-level domains within mil (defense, dod, and pentagon) redirecting to its domain name www.defense.gov.

The United States Coast Guard, like other military services, uses the mil domain, although during statutory peacetime the service falls under the United States Department of Homeland Security.[2]

References

  1. ^ RFC 920, Domain Requirements, J. Postel, J. Reynolds, The Internet Society (October 1984)
  2. ^ United States Coast Guard Regulations http://www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/5000-5999/CIM_5000_3B.pdf

External links

  • IANA .mil whois information
  • Mil Domain Used by US Airforce
  • Mil Domain Used by US Army
  • Mil Domain Used by US Marines
  • Mil Domain Used by US Navy
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