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11th Air Refueling Squadron

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Title: 11th Air Refueling Squadron  
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11th Air Refueling Squadron

11th Air Refueling Squadron
11th Air Refueling Squadron emblem[1]
Active 1942-1944; 1955-1994
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Type Air Refueling
Role Aerial Refueling
Part of AMC/97 ARW/
Garrison/HQ Altus AFB, Oklahoma
Decorations AFOUA

The 11th Air Refueling Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 340th Air Refueling Wing, stationed at Altus AFB, Oklahoma. It was inactivated on 1 October 1994.[2]

History

During World War II the squadron trained crews and technicians for photographic reconnaissance and mapping, 1942-1944.

Reactivated in 1955 under Strategic Air Command (SAC) as a KC-97 air refueling squadron, it participated in SAC tests, exercises, and air refueling operations and other Air Force commands in North America, Europe, and the Pacific Far East, and Southeast Asia, from 1955 onward. It won numerous wards for its operational performance.

It was upgraded in 1965 to the KC-135 Stratotanker jet. In 1972 the 11th supported two large-scale aircraft movements to Southeast Asia, 5-6 and 8–9 April, and on 12 May and over the next three days it deployed all available tankers and crews at Takhli RTAFB, Thailand. About one-half of squadron personnel formed a rear echelon at Altus AFB. The forward echelon manned the 4101st Air Refueling Squadron, Provisional. Some 11th ARS personnel were returning to Altus AFB on 4 November 1972, but some of the squadron remained on temporary duty in SEA. By January 1973 about half of the 11th’s KC-135s had returned and by June 1973 all aircraft and crews had returned. The 11th continued its normal SEA support as well as its many other global commitments. The squadron refueled its first C-5 Galaxy on 1 May 1974.

The squadron's resources were divided on 1 July 1977, a part being retained by the 11th, the remainder used to man the new 340th Air Refueling Group, Heavy, and the 340th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron. The new group was assigned to the 19th Air Division and the 11th to the group.

On 19 September 1985 the 11th Air Refueling Squadron was consolidated with the 11th Combat Mapping Squadron, a unit that was last active 1 May 1944. This action was directed by Department of the Air Force Letter DAF/MPM 662q Attachment 1 (Active Units), 19 September 1985. The Consolidated Unit will retain the Designation of 11th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy.

The squadron was inactivated in 1994 as part of the drawdown of the USAF after the end of the Cold War.

Lineage

  • Constituted as the 5th Mapping Squadron on 1 May 1942
Activated on 7 May 1942
Redesignated the 11th Photographic Mapping Squadron on 9 June 1942
Redesignated the 11th Photographic Squadron (Heavy) on 6 February 1943
Redesignated the 11th Combat Mapping Squadron on 11 August 1943
Disbanded on 1 May 1944[3]
  • Reconstituted, and constituted (19 Sep 1985) with 11th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy
Constituted as the 11th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy on 10 August 1955
Activated on 1 December 1955
Redesignated the 11th Air Refueling Squadron, Medium, on 15 September 1958
Redesignated the 11th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, on 25 June 1965
Redesignated the 11th Air Refueling Squadron on 1 September 1991
Inactivated on 1 October 1994

Assignments

Stations

Aircraft

Decorations

See also


References

Notes

  1. ^ Air Force FOIA Electronic Reading Room: 11th Air Refueling Squadron emblem
  2. ^ Air Force combat wings : lineage and honors histories 1947-1977
  3. ^ a b c d Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 161
  4. ^ a b Ravenstein, pp. 26-27
  5. ^ Ravenstein, pp. 180-181
  6. ^ Ravenstein, p. 272
  7. ^ "Factsheet 820 Strategic Aerospace Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. 10 November 2007. Archived from the original on 30 October 2012. Retrieved 5 March 2014. 
  8. ^ AF FOIA Request 2009-01965, 13 July 2009

Bibliography

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

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