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1911 International Lawn Tennis Challenge

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Title: 1911 International Lawn Tennis Challenge  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: New Zealand Davis Cup team, Davis Cup, 2011 Davis Cup Asia/Oceania Zone, 2011 Davis Cup, 2010 Davis Cup
Collection: 1911 in American Sports, 1911 in New Zealand Sport, 1911 in Tennis, Davis Cups by Year
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1911 International Lawn Tennis Challenge

The 1911 International Lawn Tennis Challenge was the tenth edition of what is now known as the Davis Cup, named after the American tennis player Dwight F. Davis.[1] After no country decided to challenge Australasia in 1910, only the British Isles and the United States would challenge for the Cup, for the third straight edition. Also for the third straight edition, the Americans would beat the British to earn the right to play for the Cup, and for the third straight edition, the Aussies would beat the Americans for the title.

For the first time, however, teams were allowed to use substitute players in dead rubbers, with the United States playing Maurice E. McLoughlin in singles after Australasia had clinched the final. The final also marked the first time a tie was played in New Zealand, when it was played at Lancaster Park[2] in Christchurch. Tony Wilding, whose home city was Christchurch, and Australian Norman Brookes won the 1907 tournament for Australasia; the first time that America had been beaten in this tournament.[3] With Wilding being absent in Europe for the 1911 competition, the chances of the Australasian team were weakened.[4]

Rain delayed the beginning of the games scheduled for 29 December 1911, and the 1911 Davis Cup event was held between 1 and 3 January 1912. Norman Brookes beat Beals Wright in the opening match. Rodney Heath increased the lead for Australasia by beating William Larned. Australasia retained the Davis Cup through a win in the doubles, with Brookes and Alfred Dunlop being successful over Wright and Maurice E. McLoughlin. The fourth match was defaulted by Wright, and Larned stepped aside to give the younger McLoughlin the opportunity to play Brookes. After leading 2 sets to 1, Brookes came back and won the match, and gave Australasia a clean 5–0 victory.[5]

1911 Davis Cup Challenge Round match between Australasia and the United States at Hagley Park, Christchurch, New Zealand on 1–3 January 1912

Final


United States
4
West Side Tennis Club, New York, United States[6]
9–12 September 1911[6][7]

British Isles
1
1 2 3 4 5
1
William Larned
Charles P. Dixon
6
3
2
6
6
3
3
6
7
5
 [6]
2
Maurice E. McLoughlin
Arthur Lowe
7
5
6
1
4
6
4
6
6
3
 [6]
3
Tom Bundy / Raymond D. Little
Alfred Beamish / Charles P. Dixon
3
6
5
7
4
6
     [8]
4
William Larned
Arthur Lowe
6
3
1
6
7
5
6
1
   [7]
5
Maurice E. McLoughlin
Charles P. Dixon
8
6
3
6
6
3
6
2
   [7]

Challenge round


Australasia
4
Hagley Park, Christchurch, New Zealand[9]
1–3 January 1912[9][10]

United States
0
1 2 3 4 5
1
Norman Brookes
Beals Wright
6
4
2
6
6
3
6
3
   [9]
2
Rodney Heath
William Larned
2
6
6
1
7
5
6
2
   [9]
3
Norman Brookes / Alfred Dunlop
Maurice E. McLoughlin / Beals Wright
6
4
5
7
7
5
6
4
   [10]
4
Norman Brookes
Maurice E. McLoughlin
6
4
3
6
4
6
6
3
6
4
 [10]
5
Rodney Heath
Beals Wright
          not
played
[10]

References

  1. ^ "The Davis Cup".  
  2. ^ "1912".  
  3. ^ "Tennis Champions".  
  4. ^ "Lawn Tennis".  
  5. ^ Cole, Charles (31 December 2011). "Cup's Christchurch ties".  
  6. ^ a b c d "Americans Lead In Tennis Play.".  
  7. ^ a b c "Yankee Players Defeat English.".  
  8. ^ "Americans Win Tennis Games. Scored Heavily Against Britons in Matches to DEcide Challengers. Dixon Set Up a Great Argument with the Champion Larned.".  
  9. ^ a b c d "Larned and Wright Lose in Cup Tennis; Americans Humbled at Christchurch Nets by Heath and Brookes." (PDF).  
  10. ^ a b c d "Clean Sweep in Tennis; American Team Loses All Its Matches to Australasians for Davis Cup." (PDF).  
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