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1967 In Aviation

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1967 In Aviation

Years in aviation: 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s
Years: 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1967:

Contents

  • Events 1
    • January 1.1
    • February 1.2
    • March 1.3
    • April 1.4
    • May 1.5
    • June 1.6
    • July 1.7
    • August 1.8
    • September 1.9
    • October 1.10
    • November 1.11
    • December 1.12
  • First flights 2
    • January 2.1
    • February 2.2
    • March 2.3
    • April 2.4
    • May 2.5
    • June 2.6
    • August 2.7
    • October 2.8
    • November 2.9
  • Entered service 3
    • May 3.1
    • June 3.2
    • July 3.3
    • August 3.4
    • September 3.5
    • November 3.6
  • References 4

Events

January

February

March

April

May

June

  • MiG fighters in North Vietnam withdraw to bases in the People's Republic of China.[12]
  • June 3 – The Air Ferry Douglas DC-4 G-APYK. on a charter flight from Manston Airport to Perpignan, crashes into Mount Canigou, France, killing all 88 passengers and crew.
  • June 4 – The British Midland Airways Canadair C-4 Argonaut G-ALHG suffers a fuel system problem and crashes in Hopes Carr, Stockport, England, killing 72 of the 84 people on board and seriously injuring all 12 survivors.
  • June 5
    • The Six-Day War begins between Israel and her Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria; Israel has 286 combat aircraft, while Egypt has 430, Syria has 127,[13] and Jordan has 24.[14] Israel opens the war with an 80-minute series of surprise pre-emptive Israeli Air Force strikes against Egyptian Air Force bases which destroy over 250 Egyptian aircraft, almost all of them on the ground, kill some 100 of Egypt‍ '​s 350 combat pilots, destroy 23 radar and surface-to-air missile sites, and crater the runways of ten major air bases. Egypt is caught with only five aircraft – the Egyptian Air Force‍ '​s Ilyushin Il-14 (NATO reporting name "Crate") airborne command post and four unarmed trainers – airborne, and the trainers are shot down. Twenty-eight Egyptian MiGs get into the air, but Israeli aircraft shoot 12 of them down and the remainder crash when they cannot find a serviceable runway to land on; the Il-14 lands at Cairo International Airport, the only Egyptian plane to land safely anywhere during the morning. The Egyptian Air Force is knocked out of the war. Israel loses 19 aircraft during the strikes – two Dassault Mystères in air-to-air combat, one Sud Aviation Vautour to ground fire, and 16 to non-combat causes.[15]
    • The Royal Jordanian Army shells Israel‍ '​s Ramat David Airbase and 16 Royal Jordanian Air Force Hawker Hunters attack Israeli airbases and villages around Netanya, Kfar Sirkin, and Kfar Saba, destroying one Nord Noratlas transport plane. After the Jordanian planes return to base, Israeli Air Force aircraft diverted from operations against Egypt attack their bases at Amman and Mafraq, shooting down two Hunters, destroying 16 more and extensively damaging the remaining six, all on the ground, and also destroying two helicopters and three light transport aircraft on the ground. American pilots fly five F-104 Starfighters in Jordan they have not yet turned over to the Jordanians to Turkey as soon as the war begins, and Jordan is left with no operational combat aircraft.[16]
    • In the afternoon, the Israeli Air Force attacks all five Syrian Air Force bases, destroying 51 fighters, two bombers, and two helicopters on the ground, putting all the bases out of service, and shooting down four MiG-17 (NATO reporting name "Fresco") fighters in air-to-air combat. It also attacks airbases in western Iraq, destroying 20 more aircraft there. Israel loses one Mystère.[17] Israel‍ '​s successful attacks on its opponents allow the Israeli Air Force to focus on ground-attack missions for the remainder of the war.
    • Israeli Air Force Aérospatiale Super Frelon and Sikorsky S-58 helicopters carry 150 Israeli Army paratroopers into action in operations to reduce Egyptian Army positions around Umm Katef in the Sinai Peninsula.[18]
    • Boeing delivers its 1,000th jet airliner, a Boeing 707-120B built for American Airlines.
  • June 6 – Israeli aircraft mount heavy strikes against Royal Jordanian Army tanks in Jordan‍ '​s Dotan Valley.[19]
  • June 7
    • Israeli aircraft conduct heavy strikes against Syrian trenchlines and bunkers in the Golan Heights.[20]
    • Three Israeli Air Force Nord Noratlas transport planes land on the runway at Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, and discharge paratroopers, who seize the Egyptian base there. Later in the day, Israeli helicopters land paratroopers at nearby El-Tor, which they also capture.[21]
  • June 8
  • June 9 – The Israeli Air Force mounts a large, continuous attack against Syrian Army defensive poisitions in the Golan Heights, employing high-explosive bombs and napalm, and dropping bombs designed to crater runways on Syrian bunkers.[23]
  • June 10 – The Six-Day War ends in a complete Israeli triumph. During the war, the Arab countries have lost 452 aircraft, while Israel has lost 46.
  • June 17 – The Vietnam War‍ '​s heaviest air attacks in nine months are American strikes targeting railroads near Hanoi.[12]
  • June 18 – The first regularly scheduled winter flight to Antarctica takes place, when the U.S. Navy C-130L Hercules City of Christchurch – with the commander of U.S. Naval Support Force Antarctica, U.S. Navy Rear Admiral James Lloyd Abbot, Jr., in the cockpit alongside its pilot – flies from Christchurch, New Zealand, to McMurdo Station with 22 people (including two parties of scientists riding as passengers), 5,000 pounds (2,268 kg) of mail, and almost 3,000 pounds (1,361 kg) of fresh food on board. All previous winter flights to Antarctica had been solely for the emergency evacuation of medical patients. The aircraft returns to Christchurch the following day.[24][25]
  • June 23 – Mohawk Airlines Flight 40, a BAC 1-11 204AF, crashes at Blossburg, Pennsylvania, due to a non-return valve failure, killing all 34 passengers and crew. It is the deadliest accident in the history of Mohawk Airlines.
  • June 30 – Thai Airways International Flight 601, a Sud Aviation Caravelle, crashes into the South China Sea while on approach to Kai Tak Airport in Hong Kong, killing 24 of the 80 people on board and injuring all 56 survivors.

July

August

September

October

  • October 1 – Frontier Airlines purchases Central Airlines and takes over its airliner fleet and routes.
  • October 3
    • The U.S. Navy‍ '​s first dedicated search-and-rescue squadron, Helicopter Combat Support Squadron 7 (HC-7), makes its first rescue, saving an American airman downed in Haiphong Harbor, North Vietnam.[30]
    • U.S. Air Force Major William J. Knight sets a new world airspeed record in the North American X-15A-2, reaching Mach 6.72 (4,520 mph, 7,274 km/h), and lands safely despite multiple structural failures that cause the X-15‍ '​s scramjet module to separate from the aircraft and damage the fuel-jettison system. It will prove to be the highest speed achieved by any aircraft at any time during the 20th century.[32]
  • October 8
    • American aircraft strike Cat Bi airfield near Haiphong in North Vietnam for the first time.[12]
    • The first helicopter gunship designed as such to see combat, the U.S. Army‍ '​s AH-1G Cobra, flies its first combat mission when two AH-1Gs operating over South Vietnam escort U.S. Army transport helicopters, then support South Vietnamese troops by destroying four enemy fortifications and sinking 14 sampans.[33]
  • October 12 – The de Havilland DH.106 Comet 4B G-ARCO, operating as Cyprus Airways Flight 284, breaks up in mid-air and crashes into the Mediterranean Sea 22 miles (35 km) south of Demre, Turkey, killing all 66 people on board.
  • October 23 – American aircraft attack Phúc Yên Air Base, North Vietnam's largest airfield, for the first time.[12]

November

December

First flights

January

February

March

April

May

June

August

October

November

Entered service

May

June

July

August

September

November

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, p. 155.
  2. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 94.
  3. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 314.
  4. ^ Wilkinson, Stephan, "Amazing But True Stories," Aviation History, May 2014, p. 33.
  5. ^ TWA History Timeline
  6. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 25.
  7. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 77-78.
  8. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 26.
  9. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 182.
  10. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World‍ '​s Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1978, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 58.
  11. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 30.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, p. 156.
  13. ^ Cordesman, Anthony H., and Abraham R. Wagner, The Lessons of Modern War, Volume I: The Arab-Israeli Conflicts, 1973-1989, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1990, ISBN 0-8133-1329-5, p. 17.
  14. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 292.
  15. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, pp. 165-171.
  16. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, pp. 287, 289, 291-292.
  17. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 392.
  18. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, pp. 235-236.
  19. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, pp. 370-371.
  20. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 393.
  21. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, pp. 252-253.
  22. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 276.
  23. ^ Hammel, Eric, Six Days in June: How Israel Won the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992, ISBN 0-684-19390-6, p. 398.
  24. ^ http://www.southpolestation.com/trivia/igy2/tha.pdf southpolestation.com Hoshko, John, Jr., Lieutenant, USN, "Night Flight to Antarctica."
  25. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/j-lloyd-abbot-jr-navy-rear-admiral-who-led-flights-to-antarctica-dies-at-94/2012/09/15/c1fd247c-ff44-11e1-b287-8b9c63b32107_story.html Schudel, Matt, "Obituary: J. Lloyd Abbott, Jr., 94; Made First Winter Flights to Antarctica," The Washington Post, Sunday, September 16, 2012, p. C7.
  26. ^ Chronology of Significant Events in Naval Aviation: "Naval Air Transport" 1941 -- 1999
  27. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 216.
  28. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 84-85.
  29. ^ Gardiner, Robert, Conway‍ '​s All the World‍ '​s Fighting Ships 1947-1982, Part One: The Western Powers, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1983, ISBN 0-87021-918-9, p. 111.
  30. ^ a b Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 90.
  31. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 328.
  32. ^ a b Hallion, Richard P., "Across the Hypersonic Divide," Aviation History, July 2012, p. 42.
  33. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. p.86.
  34. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 85-86.
  35. ^ Fontenoy, Paul E., Aircraft Carriers, ABC-CLIO, 2006, ISBN 1-85109-573-X, p. 312.
  36. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 94.
  37. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 92.
  38. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 102.
  39. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 112.
  40. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 205.
  41. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 100.
  42. ^ David, Donald, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Nobles Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 110.
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