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1969 European Athletics Championships

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1969 European Athletics Championships

9th European Athletics Championships
Host city Athens, Greece
Date(s) 16 – 21 September 1969
Main stadium Georgios Karaiskakis Stadium
Level Senior
Type Outdoor
Participation 674 athletes from
30 nations
Events 38

The 9th European Athletics Championships were held from 16–21 September 1969 in the Karaiskaki Stadium of Athens, the capital of Greece. New at these championships were the women's 1500 metres and the women's 4×400 metres relay event. Moreover, women's 80 metres hurdles was replaced by women's 100 metres hurdles. Contemporaneous reports on the event were given in the Glasgow Herald.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

Former East German runner

  • European Athletics official website
  • Athletix

External links

  • "European Championships (Men)". gbrathletics.com. 2007. Archived from the original on 2 September 2010. Retrieved 21 August 2010. 
  • "European Championships (Women)". gbrathletics.com. 2007. Archived from the original on 22 September 2010. Retrieved 21 August 2010. 
Results
  1. ^ Marshall, Ron (September 15, 1969), British have talent and determination to win 12 medals,  
  2. ^ a b Athletics - May struck out of West German team,  
  3. ^ a b Nihill gives Britain her first gold medal,  
  4. ^ Anita Neil gives Britain unexpected bronze medal,  
  5. ^ Majestic run by Miss Board in 800 metres final,  
  6. ^ Steward dictates tactics in searing 5000 victory,  
  7. ^ Hill's thrilling marathon win gives Britain sixth gold medal,  
  8. ^ Cashmore, Ellis; Cashmore, Ernest, Sports Culture: An A-Z Guide, Taylor & Francis, 2003, p. 92, retrieved 6 September 2014 
  9. ^ Sport & Santé - Dopage - Les amphétamines : exemples (in French), retrieved 6 September 2014 
  10. ^ European Athletics Championships Zürich 2014 - STATISTICS HANDBOOK,  
  11. ^ European Athletics Championships Zürich 2014 - STATISTICS HANDBOOK,  

References

[11]According to an unofficial count, 675 athletes from 30 countries participated in the event, one athlete more than the official number of 674 as published.

Participation

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  East Germany 11 7 7 25
2  Soviet Union 9 7 7 23
3  Great Britain 6 4 7 17
4  France 3 4 0 7
5  Czechoslovakia 2 1 2 5
6  Poland 2 0 6 8
7  Hungary 1 2 0 3
8   Switzerland 1 1 1 3
9  Italy 1 0 3 4
10  Austria 1 0 1 2
11  Bulgaria 1 0 0 1
12=  Finland 0 2 0 2
12=  Sweden 0 2 0 2
12=  Romania 0 2 0 2
12=  Netherlands 0 2 0 2
16  West Germany 0 1 2 3
17=  Ireland 0 1 0 1
17=  Belgium 0 1 0 1
17=  Denmark 0 1 0 1
20=  Yugoslavia 0 0 1 1
20=  Norway 0 0 1 1

Medal table

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
 Petra Vogt (GDR) 11.6  Wilma van den Berg (NED) 11.7  Anita Neil (GBR) 11.8
200 metres
 Petra Vogt (GDR) 23.2  Renate Meissner (GDR) 23.3  Valerie Peat (GBR) 23.3
400 metres
 Nicole Duclos (FRA) 51.73  Colette Besson (FRA) 51.75  Maria Sykora (AUT) 53.0
800 metres
 Lillian Board (GBR) 2:01.4  Anneliese Damm Olesen (DEN) 2:02.6  Vera Nikolić (YUG) 2:02.6
1500 metres
 Jaroslava Jehličková (TCH) 4:10.7  Maria Gommers (NED) 4:11.9  Paola Pigni (ITA) 4:12.2
100 metres hurdles
 Karin Balzer (GDR) 13.29  Bärbel Podeswa (GDR) 13.68  Teresa Nowak (POL) 13.77
4 × 100 metres relay
 East Germany
Regina Hofer
Renate Meissner
Bärbel Podeswa
Petra Vogt
43.63  West Germany
Bärbel Hohnle
Jutta Stock
Rita Jahn-Wilden
Ingrid Becker
44.09  United Kingdom
Anita Neil
Denise Ramsden
Sheila Cooper
Valerie Peat
44.39
4 × 400 metres relay
 United Kingdom
Rosemary Stirling
Pat Lowe
Janet Simpson
Lillian Board
3:30.8  France
Bernadette Martin
Nicole Duclos
Eliane Jacq
Colette Besson
3:30.8  West Germany
Christa Czekay
Antje Gleichfeld
Inge Eckhoff
Christel Frese
3:32.7
High jump
 Miloslava Rezková (TCH) 1.83 m  Antonina Lazareva (URS) 1.83 m  Mária Mračnová (TCH) 1.83 m
Long jump
 Mirosława Sarna (POL) 6.49 m  Viorica Viscopoleanu (ROU) 6.45 m  Berit Berthelsen (NOR) 6.44 m
Shot put
 Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 20.43 m  Margitta Gummel (GDR) 19.58 m  Marita Lange (GDR) 19.56 m
Discus throw
 Tamara Danilova (URS) 59.28 m  Lyudmilla Muravyova (URS) 59.24 m  Karin Illgen (GDR) 58.66 m
Javelin throw
 Angéla Németh (HUN) 59.76 m  Marta Vidos Paulanyi (HUN) 58.80 m  Valentina Evert (URS) 56.56 m
Pentathlon
 Liese Prokop (AUT) 5030 pts  Meta Antenen (SUI) 4793 pts  Maria Chisiakova (URS) 4773 pts

Women

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
 Valeriy Borzov (URS) 10.4  Alain Sarteur (FRA) 10.4  Philippe Clerc (SUI) 10.5
200 metres
 Philippe Clerc (SUI) 20.6  Herman Burde (GDR) 20.9  Zenon Nowosz (POL) 20.9
400 metres
 Jan Werner (POL) 45.7  Jean-Claude Nallet (FRA) 45.8  Stanisław Grędziński (POL) 45.8
800 metres
 Dieter Fromm (GDR) 1:45.9  Jozef Plachý (TCH) 1:46.2  Manfred Matuschewski (GDR) 1:46.8
1500 metres
 John Whetton (GBR) 3:39.4  Frank Murphy (IRL) 3:39.5  Henryk Szordykowski (POL) 3:39.8
5000 metres
 Ian Stewart (GBR) 13:44.8  Rashid Sharafetdinov (URS) 13:45.8  Allan Blinston (GBR) 13:47.6
10,000 metres
 Jürgen Haase (GDR) 28:41.6  Michael Tagg (GBR) 28:43.2  Nikolay Sviridov (URS) 28:45.8
110 metres hurdles
 Eddy Ottoz (ITA) 13.5  David Hemery (GBR) 13.7  Alan Pascoe (GBR) 13.9
400 metres hurdles
 Vyacheslav Skomorokhov (URS) 49.7  John Sherwood (GBR) 50.1  Andrew Todd (GBR) 50.3
3000 metres steeplechase
 Mikhail Zhelev (BUL) 8:25.0  Aleksandr Morozov (URS) 8:25.6  Vladimir Dudin (URS) 8:26.6
4 × 100 metres relay
 France
Alain Sarteur
Patrick Bourbeillon
Gérard Fenouil
François St.-Gilles
38.8  Soviet Union
Aleksandr Lebedev
Vladislav Sapeya
Nikolay Ivanov
Valeriy Borzov
39.3  Czechoslovakia
Ladislav Kříž
Dionys Szogedi
Jiří Kynos
Luděk Bohman
39.5
4 × 400 metres relay
 France
Gilles Bertould
Christian Nicolau
Jacques Carette
Jean-Claude Nallet
3:02.3  Soviet Union
Yevgeniy Borisenko
Boris Savchuk
Yuriy Zorin
Aleksandr Bratchikov
3:03.0  West Germany
Horst-Rüdiger Schlöske
Ingo Röper
Gerhard Hennige
Martin Jellinghaus
3:03.1
Marathon
 Ron Hill (GBR) 2:16:47.8  Gaston Roelants (BEL) 2:17:22.2  Jim Alder (GBR) 2:19:05.8
20 kilometres walk
 Paul Nihill (GBR) 1:30:48.0  Leonida Karaiosifoglu (ROU) 1:31:06.4  Nikolay Smaga (URS) 1:31:20.2
50 kilometres walk
 Christoph Hohne (GDR) 4:12:32.8  Peter Selzer (GDR) 4:16:09.6  Veniamin Soldatenko (URS) 4:23:04.8
High jump
 Valentin Gavrilov (URS) 2.17 m  Reijo Vähälä (FIN) 2.17 m  Erminio Azzaro (ITA) 2.17 m
Pole vault
 Wolfgang Nordwig (GDR) 5.30 m  Kjell Isaksson (SWE) 5.20 m  Aldo Righi (ITA) 5.10 m
Long jump
 Igor Ter-Ovanesyan (URS) 8.17 m  Lynn Davies (GBR) 8.07 m  Tõnu Lepik (URS) 8.04 m
Triple jump
 Viktor Saneyev (URS) 17.34 m  Zoltan Cziffra (HUN) 16.85 m  Klaus Neumann (GDR) 16.68 m
Shot put
 Dieter Hoffmann (GDR) 20.12 m  Heinz-Joachim Rothenburg (GDR) 20.05 m  Hans-Peter Gies (GDR) 19.78 m
Discus throw
 Hartmut Losch (GDR) 61.82 m  Ricky Bruch (SWE) 61.08 m  Lothar Milde (GDR) 59.34 m
Javelin throw
 Jānis Lūsis (URS) 91.52 m  Pauli Nevala (FIN) 89.58 m  Janusz Sidło (POL) 82.90 m
Hammer throw
 Anatoliy Bondarchuk (URS) 74.68 m  Romuald Klim (URS) 72.74 m  Reinhard Theimer (GDR) 72.02 m
Decathlon
 Joachim Kirst (GDR) 8041 pts  Herbert Wessel (GDR) 7828 pts  Viktor Chelnikov (URS) 7801 pts

Men

Complete results were published.[10]

Medal summary

Contents

  • Medal summary 1
    • Men 1.1
    • Women 1.2
  • Medal table 2
  • Participation 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

The Dutch decathlete Edward de Noorlander was disqualified for the use of amphetamine, the first disqualification for doping in athletics.[8][9]

[3]

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