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1973–74 Philadelphia Flyers season

 

1973–74 Philadelphia Flyers season

The 1973–74 Philadelphia Flyers season was the Flyers' seventh season in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Flyers became the first expansion team to win the Stanley Cup. Prior to this season, no post-1967 expansion team had either beaten an Original Six team in a playoff round or won a Stanley Cup Final game.

Goaltender Bernie Parent, an "Original Flyer", returned to the franchise in the off-season, and the Flyers proved that the expansion teams could challenge the Original Six in 1973–74. The Bullies continued their rough-and-tumble ways, led by Dave Schultz's 348 penalty minutes, and reached the top of the West Division with a record of 50–16–12. The return of Parent proved to be of great benefit as he established himself as one of if not the best goaltender in the league by winning 47 games, a record which stood for 33 years. Since the Flyers, along with Chicago, allowed the fewest goals in the league, Parent also shared the Vezina Trophy with Chicago's Tony Esposito.

Come playoff time, the Flyers swept the Atlanta Flames in four games in the first round. In the semifinals, the Flyers faced the New York Rangers. The series, which saw the home team win every game, went seven games. The Flyers had home-ice advantage as they advanced to the Stanley Cup Finals by winning Game 7. Their opponent, Bobby Orr and the Boston Bruins, took Game 1 in Boston, but Bobby Clarke scored an overtime goal in Game 2 to even the series. The Flyers won Games 3 and 4 at home to take a 3–1 series lead, but Boston won Game 5 to stave off elimination. That set the stage for Game 6 at the Spectrum. The Flyers picked up the lead early when Rick MacLeish scored a first-period goal. Late in the game, Orr hauled down Clarke on a breakaway, a penalty which assured the Flyers of victory. Time expired as the Flyers brought the Stanley Cup to Philadelphia for the first time. Parent, having shut out Boston in Game 6, won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the Playoff MVP.

Regular season

The 1973–74 season opened on October 11, 1973, against the Toronto Maple Leafs. This was the first time Kate Smith performed "God Bless America" in person at a Flyers' game. The Flyers started strong to begin the season winning their first four games and only allowing their opponents to score three goals total while they netted 18. The Flyers were 29–11–6 heading into the All Star Game. The Flyers were represented in the All Star Game by Bobby Clarke, Bernie Parent, Ed Van Impe and Joe Watson. The Flyers finished 1st in the Western Division, seven points ahead of the second place Chicago Black Hawks.

The team was led offensively by Bobby Clarke, who led the team in goals with 35, assists with 52 and points with 87. He finished fifth among scoring leader in points. Clarke was named a 2nd Team All Stars along with defenseman Barry Ashbee. Clarke was followed by Bill Barber in goals (34), and by Rick MacLeish both in assists (45) and in points (77).

In net, the Flyers were led by goaltender Bernie Parent, who went 47–13–12, posted a 1.89 goals against average (136 goals against on 2038 shots) and 12 shutouts. Parent’s 47 wins was a record until Martin Brodeur won 48 games in the 2006–07 NHL season. It remains the record for most regulation wins by a goaltender in a single season as several of Brodeur's wins came in overtime and the shootout, neither of which existed in the 1970s. Parent was a co-winner of the Vezina Trophy, which was awarded at the time to any goaltenders who played 25 or more games for the team allowing the fewest goals against, with Black Hawks’ goaltender Tony Esposito.

Season standings

West Division[1]

GP W L T GF GA DIFF Pts
1 Philadelphia Flyers 78 50 16 12 273 164 +109 112
2 Chicago Black Hawks 78 41 14 23 272 164 +108 105
3 Los Angeles Kings 78 33 33 12 233 231 +2 78
4 Atlanta Flames 78 30 34 14 214 238 −24 74
5 Pittsburgh Penguins 78 28 41 9 242 273 −31 65
6 St. Louis Blues 78 26 40 12 206 248 −42 64
7 Minnesota North Stars 78 23 38 17 235 275 −40 63
8 California Golden Seals 78 13 55 10 195 342 −147 36


Playoffs

The Flyers opened the post season against the 4th place Atlanta Flames. The Flyers swept the Atlanta Flames in four games with a combined score of 17–6. Rick MacLeish led the Flyers with four goals during the series. He scored a natural hat-trick in Game 2.

The Flyers headed into a grueling semifinals match up against the New York Rangers, who had won the regular season series 2–1–2. The series opened up in Philadelphia at the Spectrum with the Flyers shutting out the Rangers 4–0 in Game 1 and taking Game 2 5–2. The series switched back to New York and the Rangers would take Game 3 5–3 and Game 4 in overtime 2–1. The Flyers won Game 5 at home 4–1. With the Rangers on the verge of defeat in Game 6 the Rangers won 4–1. In Game 7 Gary Dornhoefer scored the game winning goal with 10:59 left in the third. Rick MacLeish again led the Flyers in scoring in this series with seven goals. The home team was the winner of every game in the series.

This set up a Stanley Cup Finals matchup against the Boston Bruins, who won the season series 3–1–1. The series opened in Boston at the Boston Garden with Boston winning Game 1, 3–2 and the Flyers winning Game 2, 3–2 in overtime on a Bobby Clarke goal. The series moved to Philadelphia where the Flyers won Game 3, 4–1 and Game 4, 4–2. The series returned to Boston and Bruins won Game 5, 5–1. The series returned to Philadelphia for Game 6. Kate Smith performed "God Bless America" to a sell out crowd of 17,007 prior to the game. The Flyers won their first Stanley Cup on the lone goal of the game by Rick MacLeish in the first period. With seconds left on the Clock Gene Hart, the Flyers play-by-play announcer, made his famous call “Ladies and gentlemen, the Flyers are going to win the Stanley Cup. The Flyers win the Stanley Cup. The Flyers win the Stanley Cup. The Flyers have won the Stanley Cup!”. Bernie Parent was awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

Philadelphia Flyers 1974 Stanley Cup champions

Roster

  Centres
  Wingers
  Defencemen
  Goaltenders


  Coaching and administrative staff
  • Chairman/Owner: Ed Snider
  • President: Joe Scott
  • Vice Chairman: F. Eugene Dixon, Jr.
  • Vice President/General Manager: Keith Allen
  • Head Coach: Fred Shero
  • Assistant Coach: Mike Nykoluk
  • Director of Player Development: Marcel Pelletier
  • Trainer: Frank Lewis
  • Assistant Trainer: Jim McKenzie
  • Director of Public Relations: Joe Kodel(left off cup)
  • Director of Public Relations: John Bolgan (left off cup)

Stanley Cup engraving

  • Al MacAdam played five regular season games and one playoff game. Although he did receive a Stanley Cup ring, his name was not engraved on the Stanley Cup.[2]
  • Joe Kodel, John Blogan (Directors of Public Relations) were included on Philadelphia's Stanley Cup winning pictures in 1974, 1975, but their names do not appear on the Stanley Cup.

Schedule and results

Regular season

1973–74 regular season

Legend:       Win (2 points)       Loss (0 points)       Tie (1 point)

Playoffs

1974 Stanley Cup playoffs

Legend:       Win       Loss

Player stats

Skaters

Note: Pos = Position (C = Center; D = Defense; G = Goaltender; LW = Left Wing; RW = Right Wing); GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/- = Plus-minus (playoff plus-minus not available); PIM = Penalties in minutes; Bold denotes franchise record

# Player Age Pos GP G A P +/- PIM GP G A P PIM
Regular season Playoffs
16 Clarke, BobbyBobby Clarke 24 C 77 35 52 87 35 113 17 5 11 16 42
19 MacLeish, RickRick MacLeish 24 C 78 32 45 77 21 42 17 13 9 22 20
7 Barber, BillBill Barber 21 LW 75 34 35 69 34 54 17 3 6 9 18
18 Lonsberry, RossRoss Lonsberry 26 LW 75 32 19 51 16 48 17 4 9 11 18
12 Dornhoefer, GaryGary Dornhoefer 30 RW 57 11 39 50 13 125 14 5 6 11 43
21 Flett, BillBill Flett 30 RW 67 17 27 44 20 51 17 0 6 6 21
26 Kindrachuk, OrestOrest Kindrachuk 23 C 71 11 30 41 19 85 17 5 4 9 17
11 Saleski, DonDon Saleski 24 RW 77 15 25 40 21 131 17 2 7 9 24
8 Schultz, DaveDave Schultz 24 LW 73 20 16 36 26 348 17 2 4 6 139
17 Nolet, SimonSimon Nolet 32 RW 52 19 17 36 28 13 15 1 1 2 4
3 Bladon, TomTom Bladon 21 D 70 12 22 34 24 37 16 4 6 10 25
15 Crisp, TerryTerry Crisp 30 C 71 10 21 31 12 28 17 2 2 4 4
6 Dupont, AndreAndre Dupont 24 D 75 3 20 23 34 216 16 4 3 7 67
20 Watson, JimmyJimmy Watson 21 D 74 2 18 20 33 44 17 1 2 3 41
2 Van Impe, EdEd Van Impe 33 D 77 2 16 18 31 119 17 1 2 3 41
14 Watson, JoeJoe Watson 30 D 74 1 17 18 28 34 17 1 4 5 24
10 Clement, BillBill Clement 23 C 39 9 8 17 15 34 4 1 0 1 4
4 Ashbee, BarryBarry Ashbee 34 D 69 4 13 17 52 52 6 0 0 0 2
9 Kelly, BobBob Kelly 23 LW 65 4 10 14 10 130 5 0 0 0 11
1 Parent, BernieBernie Parent 28 G 73 0 3 3 N/A 24 17 0 0 0 4
30 Taylor, BobbyBobby Taylor 29 G 8 0 0 0 N/A 12
25 MacAdam, AlAl MacAdam 21 RW 5 0 0 0 -2 0 1 0 0 0 0
5 Lajeunesse, SergeSerge Lajeunesse 23 D 1 0 0 0 0 0
27 Cowick, BruceBruce Cowick 22 LW 8 0 0 0 9

Goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts; GA = Goals against; SV% = Save percentage; GAA = Goals against average; MIN = Minutes played; Bold denotes franchise record

# Player Age GP W L T SO GA SV% GAA MIN GP W L SO GA SV% GAA MIN
Regular season Playoffs
1 Parent, BernieBernie Parent 28 73 47 13 12 12 136 .933 1.89 4314 17 12 5 2 35 .933 2.02 1042
30 Taylor, BobbyBobby Taylor 29 8 3 3 0 0 26 .876 4.26 366

Awards and records

Awards

NHL
Award Recipient
All-Star Game representative Bobby Clarke
Bernie Parent
Ed Van Impe
Joe Watson
Conn Smythe Trophy Bernie Parent
Jack Adams Award Fred Shero
NHL First All-Star Team Bernie Parent (G)
NHL Second All-Star Team Bobby Clarke (C)
Barry Ashbee (D)
Vezina Trophy Bernie Parent [3]

Records

NHL player
Player Record Mark
Bernie Parent Regulation time wins, one season 47
Flyers player
Player Record Mark
Bernie Parent Games played by a goalie, one season 73
Bernie Parent Time on ice, one season 4,314 min.
Bernie Parent Wins, one season 47
Bernie Parent Shutouts, one season 12
Bernie Parent Save percentage, one season[4] .933
Dave Schultz Penalty minutes, one playoff season 139

Milestones

Player Milestone Reached
Bernie Parent 25th shutout March 3, 1974

Transactions

The Flyers were involved in the following transactions from May 11, 1973, the day after the deciding game of the 1973 Stanley Cup Finals, through May 19, 1974, the day of the deciding game of the 1974 Stanley Cup Finals.

Trades

Date
Details
May 15, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
rights to Bernie Parent
2nd-round pick in 1973
To Toronto Maple Leafs
1st-round pick in 1973
futures
May 15, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
Serge Lajeunesse
To Detroit Red Wings
Rick Foley
May 23, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
cash
To Toronto Maple Leafs
Willie Brossart
May 25, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
Bruce Cowick
To San Diego Gulls (WHL)
Bob Currier
Bob Hurlburt
Jim Stanfield
Tom Trevelyan
July 27, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
(completed May 15 trade)
To Toronto Maple Leafs
Doug Favell
November 1, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
George Pesut
To Detroit Red Wings
Bob Stumpf
December 1, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
Ray Schultz
To Toronto Maple Leafs
Frank Spring

Other transactions

Date Player Team (League) Notes
Signed via free agency
June 1, 1973 Steve Coates Michigan Tech Huskies (WCHA)
July 31, 1973 Mark Bousquet American International Yellow Jackets
September 1, 1973 Mike Boland Ottawa Nationals (WHA)
Re-signed
June 12, 1973 Orest Kindrachuk multi-year
June 22, 1973 Bernie Parent multi-year
Draft picks signed
June 5, 1973 Larry Goodenough London Knights (OHA) Drafted 20th overall, 1973
June 5, 1973 Brent Levins Swift Current Broncos (WCHL) Drafted 26th overall, 1973
June 5, 1973 Bob Stumpf New Westminster Bruins (WCHL) Drafted 40th overall, 1973
June 5, 1973 Mike Clarke Calgary Centennials (WCHL) Drafted 42nd overall, 1973
June 5, 1973 Dale Cook Victoria Cougars (WCHL) Drafted 58th overall, 1973
June 5, 1973 Michel Latreille Montreal Bleu Blanc Rouge (QMJHL) Drafted 74th overall, 1973
July 31, 1973 Tom Young Sudbury Wolves (OHA) Drafted 106th overall, 1973
July 31, 1973 Don O'Donahue Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds (OHA) Drafted 137th overall, 1973
August 20, 1973 Doug Ferguson Hamilton Red Wings (OHA) Drafted 90th overall, 1973

Draft picks

Philadelphia's picks at the 1973 NHL Amateur Draft in Montreal, Quebec.[5]

Round # Player Position Nationality College/Junior/Club Team (League)
2 20 Larry Goodenough Defense  Canada London Knights (OHA)
2 26 Brent Leavins Left Wing  Canada Swift Current Broncos (WCHL)
3 40 Bob Stumpf Right Wing  Canada New Westminster Bruins (WCHL)
3 42 Mike Clarke Center  Canada Calgary Centennials (WCHL)
4 58 Dale Cook Left Wing  Canada Victoria Cougars (WCHL)
5 74 Michel Latreille Defense  Canada Montreal Red White and Blue (QMJHL)
6 90 Doug Ferguson Defense  Canada Hamilton Red Wings (OHA)
7 106 Tom Young Forward  Canada Sudbury Wolves (OHA)
8 122 Norm Barnes Defense  Canada Michigan State Spartans (CCHA)
9 137 Dan O'Donohue Defense  Canada Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds (OHA)
10 153 Brian Dick Right Wing  Canada Winnipeg Jets (WCHL)

Farm teams

The Flyers were affiliated with the Richmond Robins of the AHL[6] and the San Diego Gulls of the WHL.[7] Rene Drolet led the Robins with 73 points and Richmond finished 4th in their division and lost in five games to the Baltimore Clippers in the first round of the playoffs.[8] San Diego finished 3rd in the 6-team WHL's final season in existence. The Gulls also ceased operations once the New Jersey Knights of the WHA moved to San Diego and became the San Diego Mariners.

References

General
  • Results and Schedule
  • Schedule and Results
  • Playoff Results
Specific
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