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1986 World Ice Hockey Championships

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1986 World Ice Hockey Championships

1986 World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country  USSR
Dates 12–28 April
Teams 8
Final positions
Champions   Soviet Union (20th title)
Runner-up   Sweden
Third place   Canada
Fourth place  Finland
Tournament statistics
Matches played 40
Goals scored 296 (7.4 per match)
Attendance 375,820 (9,396 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Sergei Makarov 18 points
1985
1987

The 1986 Ice Hockey World Championships took place in the Soviet Union from 12 April to 28 April. The games were played at the Luzhniki Palace of Sports and the CSKA Ice Palace in Moscow, and eight teams took part. Each team played each other once, and then The four best teams then played each other once more with no results carrying over, and the other four teams played each other again to determine ranking and relegation. This was the 51st World Championships, and also the 62nd ice hockey European Championships. The reigning world champions from Czechoslovakia finished fifth, and the Soviet Union became World Champions for the twentieth time, and also won their 24th European Championship. In the European Championship, only mutual games between European teams in the first round were counted. For the disappointing Czechs, this was the first time since 1967 that they had finished out of the medals.[1]

Attracting little notice at the time, Brett Hull made his debut in international hockey for the USA. It would appear that if Canadian coach Dave King had invited him to play in Moscow, the College student with dual citizenship, would have happily chosen a different path. Instead he chose to accept coach Dave Peterson's offer to compete for the Americans.[1][2]

World Championship Group A (Soviet Union)

First Round

Team Games Won Tied Lost GF - GA Points
1  Soviet Union 7 7 0 0 32 - 09 14
2  Sweden 7 5 1 1 34 - 18 11
3  Finland 7 4 2 1 28 - 18 10
4  Canada 7 3 0 4 24 - 22 6
5  Czechoslovakia 7 2 1 4 17 - 17 5
6  United States 7 2 0 5 27 - 28 4
7  West Germany 7 2 0 5 17 - 39 4
8  Poland 7 1 0 6 15 - 43 2
12 April Canada  8-3
 West Germany
12 April Finland  5-4
 United States
12 April Poland  2-1
 Czechoslovakia
12 April Soviet Union  4-2
 Sweden
13 April Sweden  4-1
 Canada
13 April United States  7-2
 Poland
13 April Soviet Union  4-1
 Finland
13 April West Germany  4-3
 Czechoslovakia
15 April Sweden  3-2
 Czechoslovakia
15 April Soviet Union  7-2
 Poland
15 April United States  9-2
 West Germany
15 April Finland  3-2
 Canada
16 April Canada  8-3
 Poland
16 April Finland  1-1
 Czechoslovakia
16 April Soviet Union  4-1
 West Germany
16 April Sweden  5-2
 United States
17 April Soviet Union  4-0
 Canada
17 April Czechoslovakia  5-2
 United States
17 April Finland  4-2
 Poland
17 April Sweden  4-2
 West Germany
18 April Sweden  12-3
 Poland
18 April Finland  10-1
 West Germany
19 April Canada  4-2
 United States
19 April Soviet Union  4-2
 Czechoslovakia
20 April West Germany  4-1
 Poland
20 April Sweden  4-4
 Finland
22 April Czechoslovakia  3-1
 Canada
22 April Soviet Union  5-1
 United States

Final Round

Team Games Won Tied Lost GF - GA Points
1  Soviet Union 3 3 0 0 18 - 06 6
2  Sweden 3 1 1 1 12 - 12 3
3  Canada 3 1 0 2 13 - 16 2
4  Finland 3 0 1 2 07 - 16 1
24 April Soviet Union  7-4
 Canada
24 April Sweden  4-4
 Finland
26 April Sweden  6-5
 Canada
26 April Soviet Union  8-0
 Finland
28 April Canada  4-3
 Finland
28 April Soviet Union  3-2
 Sweden

Consolation Round

Team Games Won Tied Lost GF - GA Points
5  Czechoslovakia 10 5 1 4 38 - 21 11
6  United States 10 4 0 6 41 - 43 8
7  West Germany 10 2 1 7 23 - 52 5
8  Poland 10 1 1 8 26 - 63 3
Poland, needing a win of four goals or more on the final day, tied, and were relegated
23 April Czechoslovakia  8-1
 Poland
23 April United States  5-0
 West Germany
25 April United States  7-5
 Poland
25 April Czechoslovakia  3-1
 West Germany
27 April Czechoslovakia  10-2
 United States
27 April West Germany  5-5
 Poland

World Championship Group B (Netherlands)

Played in Eindhoven March 20–29. The Swiss, narrowly failing to gain promotion in last year's tournament, made no mistake this year, losing only in a final meaningless game against East Germany. On the last day of competition, four different nations were in danger of relegation, with a myriad of tie breaking scenarios.[3]
Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points Tie
H2H Points
4-way
Tie
H2H Points
4th/5th 6th/7th
9  Switzerland 7 6 0 1 38 - 20 12
10  Italy 7 4 0 3 21 - 18 8
11  East Germany 7 4 0 3 25 - 21 8
12  France 7 3 0 4 22 - 25 6 4 2
13  Netherlands 7 3 0 4 25 - 32 6 4 0
14  Austria 7 3 0 4 24 - 27 6 2 2
15  Yugoslavia 7 3 0 4 24 - 25 6 2 0
16  Japan 7 2 0 5 15 - 26 4
Switzerland was promoted to Group A. Depending on the results of the final day, two of Austria, Japan, the Netherlands, and Yugoslavia would be relegated. In the first game Yugoslavia played Japan with the loser being relegated. A five to zero score relegated Japan. In the next game, Italy beat France, assuring the Austrians of safety from relegation. The Dutch had their fate in their own hands in the last game, a win and they would remain, a loss and they would be relegated. The unfortunate Yugoslavian team had to watch all day and hope, a hope dashed by a Dutch three to two win over Austria.[4]
20 March Netherlands  6-3
 Yugoslavia
20 March East Germany  4-6
 Austria
20 March Switzerland  4-1
 Italy
20 March France  1-2
 Japan
21 March Austria  1-6
 Italy
21 March Japan  4-6
 Switzerland
22 March Netherlands  3-4
 France
22 March East Germany  4-2
 Yugoslavia
23 March Switzerland  8-2
 France
23 March Yugoslavia  2-5
 Austria
23 March Netherlands  3-4
 Japan
23 March East Germany  3-4
 Italy
24 March Japan  0-1
 Italy
24 March Austria  3-4
 Switzerland
25 March France  5-6
 Yugoslavia
25 March Netherlands  2-5
 East Germany
26 March Italy  1-4
 Yugoslavia
26 March Japan  3-4
 East Germany
26 March France  6-1
 Austria
26 March Netherlands  3-11
 Switzerland
28 March East Germany  0-3
 France
28 March Yugoslavia  2-4
 Switzerland
28 March Japan  2-6
 Austria
28 March Netherlands  5-3
 Italy
29 March Yugoslavia  5-0
 Japan
29 March Italy  5-1
 France
29 March Switzerland  1-5
 East Germany
29 March Netherlands  3-2
 Austria

World Championship Group C (Spain)

Played in Puigcerda March 23 to April 1.

First Round

Group C was expanded this year, ten teams were divided into two groups of five. The top two from each group played off for first, while third and fourth places played off for fifth through eighth. Mutual games from the first round were carried forward and counted in the second round. The two last place teams were relegated to the first Group D.

Group 1

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Norway 4 4 0 0 42 - 07 8
2  Romania 4 3 0 1 26 - 09 6
3  Denmark 4 2 0 2 18 - 13 4
4  Spain 4 0 1 3 08 - 32 1
5  South Korea 4 0 1 3 05 - 38 1
South Korea was relegated to Group D.
23 March Norway  18-3
 Spain
23 March Romania  13-0
 South Korea
24 March Norway  11-1
 South Korea
24 March Romania  5-1
 Denmark
26 March South Korea  1-11
 Denmark
26 March Romania  5-2
 Spain
27 March Norway  7-0
 Denmark
27 March Spain  3-3
 South Korea
29 March Denmark  6-0
 Spain
29 March Norway  6-3
 Romania

Group 2

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  China 4 3 1 0 35 - 04 7
2  Bulgaria 4 3 0 1 13 - 16 6
3  North Korea 4 1 1 2 08 - 15 3
4  Hungary 4 1 1 2 17 - 14 3
5  Australia 4 0 1 3 09 - 33 1
Australia was relegated to Group D.
23 March China  15-0
 Australia
23 March Hungary  2-4
 North Korea
24 March Australia  3-11
 Hungary
24 March China  9-1
 Bulgaria
26 March North Korea  1-9
 China
26 March Australia  4-5
 Bulgaria
27 March North Korea  2-2
 Australia
27 March Bulgaria  5-2
 Hungary
29 March Bulgaria  2-1
 North Korea
29 March Hungary  2-2
 China

Final Round

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
17  Norway 3 2 1 0 19 - 07 5
18  China 3 2 1 0 16 - 07 5
19  Bulgaria 3 1 0 2 09 - 23 2
20  Romania 3 0 0 3 10 - 17 0
Norway and China were both promoted to Group B.
30 March Norway  10-1
 Bulgaria
30 March China  4-3
 Romania
1 April Bulgaria  7-4
 Romania
1 April Norway  3-3
 China

Consolation Round

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
21  Denmark 3 3 0 0 20 - 05 6
22  Hungary 3 1 0 2 16 - 17 2
23  North Korea 3 1 0 2 10 - 14 2
24  Spain 3 1 0 2 11 - 21 2
30 March Denmark  8-4
 Hungary
30 March Spain  6-5
 North Korea
1 April Spain  5-10
 Hungary
1 April Denmark  6-1
 North Korea
Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
25  South Korea 1 1 0 0 09 - 07 2
26  Australia 1 0 0 1 07 - 09 0
31 March South Korea  9-7
 Australia

Ranking and statistics

 


 1986 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Soviet Union
20th title

Tournament Awards

Final standings

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:
 Soviet Union
 Sweden
 Canada
4  Finland
5  Czechoslovakia
6  United States
7  West Germany
8  Poland

European championships final standings

The final standings of the European championships according to IIHF:
 Soviet Union
 Sweden
 Finland
4  West Germany
5  Poland
6  Czechoslovakia

Scoring leaders

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.
Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Sergei Makarov 10 4 14 18 +21 12 F
Vladimir Krutov 10 7 10 17 +23 14 F
Viacheslav Fetisov 10 6 9 15 +20 10 D
Vladimír Růžička 10 4 11 15 +15 6 F
Jiří Hrdina 10 7 5 12 +14 12 F
Vyacheslav Bykov 10 6 6 12 +6 2 F
Anders Carlsson 10 6 6 12 +5 12 F
Thomas Steen 8 8 3 11 +13 16 F
Brett Hull 10 7 4 11 +1 16 F
Brent Sutter 8 4 7 11 +2 8 F
Source: [1]

Leading goaltenders

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.
Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Yevgeni Belosheikin 420 11 1.57 .915 2
Dominik Hašek 538 19 2.12 .901 0
Chris Terreri 286 20 4.20 .895 1
Jacques Cloutier 298 15 3.02 .893 0
Hannu Kamppuri 299 16 3.21 .880 0
Source: [2]

Citations

  1. ^ a b Duplacey 507
  2. ^ Brett Hull stands by his decision to play for Americans
  3. ^ Group B summary
  4. ^ Tie breaking format reference in addition 1992 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships for how four way ties are broken.

References

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