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1988–89 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

1988–89 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
A blue block M with maize-colored borders and the word Michigan across the middle.
NCAA National Champions
Southeast Regional Champions
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches #10
AP #10
1988–89 record 30-7 (12-6 Big Ten)
Head coach Bill Frieder/Steve Fisher
Assistant coach Mike Boyd
Assistant coach Steve Fisher
Assistant coach Brian Dutcher
MVP Glen Rice
Captain Glen Rice
Captain Mark Hughes
Home arena Crisler Arena
1988–89 Big Ten Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#8 Indiana 15 3   .833     27 8   .771
#3 Illinois 14 4   .778     31 5   .861
#10 Michigan 12 6   .667     30 7   .811
#14 Iowa 10 8   .556     23 10   .697
Minnesota 9 9   .500     19 12   .613
Wisconsin 8 10   .444     18 12   .600
Purdue 8 10   .444     15 16   .484
Ohio State 6 12   .333     19 15   .559
Michigan State 6 12   .333     18 15   .545
Northwestern 2 16   .111     9 19   .321
Rankings from AP Poll)

The 1988–89 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1988–89 season. The Head Coach was head coach Bill Frieder, who was dismissed before the 1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament and replaced by assistant Steve Fisher. The team played its home games in the Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was a member of the Big Ten Conference. The team finished third in the Big Ten Conference.[1] The team earned the number three seed in the 1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament where it emerged victorious as national champion.[2] The team was ranked all eighteen weeks of the season in the Associated Press Top Twenty Poll where it began the season at number three, ended at number ten and peaked at number two.[3] and it also ended the season ranked tenth in the final UPI Coaches' Poll.[4]

The team repeated as the national statistical champion in team field goal percentage (56.6%, 1325 of 2341).[5] During the season the team set numerous national and conference records. Glen Rice set the current Big Ten single-game three-point field goals percentage record against Wisconsin on February 25, 1989 (100% most made, 7 of 7).[6] He also broke Mike McGee's Big Ten career points record with 2442, but that was eclipsed in 1993,[6] although it remains the school record.[7] The team set the following current Big Ten records: single-season points (3393), single-season field goals made (1325), single-season field goals attempted (2341), single-season field goal percentage (.566), single-season field goals percentage (conference games only, .561, 606 of 1,080), and single-season assists (745).[8][9][10] Rice and Mark Hughes served as team co-captains and Rice earned team MVP.[11] Rice was also recognized as a consensus All-American.[12] Dave Balza was student manager.[13]

Rice's 949 points established the current school single-season record, surpassing Cazzie Russell's 1966 record of 800.[7] He also set the current school single-season field goals record of 363, surpassing Mike McGee.[14] He set the current single-season three-point field goal percentage record of 51.56%, surpassing Gary Grant's previous season mark of 48.53%. Additionally, he set the school record for career and single-season three-point shots made with 135 and 99, respectively, that would last for ten years and eight years, respectively.[15] He also set the current single-game field goal percentage record of 100% (7-for-7) against Wisconsin on February 25, 1989, surpassing Garde Thompson's 8-for-9 1986 performance.[15] Loy Vaught also broke the Michigan single field goal percentage record of 62.18% that he set the prior year by reaching a 66.12%, which would stand as the record until 1995.[14] For the third year in a row, the team established a new Michigan single-season scoring record with 3393 points.[7] For the last of five consecutive seasons, the team set the school record for single-season field goal percentage on with a 56.6% (1325-for-2341) performance. This continues to be the school record.[14] The team also set the current school single-season three-point field goal percentage record of 46.8% (196-for-419), surpassing the 1987 record, while setting a school record for three-point field goals made of 196 that would last until 1997.[15] The team set the current school single-season free throws made record of 547, which surpassed the 1977 mark of 510.[16]> For the third of three consecutive seasons, the team set the school single-season total assist record with a total of 745, surpassing the prior total of 694 and establishing the current record.[17] Glen Rice ended his career with 134 games played, which surpassed Gary Grant's 1988 school record of 129 games. Loy Vaught would surpass this record the following year.[18]

The team earned numerous conference statistical championships. Rice won the scoring average championship for conference games only with a 24.8 average as well as the three-point shot championship with 55 in his conference games.[19][20] Loy Vaught won the field goal percentage title with a 67.7% mark.[19] Terry Mills won the blocked shots championship with a 1.22 average in conference games.[21] In addition, the team won scoring offense (87.8),[22] scoring margin (10.3),[22] field goal percentage (56.1%)[23] and three-point field goals made (103).[23]

During the six-game championship tournament run, Rice set the current NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament single-tournament records for points (184), field goals made (75), and three-point field goals made (27) as well as the career record for three-point field goal percentage (minimum 30 made, 56.5%, 35–62).[24] In addition, Rumeal Robinson set the current championship game assists record (11 on April 3, 1989 vs. Seton Hall in overtime)[25] as well as the current final four two-game assist record of 23.[26] The team also set the final four two-game assist record of 42, which would be broken the following year.[26]

In the 64-team NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, number three seeded Michigan won the tournament by defeating the fourteen-seeded Xavier Musketeers 92–87, the six-seeded South Alabama 91–82, the two-seeded North Carolina, who had ousted them the prior two years, 92–87, the five-seeded Virginia 102–65, the one-seeded Illinois 83–81 and three-seeded Seton Hall 80–79 in overtime.[2] Against North Carolina, the team set the school record of 13 three-point field goals made, which would last until February 22, 1998.[15]

They became the first team in school history to win 30 games and because the 1993 team’s 31 victories have been adjusted for the University of Michigan basketball scandal, they remain the winningest team in school history according to the NCAA recordbook.[27] The team continues to rank second in NCAA history in single-season team field goal percentage: 56.6% (1325 of 2341).[28]

Contents

  • Regular season 1
  • Rankings 2
  • Statistics 3
  • Awards and honors 4
  • Team players drafted into the NBA 5
  • References 6

Regular season

Rankings

Ranking movements
Legend: ██ Increase in ranking. ██ Decrease in ranking.
NR = Not ranked. RV = Received votes. ( ) = First place votes.
Week
Poll Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Final 
AP Poll[3]


Statistics

The team posted the following statistics:[29]
Name GP GS Min Avg FG FGA FG% 3FG 3FGA 3FG% FT FTA FT% OR DR RB Avg Ast Avg PF DQ TO Stl Blk Pts Avg
Glen Rice 37 37 363 629 0.577 99 192 0.516 124 149 0.832 77 155 232 6.3 85 2.3 75 1 81 39 11 949 25.6
Rumeal Robinson 37 36 199 357 0.557 30 64 0.469 122 186 0.656 31 94 125 3.4 233 6.3 105 5 131 70 4 550 14.9
Loy Vaught 37 21 201 304 0.661 2 5 0.400 63 81 0.778 94 202 296 8.0 36 1.0 94 3 50 19 11 467 12.6
Terry Mills 37 37 180 319 0.564 0 2 0.000 70 91 0.769 75 144 219 5.9 104 2.8 95 3 77 20 49 430 11.6
Sean Higgins 34 16 158 312 0.506 51 110 0.464 54 70 0.771 31 76 107 3.1 51 1.5 76 2 60 10 11 421 12.4
Mark Hughes 35 4 104 171 0.608 1 2 0.500 29 48 0.604 41 101 142 4.1 40 1.1 60 0 26 11 7 238 6.8
Michael Griffin 37 31 33 63 0.524 0 2 0.000 33 43 0.767 24 65 89 2.4 103 2.8 104 3 56 23 9 99 2.7
Kirk Taylor 21 2 33 69 0.478 7 18 0.389 21 36 0.583 12 34 46 2.2 46 2.2 30 1 23 20 6 94 4.5
Demetrius Calip 30 0 229 7.6 22 50 0.440 2 9 0.222 14 17 0.824 5 14 19 0.6 25 0.8 20 0 23 7 0 60 2.0
J.P. Oosterbaan 23 0 22 39 0.564 0 1 0.000 9 13 0.692 9 18 27 1.2 11 0.5 15 0 9 0 3 53 2.3
Rob Pelinka 24 1 108 4.5 9 25 0.360 4 14 0.286 7 10 0.700 5 10 15 0.6 10 0.4 7 0 12 3 2 29 1.2
Marc Koenig 6 0 9 1.5 1 1 1.000 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.2 1 0.2 1 0 3 2 0 2 0.3
TEAM 37 20 63 83 2.2 6
Season Total 37 1325 2339 0.566 196 419 0.468 546 744 0.734 424 977 1401 37.9 745 20.1 682 18 557 224 113 3392 91.7
Opponents 37 1055 2322 0.454 164 466 0.352 493 710 0.694 411 699 1110 30.0 514 13.9 705 17 568 227 36 2767 74.8

Awards and honors

Team players drafted into the NBA

Five players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[31][32]
Year Round Pick Overall Player NBA Club
1989 1 4 4 Glen Rice Miami Heat
1990 1 10 10 Rumeal Robinson Atlanta Hawks
1990 1 13 13 Loy Vaught Los Angeles Clippers
1990 1 16 16 Terry Mills Milwaukee Bucks
1990 2 27 54 Sean Higgins San Antonio Spurs

References

  1. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  2. ^ a b "NCAA Tournament History". University of Michigan. 2010. p. 3. Retrieved 9 September 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Division I Records".  
  4. ^ "Division I Records".  
  5. ^ "Division I Records".  
  6. ^ a b "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  7. ^ a b c "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com.  
  8. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  9. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  10. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  11. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com.  
  12. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com.  
  13. ^ "No. 24 Michigan 76, Florida Gulf Coast 59".  
  14. ^ a b c "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com.  
  15. ^ a b c d "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com.  
  16. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com.  
  17. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com.  
  18. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com.  
  19. ^ a b "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  20. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  21. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  22. ^ a b "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  23. ^ a b "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide".  
  24. ^ "Division I Championship".  
  25. ^ "The Final Four".  
  26. ^ a b "The Final Four".  
  27. ^ "Division I Records".  
  28. ^ "Division I Records".  
  29. ^ "Men's Basketball Statistic Archive Query Page".  
  30. ^ "Final Four Most Outstanding Players". cbs.sportsline.com. Retrieved 31 March 2008. 
  31. ^ "1989 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  32. ^ "1990 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
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