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1994 New York Yankees season

 

1994 New York Yankees season

Template:MLB yearly infobox The New York Yankees' 1994 season was the 92nd season for the Yankees. New York was managed by Buck Showalter and played at Yankee Stadium. The team finished with a record of 70-43 finishing 6 12 games ahead of the Baltimore Orioles, having the best record in the American League and the second-best record in Major League Baseball.[1] The season was cut short by the infamous 1994 player's strike, which wiped out any postseason aspirations for their first postseason appearance since losing the 1981 World Series and that their star player and captain, Don Mattingly, had. On the day the strike began, the Yankees were on pace to win at least 100 games for the first time since 1980.[2] The Yankees' ace, 33 year-old veteran Jimmy Key, was leading the majors with 17 wins and was on pace to win 24 games.[1] Right fielder Paul O'Neill was also having a career year, as he was leading the league with a .359 batting average.[1]

The strike is remembered bitterly by Yankees fans as it shook sports fans in New York City and the Yankees to the core and made 1994 one of the worst years in New York City sports history,[3] and has been named among the 10 worst moments in New York City sports history,[4] primarily because Mattingly had not played in a postseason.[5][6] It was also seen as the frustrating peak of the Yankees' demise and downfall of the 1980s and early 1990s.[3]

When reacting to the strike, many fans said that the strike and the lost Yankees season was another to the blow to baseball backers in New York City, following the move of the Dodgers and the Giants to California for the 1958 season, the demise of the Yankees during the 1960s and early 1970s and 1980s and early 1990s, and the bad baseball at Shea Stadium during the late 1970s and early 1990s.[3] They also said it was the latest to the demise and downfall of the 1980s and early 1990s.[3]

Because the Yankees were last in a postseason in a season cut short by a strike, the news media constantly reminded the Yankees about the parallels between the two Yankee teams (1981 and 1994), which included both Yankee teams having division leads taken away by strike.[7][8] Also, throughout October, they continued to bombard the Yankees, making speculations about what might have been if there had not been a strike, making references to the days games in the post-season would have been played.[9]

Offseason

Regular season

By Friday, August 12, the Yankees had compiled a 70-43 record through 113 games. They were leading the AL East Division and had scored 670 runs (5.93 per game) and allowed 534 runs (4.73 per game).[17]

The World Series, for which the Yankees appeared to be destined,[9] was never played and contributed to Buck Showalter being fired and Don Mattingly retiring after the 1995 season.[18] The 1994 New York Yankees team that could have been remains a hot discussion point in both baseball and in New York City because Mattingly had not played in a postseason.[19][20] When reacting to the strike's cancellation of the season, the first words many people on the Yankees, including Owner George Steinbrenner, General Manager Gene Michael, and Showalter all said was that they all felt bad for Mattingly, saying that he deserved a postseason.[21][22][23][24] Mattingly led active players in both games played and at bats without ever appearing in the postseason.[6]

Opening Day lineup

Season standings

Template:MLB standings Template:1994 AL Wild Card standings

Notable transactions

  • March 21, 1994: Paul Assenmacher was traded by the Yankees to the Chicago White Sox for Brian Boehringer.[25]
  • March 29, 1994: Kevin Maas was released by the Yankees.[26]
  • May 1, 1994: Kevin Elster was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[27]
  • May 5, 1994: Bob Ojeda was released by the New York Yankees.[14]
  • May 6, 1994: Jeff Reardon was released by the New York Yankees.[16]
  • June 23, 1994: Sam Horn was released by the New York Yankees.[13]
  • July 3, 1994: Greg A. Harris was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[28]
  • July 13, 1994: Greg A. Harris was released by the New York Yankees.[28]

Roster

1994 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

= Indicates team leader

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI
C Mike Stanley 82 290 54 87 .300 17 57
1B Mattingly, DonDon Mattingly 97 372 62 113 .304 6 51
3B Boggs, WadeWade Boggs 97 366 61 125 .342 11 55
CF Bernie Williams 108 408 80 118 .289 12 57
RF O'Neill, PaulPaul O'Neill 103 368 68 132 .359 21 83
[29]

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI
Velarde, RandyRandy Velarde 77 280 47 78 .279 9 34

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Wickman, BobBob Wickman 53 5 4 6 3.09 56

Awards and honors

All-Star Game

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Columbus Clippers International League Stump Merrill
AA Albany-Colonie Yankees Eastern League Bill Evers
A Tampa Yankees Florida State League Jake Gibbs
A Greensboro Bats South Atlantic League Trey Hillman
Short-Season A Oneonta Yankees New York-Penn League Ken Dominguez
Rookie GCL Yankees Gulf Coast League Héctor López
LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Tampa[30]

References

External links

  • 1994 New York Yankees
  • 1994 New York Yankees team page at www.baseball-almanac.com
Preceded by
Toronto Blue Jays
1993
AL East Championship Season
1994
Succeeded by
Boston Red Sox
1995
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